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River Research and Applications
Date Published: April 13, 2012

Predicting ecological flow regime at ungaged sites: A comparison of methods

Nineteen ecologically relevant streamflow characteristics were estimated using published rainfall–runoff and regional regression models for six sites with observed daily streamflow records in Kentucky. The regional regression model produced median estimates closer to the observed median for all but two characteristics. The variability of predictions from both models was generally less than the...

Quality of Shallow Groundwater and Drinking Water in the Mississippi Embayment-Texas Costal Uplands Aquifer System
Date Published: July 14, 2009

Quality of Shallow Groundwater and Drinking Water in the Mississippi Embayment-Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System and the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, South-Central United States, 1994–2004

The Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system is an important source of drinking water, providing about 724 million gallons per day to about 8.9 million people in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and Alabama. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer ranks third in the Nation for total withdrawals of which more than 98...

Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study - Map
Date Published: January 21, 2009

Digital Hydrogeologic Surface and Thickness of the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS)

Short Title: MERAS Framework

Project Chief: Rheannon Hart

Cooperator: U.S. Geological Survey Office of Ground-Water Resources Program

Project Time Frame: January 2006 - 2009

A hydrogeologic framework for a ground-water flow model is under development as part...

Contacts: Rheannon M Hart
Lower Mississippi Rivers and Streams Assessment Map
Date Published: January 1, 2009

Lower Mississippi River National Rivers and Streams Assessment

Short Title: Mississippi River NRSA

Project Chief: Billy Justus

Cooperator: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Project Time Frame: 2008 - 2009

The USGS Arkansas and Missouri Water Science Centers (WSC) are conducting a study for the U.S. Environmental...

Contacts: Billy G Justus
Filter Total Items: 63
USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2006

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and an associated database that inventory 36 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the central United States.

USGS
August 7, 2006

Hurricane impacts, invasive species, wildlife disease, and the effect of fire on ecosystems are among the topics that scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will discuss as they meet with other leading ecological scientists, educators, and policy-makers from around the globe at the 91st Ecological Society of America meeting in Memphis, Tenn. Aug. 6-11.

USGS
August 1, 2005

In its latest report on water use in the United States, the USGS looked at the nation's dependence on ground water. The report entitled Estimated Withdrawals from Principal Aquifers in the United States, 2000, provides details of ground-water withdrawals and use from principal aquifers in each state.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey alerted state and federal agencies today to the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Maryland due to anticipated heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan.

USGS
September 16, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey alerted state and federal agencies today to the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Maryland due to anticipated heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 1, 2004

A new map from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Central United States Earthquake Consortium shows that Central States, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana are among the most seismically active states east of the Rocky Mountains. More than 800 earthquakes are cataloged on the map that depicts the locations of earthquakes large enough to be felt, since 1699.

USGS
April 1, 2004

A new map from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Central United States Earthquake Consortium shows that Central States, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana are among the most seismically active states east of the Rocky Mountains. More than 800 earthquakes are cataloged on the map that depicts the locations of earthquakes large enough to be felt, since 1699.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 10, 2003

The USGS has just completed a geologically based assessment of the technically recoverable, undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. This area includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama.