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Filter Total Items: 73
The aquatic lab at the Fort Collins Science Center. David Walters photo, USGS.
Date Published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Effects of Contaminants on Linked Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs

Most aquatic insects live in fresh water as larvae and move to land as flying adults to complete their life cycle. Although often ignored, the emergence of adults can transfer the effects of contamination from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems as the adults are eaten by predators such as spiders, birds, and bats.

A species distribution map of the United States
Date Published: July 5, 2016

Resource for Advanced Modeling (RAM)

Branch scientists have developed the Resource for Advanced Modeling (RAM), a modeling facility for collaborative research both within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and with the wider research community. The facility provides a collaborative working environment for up to 20 scientists from within the USGS and the wider research community. There are networked, wireless computing facilities...

A river bank that is being restored.
Date Published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Economic Impacts of Ecological Restoration

Federal investments in ecosystem restoration projects protect Federal trusts, ensure public health and safety, and preserve and enhance essential ecosystem services. These investments also generate business activity and create jobs. However, limited information exists on the costs and associated economic impacts of ecosystem restoration projects due to the complexity of the “restoration...

Cryan taking a female hoary bat out of a net. This bat was intercepted during its spring migration through New Mexico.
Date Published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Bat Species of Concern: An Ecological Synthesis for Resource Managers

A large number of bat species are considered “species of concern” in the United States and its Territories, and resource managers are increasingly interested in learning more about their distribution, status, and potential management.

Lionfish are spreading through the Western North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico
Date Published: July 4, 2016
Status: Active

Developing Ecological Forecasting Models for Invasive Species

Forecasts of where species might be and what impacts they may have are necessary for management of invasive species.  Researchers at FORT are using various approaches to provided needed information to resource managers to combat invasive plants, animals, and disease organisms.

Image: Brown Bats with White Nose Syndrome
Date Published: July 1, 2016
Status: Active

Surveillance for the Presence of White-Nose Syndrome in the Bat Community at El Malpais National Monument, New Mexico

In 1999 and 2000, FORT conducted a survey of bats at El Malpais National Monument and adjacent lands. During this study, several species of bats were documented, including some that are known to use caves or lava-tube formations as roosts. In the winter of 2006–2007, the fungus-caused disease known as “white-nose syndrome” (WNS) began devastating populations of hibernating bat species that use...

Grand Canyon, Arizona as seen from Desert View Point on the South Rim.
Date Published: July 1, 2016

Assessing Impacts to Ecosystems from Uranium Mining in the Grand Canyon Region

The use of uranium is an alternative energy source to petroleum products and some of the United States’ highest quality ore is located on the Colorado Plateau. However, some regions where suitable mining efforts are conducted include areas that are near important environmental resources such as National Parks that provide viewscapes and habitat for wildlife.

Storm in New Mexico, New Mexico Water Science Center
Date Published: June 28, 2016
Status: Active

Urban Storm-Water Program in the Albuquerque Metropolitan Area

As part of the surface-water drainage system of the Albuquerque metropolitan area, numerous ephemeral channels collect and transport surface water through the urban area and, eventually, into the Rio Grande.

A California Condor flying with a GPS device on its wing.
Date Published: June 27, 2016

Using Cell Technology to Track Species Movement

The Information Science Branch explored and developed ways to track species locations using a standard cellular phone network. This technology provides more tracking data at a faster rate and lower cost than traditional satellite tracking systems. The initial implementation of this approach currently provides support for the California Condor recovery program and is being extended to include...

Contacts: Tim Kern
ScienceCache screen shot.
Date Published: June 27, 2016

ScienceCache

Working with the Northern Rockies Science Center, the Information Science Branch designed and developed ScienceCache, a scientific geocaching mobile application framework. Initially developed for citizen science data collection, the application was extended to work for any field data collection effort. The lead researcher controls the data collection route, collection forms, and data...

Contacts: Tim Kern
ISB Cloud image.
Date Published: June 27, 2016

Information Science Virtual Private Cloud (IS-VPC)

The Information Science Branch developed a set of performance, security, and resiliency models to evaluate information architectures optimized for cloud hosting solutions.

Contacts: Tim Kern
Surface Disturbance and Reclamation Tracking Tool (SDARTT)
Date Published: June 27, 2016
Status: Active

Surface Disturbance and Reclamation Tracking Tool (SDARTT)

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) have partnered to create the Surface Disturbance Analysis and Reclamation Tracking Tool (SDARTT). SDARTT is to be the national repository for and analysis tool of disturbance data pertaining to public land operations for the BLM. Users will upload disturbance and reclamation data to SDARTT to map, analyze, and...

Contacts: Gail Montgomery
Filter Total Items: 778
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Year Published: 2018

Climate dictates magnitude of asymmetry in soil depth and hillslope gradient

Hillslope asymmetry is often attributed to differential eco‐hydro‐geomorphic processes resulting from aspect‐related differences in insolation. At midlatitudes, polar facing hillslopes are steeper, wetter, have denser vegetation, and deeper soils than their equatorial facing counterparts. We propose that at regional scales, the magnitude in...

Inbar, Assaf; Nyman, Petter; Rengers, Francis K.; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Sheridan, Gary J.

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Year Published: 2018

Improving earthquake rupture forecasts using California as a guide

This article discusses ways in which earthquake rupture forecast models might be improved. Because changes are most easily described in the context of specific models, the third Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3) and its presumed successor, UCERF4, is used as a basis for discussion. Virtually all of the issues and possible...

Field, Edward H.
Field, E. H. (2018). Improving Earthquake Rupture Forecasts Using California as a Guide, Seismological Research Letters, https://doi.org/10.1785/0220180151.

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Year Published: 2018

Observations of rotational motions from local earthquakes using two temporary portable sensors in Waynoka, Oklahoma

Characterizing rotational motions from earthquakes at local distances has the potential to improve earthquake engineering and seismic gradiometry by better characterizing the complete seismic wavefield. Applied Technology Associates (ATA) has developed a proto‐seismic magnetohydrodynamic (SMHD) three‐component rotational rate sensor. We deploy two...

Ringler, Adam T.; Anthony, Robert E.; Holland, A.A.; Wilson, David C.; Lin, C.-J.

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Year Published: 2018

Wetland stratigraphic evidence for variable megathrust earthquake rupture modes at the Cascadia subduction zone

Although widespread agreement that the Cascadia subduction zone produces great earthquakes of magnitude 8 to 9 was reached decades ago, debate continues about the rupture lengths, magnitudes, and frequency of megathrust earthquakes recorded by wetland stratigraphy fringing Cascadia’s estuaries. Correlation of such coastal earthquake evidence along...

Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.; Englehart, Simon; Hawkers, Andrea; Horton, Benjamin P.
Wetland stratigraphic evidence for variable megathrust earthquake rupture modes at the Cascadia subduction zone, in Piscitelli, A., Milella, M., and Mastronuzzi, G., eds, Abstract volume for IGCP Project 639 - Sea-level change from minutes to millenia, Crossing southern Italy, a traveling meeting from Taranto to Siracusa, Italy 17-21 Sept 2018, p. 85-87.

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Year Published: 2018

Development of a domestic earthquake alert protocol combining the USGS pager and FEMA Hazus systems

The U.S. Geological Survey’s PAGER automated alert system provides rapid (10-20 min) loss estimates in terms of ranges of fatalities and economic impact for all significant earthquakes around the globe. In contrast, FEMA’s Hazus software, which is currently operated manually by FEMA personnel internally within several hours of any large domestic...

Wald, David J.; Seligson, H.A.; Rozelle, Jesse; Burns, J.; Marano, Kristin; Jaiswal, Kishor; Hearne, Mike; Bausch, D

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Year Published: 2018

Increasing earthquake insurance coverage in California via parametric hedges

California has the highest earthquake risk of any state in the United States. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported in 2017 that 73% of the nation’s annual losses to earthquakes were expected to be concentrated in California and the Pacific Northwest. California alone constitutes 61% ($3.7 billion out of an estimated $6.1 billion...

Franco, Guillermo; Tirabassi, G; Lopeman, M; Wald, David J.; Siembieda, W.J.

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Year Published: 2018

State transportation agencies partner to deploy and enhance ShakeCast

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is organizing and leading a three-year Transportation Pooled Fund (TPF) project, Connecting the Dots: Implementing ShakeCast Across Multiple State Departments of Transportation for Rapid Post-Earthquake Response. Ten state Departments of Transportation (DOT)—CA, ID, MO, MS, OK, OR, SC, TX, UT...

Turner, L.; Wald, David J.; Lin, Kuo-wan; Chiou, Brian; Slosky, Daniel

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Year Published: 2018

Induced earthquake and liquefaction hazards in Oklahoma, USA: Constraints from InSAR

Oklahoma experienced three earthquakes of Mw5.0 or greater in 2016: the 13-Feb. Fairview earthquake (Mw5.1), the 03-Sep. Pawnee earthquake (Mw5.8), and the 07-Nov. Cushing earthquake (Mw5.0). These events are the first earthquakes in the state exceeding Mw5.0 since the 2011 Mw5.7 Prague earthquake and likely result from wide-scale deep...

Barnhart, William D.; Yeck, William L.; McNamara, Daniel E.
Barnhart, W. D., Yeck, W. L., & McNamara, D. E. (2018). Induced earthquake and liquefaction hazards in Oklahoma, USA: Constraints from InSAR. Remote Sensing of Environment, 218, 1-12.

