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Southwest

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The Southwest Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Gulf Coast and the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Southwest Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

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Image shows the Colorado River cutting through the Grand Canyon
March 7, 2016

Colorado River through the Grand Canyon

A view of the Grand Canyon, with the Great Unconformity visible. Credit: Alex Demas, USGS.

Attribution: Southwest
USGS scientist collects a groundwater-level measurement in Freeport, Texas. 
January 31, 2016

Collecting a groundwater-level measurement in Freeport, Texas

USGS hydrologist Jason Ramage collects a groundwater-level measurement using a steel tape in Freeport, Texas. 

A new interactive web application illustrates how groundwater, sediment compaction and land-elevation change are related in the Houston-Galveston region in Texas. 

Image shows a scanning electron microscope image of finchite
December 31, 2015

Scanning Electron Microscope Image of Finchite

A scanning electron microscope image of the newly discovered mineral finchite. The Denver Microbeam Lab provided this scan of finchite in order to help describe and identify the mineral as a new one. Finchite is a uranium mineral first observed in Martin County, Texas. Read more about our uranium research here

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Image shows a sample of the mineral finchite with a chair wheel for scale
December 31, 2015

Finchite Mineral

A sample of finchite, a newly discovered uranium mineral. Finchite is the yellow material on the surface of the rock. Finchite is found in the late Pleistocene sediments deposited during the Illinoian glacial stage. It was first observed in Martin County, Texas. Read more about our uranium research here

Image shows a sample of finchite with a quarter for scale
December 31, 2015

Finchite Mineral

A sample of finchite, a newly discovered uranium mineral. Finchite is the yellow material on the surface of the rock. Finchite is found in the late Pleistocene sediments deposited during the Illinoian glacial stage. It was first observed in Martin County, Texas. Read more about our uranium research here

Image shows a man examine rock layers
December 31, 2015

USGS Scientist Examining Texas Rock Layers for Finchite Minerals

USGS scientist Bradley Van Gosen examines rock layers for the newly discovered mineral finchite near Lamesa, Texas. Van Gosen was the first to recognize the existence of the new mineral, which was named for long-time USGS uranium geologist Warren Finch. Read more about our uranium research here

Image shows a dry creek bed with two men standing on the banks
December 31, 2015

USGS Scientists Seeking Finchite by the Sulfur Springs Draw in Texas

Between Lamesa and Big Spring, Texas, runs the Sulfur Spring Draw, a dry creek. It's the site of an economic calcrete-type uranium deposit, the Sulfur Springs Draw Deposit, where a new mineral was discovered in 2015. The mineral, first observed by USGS scientist Bradley Van Gosen, is a uranium-mineral named finchite after long-time USGS uranium geologist Warren Finch. Read

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Photo of Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015
December 31, 2015

Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015

USGS crews had two research vessels out measuring streamflow on the Mississippi River at St. Louis on New Years Eve, 2015. 

Photo of Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015
December 31, 2015

Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015

USGS scientist Chris Rowden drives a research vessel measuring streamflow alongside another field crew on the Mississippi River at St. Louis.

Photo of Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015
December 31, 2015

Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015

USGS crews had two research vessels out measuring streamflow on the Mississippi River at St. Louis on New Years Eve, 2015. USGS scientists Eric Looper and Jason Carron are one of many USGS field crews out in the floodwaters over the holiday.

Photo of Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015
December 31, 2015

Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015

USGS scientists Chris Rowden, Larry Buschmann and Bob Holmes were on the Mississippi River at St. Louis taking streamflow measurements on New Years Eve, 2015. This information is critical to the National Weather Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and emergency managers in making flood predictions and response.

Photo of Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015
December 31, 2015

Flooding on Mississippi River in December 2015

USGS scientists Chris Rowden, Larry Buschmann and Bob Holmes were on the Mississippi River at St. Louis taking streamflow measurements on New Years Eve, 2015. This information is critical to the National Weather Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and emergency managers in making flood predictions and response.

Filter Total Items: 134
USGS
March 6, 2015

Reactivated faults that have produced thousands of Oklahoma earthquakes are capable of causing larger seismic events, according to U.S. Geological Survey research published today in Geophysical Research Letters.

USGS
February 17, 2015

U.S. Geological Survey senior scientist Dr. Jill Baron has been named the new Director of the North American Nitrogen Center, one of five globally distributed centers of the International Nitrogen Initiative (INI).

USGS
December 18, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s South Central Climate Science Center is awarding nearly $550,000 to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

USGS
December 18, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Southwest Climate Science Center is awarding nearly a million dollars to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

USGS
December 18, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s North Central Climate Science Center in Fort Collins, Colorado, is awarding nearly $400,000 to universities and other partners.

USGS
December 16, 2014

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains Aquifer. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer for two separate periods: from 1950 – the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development – to 2013, and 2011 to 2013.

Image: Mammoth Fossils
November 24, 2014

Four years ago, a bulldozer operator turned over some bones during construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado. Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were those of a juvenile Columbian mammoth, setting off a frenzy of excavation, scientific analysis, and international media attention.

USGS
October 29, 2014

Wichita’s water-use strategy has helped preserve the Equus Beds aquifer during the recent drought of 2011-12, according to a new report released by the U.S. Geological Survey and prepared in cooperation with the city of Wichita.

USGS
October 7, 2014

Basins in the Sandia and Manzano Mountains at risk for a rainfall-generated debris-flow following a wildfire are identified by a new method for estimating post-fire erosion hazards before a wildfire actually burns, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.

USGS
August 7, 2014

Beginning around August 7, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will be drilling “sentinel” wells at the first of three locations in the Trumbull Village neighborhood in Albuquerque to provide early alerts for groundwater contamination.

USGS
July 21, 2014

Groundwater pumping has produced significant changes in water levels below some parts of the Albuquerque metropolitan area, according to two new reports published by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

USGS
June 16, 2014

A recent study conducted by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciencesfound that a combination of climate and human activities (diversion and reservoirs) controls the movement of carbon in two large western river basins, the Colorado and the Missouri Rivers. 

The Southwest Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Gulf Coast and the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Southwest Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

Filter Total Items: 219