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Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 134
Measuring the glacier margin.
Date Published: April 5, 2016

Glacier Monitoring Studies

The purpose of the CCME's glacier monitoring studies is to systematically monitor changes in Glacier National Park’s namesake glaciers and to determine the causes of changes, assess their ecological and hydrological effects, and predict future changes and effects.

Wetlands
Date Published: April 2, 2016
Status: Active

Restoring Montana Pothole Wetlands - Demonstration Sites and Adaptive Management

Geologic processes from the last ice age have generated extensive areas of pothole wetlands in several Montana landscapes. The Laurentide ice sheet, originating in the Northwest Territories, provided the dominant force in eastern Montana. Similar landscapes developed in the broad valleys of western Montana through the actions of the Cordilleran ice sheet, originating in the mountains of...

Contacts: Todd Preston
Wyoming landscape in spring.
Date Published: April 1, 2016

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI)

The WLCI is a long-term science based effort to enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale in Southwest Wyoming, while facilitating responsible development.

Weather radar reflecting songbirds over central and eastern North America.
Date Published: March 29, 2016

Realizing the biological potential of weather radar

The modern use of field deployed remote sensors generates large amounts of environmental data on natural systems, and this benefits natural sciences. Today’s automated sensors are fast, run nearly continuously, eliminate the need for “people power”, are cost effective to operate and maintain, and monitor the environment in ways humans cannot. The US network of more than 200 weather radars, the...

Contacts: Robb Diehl
Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park.
Date Published: March 18, 2016

Developing a mechanistic understanding between recent climate patterns and Aquatic Vital Signs in the Greater Yellowstone Network

The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program was established to provide park managers with a broad understanding of the status of park resources using the best available science. This program acknowledges that NPS managers are confronted with complex challenges associated with the management of dynamic landscapes responding to multiple, interacting drivers of change. To provide...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
An invasive American bullfrog with tracking device.
Date Published: March 18, 2016

American bullfrog suppression in the Yellowstone River floodplain

The American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) has recently invaded backwater and side-channel habitats of the Yellowstone River, near Billings, Montana. In other regions, bullfrog invasions have been linked to numerous amphibian declines (e.g., Adams and Pearl 2007). Immediate management actions may be able to suppress or eradicate localized populations of bullfrogs because they are present at low...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Sampling for invasive northern pike in south central Alaska.
Date Published: March 18, 2016

Conservation of native salmonids in South-Central Alaska

The proliferation of introduced northern pike in Southcentral Alaska is an urgent fishery management concern because pike are voracious predators that prey heavily on juvenile salmonids. Eradication of pike is not possible in connected freshwater networks, so managers must develop control methods that reduce pike populations to less destructive numbers. We are using field and bioenergetics...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Sampling for aquatic invasive species in the Greater Yellowstone Area.
Date Published: March 18, 2016

An investigation of aquatic invasive species in pristine sites in the Greater Yellowstone Area

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are aquatic organisms that move into ecosystems beyond their natural, historic range and cause severe and irreversible damage to the habitats they invade. Most AIS arrive as a direct result of human activity, such as boating and angling. The threat of AIS introduction is especially high in the Greater Yellowstone Area, as humans from all over the world come to...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Thrush feeding babies.
Date Published: March 16, 2016
Status: Active

The ecology, behavior, and conservation of migratory birds

U.S. Geological Survey research contributes to conservation measures and improved management of migratory bird populations and their habitats across the United States. Migratory birds provide ecosystem benefits that include pest control, pollination of plants and serve as food sources for other wildlife. They are also a source of recreation for millions of bird watchers and enthusiasts who...

Boreal toad on a burned log.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Apex Sites

In contrast to RARMI study areas in Colorado that have 10 or more years of records of continuous population monitoring, there are fewer long-term datasets for amphibian populations in the northern Rocky Mountains. The exception is an ongoing study of Columbia spotted frogs at Lodge Creek, Yellowstone National Park. Three other long-term research and monitoring areas have been established in...

Contacts: Blake Hossack
Red spotted toad.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Apex Sites

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as...

A wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana as shown in thermal imagery.
Date Published: March 15, 2016
Status: Completed

COMPLETED: Using thermal imagery to assess wolf hairloss from sarcoptic mange

Researchers at NOROCK and their partners used thermal cameras at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana to assess the amount of heat lost under a range of environmental conditions with and without hair. These methods help scientists better understand how mange operates in wild wolves throughout the Greater...

Contacts: Paul Cross, Emily Almberg, Doug Smith, Adam Munn, Peter Hudson, John Heine, Dan Stahler, Shane Maloney

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 335
USGS hydrologic technician collecting groundwater level data
December 31, 2015

USGS hydrologic technician collecting groundwater level data

USGS hydrologic technician Jayson Blom collects a groundwater-level measurement from an aquifer monitoring well at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Filtering water for eDNA sample collection in Yellowstone National Park between Lewis and Shoshone Lakes.
December 31, 2015

Filtering water for eDNA sample collection.

Filtering water for eDNA sample collection in Yellowstone National Park between Lewis and Shoshone Lakes.

USGS staff dig snowpits to evaluate the snow structure after a wet snow avalanche cycle.
December 31, 2015

USGS staff dig snowpits to evaluate the snow structure.

USGS staff dig snowpits to evaluate the snow structure after a wet snow avalanche cycle. This helps identify weak layers responsible for wet slab avalanches along the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.

A mother grizzly bear and her cub in Yellowstone National Park.
December 31, 2015

A mother grizzly bear and her cub in Yellowstone National Park.

A USGS grizzly bear researcher snapped this picture of a mother grizzly bear and her cub in Yellowstone National Park. Recent research shows that fffspring of grizzly bear mothers with a history of human-bear conflicts are more likely to be involved in human-bear conflicts than offspring of mothers without a history of human-bear conflicts. 

Bridge and water gage house at the Coast Fork Willamette River at State Highway 58
December 18, 2015

Coast Fork Willamette River and Gage House

Coast Fork Willamette River and gage house at State Highway 58 near Goshen, Oregon, above flood stage on December 18, 2015.

December 9, 2015

Lightning Creek at Clark Fork, Idaho: December 9, 2015

On December 9, 2015, heavy rain and resulting snowmelt swelled many Pacific Northwest rivers to flood stage. One of these streams was Lightning Creek at Clark Fork, Idaho. In a 24-hour period, Lightning Creek rose from about 200 cubic feet per second (cfs) to more than 10,000 cfs as recorded at USGS strreamgage 12392155.
 

USGS Streamgage on the Williamson River
November 21, 2015

USGS Streamgage on the Williamson River

A U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist collects a water sample from the Williamson River below Chiloquin, Oregon. The sample was analyzed as part of a water-quality study the USGS conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Klamath Tribes.

October 21, 2015

What's the Big Idea? — Creating Cleaner Energy from Coal

Elliott Barnhart, a hydrologist with the USGS Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center, describes his work developing what could be a cleaner way to develop coal.

A USGS hydrologist collects a water sample
October 14, 2015

A U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist collects a water sample

After receiving permission from the homeowner, a U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist collects a water sample from a residential well in Emmett, Idaho. The sample was analyzed as part of a water-quality study the USGS conducted in cooperation with Gem County, Idaho and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality.

Old Montana Farmhouse
September 30, 2015

Old Montana Farmhouse

  • Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur,
...
Attribution: Northwest
Sampling for alpine insects above the stream in Glacier National Park.
September 21, 2015

Sampling for alpine insects above the stream in Glacier National Park.

A scientist is working to collect alpine insects by picking through moss below tiny, cold, alpine streams. This spot was below a small seep on a slope above a tributary to the Dry Fork, North of the Two Medicine area in Glacier National Park. 

This is an image taken in 2015 of Sperry Glacier in Glacier National Park.
September 15, 2015

Sperry Glacier, Sept. 25, 2015

This is an image taken in 2015 of Sperry Glacier in Glacier National Park. Accoriding to data released by the USGS, the warming climate has dramatically reduced the size of 39 glaciers in Montana since 1966, some by as much as 85 percent.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.