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Year Published: 2018

Sensor suite: The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Instrumentation Testing Suite

To standardize parameters used in seismometer testing and calibration and to make these algorithms accessible to the seismological community, we have developed a new seismometer testing software package called Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) Sensor Test Suite. This software is written in Java and makes use of Seismological Exchange for...

Kearns, A.; Ringler, Adam T.; Holland, James; Storm, Tyler; Wilson, David C.; Anthony, Robert E.
Kearns, A., A. T. Ringler, J. Holland, T. Storm, D. C. Wilson, and R. E. Anthony (2018). Sensor Suite: The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory instrumentation testing suite, Seismological Research Letters, doi:10.1785/0220180174.

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Year Published: 2018

Developing hydro-meteorological thresholds for shallow landslide initiation and early warning

Consistent relations between shallow landslide initiation and associated rainfall characteristics remain difficult to identify, due largely to the complex hydrological and geological processes causing slopes to be predisposed to failure and those processes that subsequently trigger failures. Considering the importance of hillslope hydrology for...

Mirus, Benjamin B.; Morphew, Michael D.; Smith, Joel B.
Mirus, B.B., Morphew, M.D., and Smith, J.B., 2018, Developing Hydro-Meteorological Thresholds for Shallow Landslide Initiation and Early Warning. Water, 10(9), 1274, doi:10.3390/w10091274.

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Year Published: 2018

Holocene fault reactivation in the eastern Cascades, Washington

Significant uncertainty remains concerning how and where crustal shortening occurs throughout the eastern Cascade Range in Washington State. Using light detection and ranging (lidar) imagery, we identified an ∼5‐km‐long">∼5‐km‐long lineament in Swakane canyon near Wenatchee, roughly coincident with a...

Carlson, Benjamin L.; Schermer, Elizabeth R.; Amos, Colin B.; Stephenson, William J.; Sherrod, Brian; Mahan, Shannon A.
Carlson, B.M., Schermer, E.R., Amos, C.B., Stephenson, W.J., Sherrod, B.L., and Mahan, S.A., 2018 Holocene fault reactivation in the eastern Cascades, Washington, Bulletin Seismological Society of America, https://doi.org/10.1785/0120170228

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Year Published: 2018

Identifying physics‐based thresholds for rainfall‐induced landsliding

Most regional landslide warning systems utilize empirically derived rainfall thresholds that are difficult to improve without recalibration to additional landslide events. To address this limitation, we explored the use of synthetic rainfall to generate thousands of possible storm patterns and coupled them with a physics‐based hydrology and slope...

Thomas, Matthew A.; Mirus, Benjamin B.; Collins, Brian D.
Thomas, M. A., Mirus, B. B., & Collins, B. D. (2018). Identifying physics‐based thresholds for rainfall‐induced landsliding. Geophysical Research Letters. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GL079662

The Southwest Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Gulf Coast and the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Southwest Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

Filter Total Items: 159
Hydro techs record initial sensor reading prior to sensor cleaning and recalibration.
March 31, 2017

Hydro techs inspecting water quality sensor

Several New Mexico Water Science Center staff attended Continuous Water Quality Training, taught by Mike Nyman of the Texas Water Science Center and Lauren Sherson of the New Mexico Water Science Center.  The course covered rationale for collecting continuous water quality data; field techniques for in-situ and continuous water quality data collection; and standard USGS 

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Hydro techs clean a water quality sensor prior to deployment
March 31, 2017

Hydro techs clean a water quality sensor prior to deployment

 Hydrologic technicians Joe Beman, Hal Nelson, and Kate Allison, and course instructor Mike Nyman clean a water quality sensor prior to redeployment at a Water Quality Field Course put on by the New Mexico Water Science Center.

Snowshoeing in the Sandia Mountains in Albuquerque, New Mexico as part of a snowpack hydrology study
January 24, 2017

Snowpack Study

Student Aurelia Mitchell recently trekked up into the Sandia Mountains to collect snow data as part of an ongoing hydrologic study in the East Mountains, conducted in cooperation with the Bernalillo County Public Works Division. They measured the depth and density of the snow in several locations to determine the snow/water equivalent. This information can be used in the

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Hydro techs snowshoeing in the Sandia Mountains as part of a snowpack hydrology study.
January 24, 2017

Snowpack Study

Hydrologist Ryan McCutcheon and student Aurelia Mitchell recently trekked up into the Sandia Mountains in Albuquerque, New Mexico to collect snow data as part of an ongoing hydrologic study in the East Mountains, conducted in cooperation with the Bernalillo County Public Works Division. They measured the depth and density of the snow in several locations to determine the

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Loveland Pass Colorado
December 31, 2016

Loveland Pass Colorado

A view of the highway going over Loveland Pass in Colorado.

A sunset in western Loveland, Colorado.
December 31, 2016

Sunset in Western Loveland, CO

A sunset in western Loveland, Colorado. 

Dissected bat guano pellet showing antennae, eyes, and body fragments of midges.
December 31, 2016

Dissected bat guano pellet showing antennae, eyes, and body parts

Dissected guano pellet showing antennae, eyes, and body fragments of midges. 

Photo of USGS research boat conducting science on the Great Salt Lake.
December 31, 2016

USGS research boat conducting science on the Great Salt Lake.

USGS scientist Robert Baskin takes a boat out on the Great Salt Lake to conduct research. 

Baskin is being awarded with a 2016 Governor’s Medal for Science and Technology. Gov. Gary R. Herbert will present awards to 11 individuals and one company at the 30th anniversary awards dinner on January 18, 2017. Baskin is best known for his innovative research on Great Salt

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Image shows coal being loaded into trucks at a coal mine
December 31, 2016

Loading Coal in the Trapper Mine

Coal is loaded into trucks at the Trapper Mine in northwest Colorado.

December 1, 2016

New Breach Allows Flow on the Great Salt Lake

The new Great Salt Lake breach was opened on Dec. 1 by the Union Pacific Railroad Company. This created a new opening between the north and the south arm of the lake, allowing water to flow between the two sides. This time-lapse video shows the breach opening, which took about two hours. Before the new breach was opened, the north arm of the Great Salt Lake was at an

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View of the Rio Brazos river with green trees and blue sky as the backdrop.
October 17, 2016

Rio Brazos near Tierra Amarilla, NM

Hydrologic technician Lindsay Hastings took this photo of the Rio Brazos near Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico during her first field trip as a streamgager with the New Mexico Water Science Center. Did you know that New Mexico was the birth place of streamgaging? The USGS began collecting streamflow information in 1889 when the first streamgage was established on the Rio Grande

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Photo of USGS scientist Jayne Belnap examining instrumentation to measure photosynthetic rates of biocrusts.
September 29, 2016

USGS scientist Jayne Belnap examines instruments to measure biocrust

USGS scientist Jayne Belnap examines instrumentation to measure photosynthetic rates of biocrusts.

Arid and semiarid ecosystems are expected to experience significant changes in temperature and precipitation patterns, which may affect soil organisms in ways that cause surfaces to become lighter in color and thus reflect more sunlight, according to a new USGS study

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Filter Total Items: 76
USGS
July 7, 2016

Alaska is a major producer of base and precious metals and has a high potential for additional undiscovered mineral resources. However, discovery is hindered by Alaska’s vast size, remoteness and rugged terrain. New methods are needed to overcome these obstacles in order to evaluate Alaska’s geology and mineral resource potential.

Painting - Denali in Midsummer
June 21, 2016

The U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new compilation of landscape-scale sediment and soil geochemical data for Alaska. This was last completed nearly 40 years ago in 1978, but the new effort uses modern modeling and analysis techniques to map 68 elements across a newly developed and updated geochemical atlas of Alaska.

Permafrost area, Beaver Creek, Alaska.
June 20, 2016

The thawing of the planet’s permafrost is replumbing arctic environments, creating several hydrologic consequences and possibly some opportunities according to a new study published in Vadose Zone.

USGS: Science for a changing world
June 17, 2016

Science diplomacy is the use of collaborations among nations to address common scientific problems and to build constructive international partnerships. Researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, Colorado recently used the science diplomacy tactic to initiate a ground-breaking international collaboration with the Nation of Cuba. 

Image shows sunrise through a drill rig
June 8, 2016

This is the second-largest assessment of potential shale & tight gas resources that the USGS has ever conducted.

Photo of the National Water Quality Lab building
May 16, 2016

Forty years ago, water samples from around the country started flowing into the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Quality Laboratory in Colorado.

USGS science for a changing world
May 10, 2016

The U.S. Geological Survey is celebrating the success of three distinguished researchers who are recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). This award is the highest recognition granted by the United States government to scientists and engineers in the early stages of their research careers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 17, 2016

The ongoing resource, climate, hazards and environmental issues of the United States are addressed in a new U.S. Geological Survey product, providing an overview of the USGS Mineral Resources Program's multidisciplinary science.

USGS
January 20, 2016

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources will determine changes in the amount of groundwater stored in the Mesilla Basin aquifer in and around Las Cruces by precisely measuring differences in the acceleration of gravity at several locations the week of January 18.

Image: 2011 Great Salt Lake Breach at Lakeside, Utah
December 29, 2015

The north arm of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) has reached a new historic low. According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands (FFSL), the lake's water level reached an elevation of 4,191.6 feet last month, one foot lower than the previous record.

The Southwest Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Gulf Coast and the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Southwest Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

Filter Total Items: 215