Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions

The success of the GLRI program requires accountability, education, monitoring, evaluations, communication, and partnerships to succeed. The information obtained from GLRI efforts needs to be based on the best available science and assembled and communicated consistently to decision makers. It allows them to assess ecosystem conditions and to track restoration progress. Outreach and education are also crucial in the effort to restore the Great Lakes. As part of GLRI, USGS is tracking progress and working strategically with partners to support Lakewide Management Plans, to characterize rivermouth ecosystems, and to provide forecasting tools for stream ecosystem management.

Filter Total Items: 12
Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative - Lake Ontario, 2018

Environmental organizations from the United States and Canada have teamed up each year, as part of the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) program, to assess conditions in one of the five Great Lakes. . Each year, the survey focuses on a series of research areas, such as phosphorus and nitrogen input and movement through the food web, phytoplankton and zooplankton populations...

Contacts: Brian Lantry, James Watkins, Christopher M. Pennuto, Jacques Rinchard, Ph.D.
Date published: November 21, 2019
Status: Active

Areas of Concern: 18 Mile Creek AOC - Fish Community Characterizations

The downstream-most section of Eighteen Mile Creek (also listed as the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) superfund site EIGHTEENMILE CREEK LOCKPORT, NY), a tributary to the south shore of Lake Ontario in New York, was designated as an Area of Concern (AOC) because water quality and bed sediments were contaminated by past industrial and municipal discharges, waste disposal, and...

Contacts: Scott George
Date published: November 20, 2019
Status: Active

Areas of Concern: New York Statewide Fish Collection - Contaminants in fish from the Buffalo River AOC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Department of Health (NYSDOH), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) sampled fish from the Buffalo River AOC during summer 2017 to help determine if current fish-consumption advisories are appropriate and if residue data support or do not support removal of the “Restrictions on Fish and Wildlife Consumption” beneficial...

Contacts: Barry P Baldigo
Date published: November 12, 2019
Status: Active

Areas of Concern: Niagara River

USGS scientists participated in several projects supporting work in the Niagara River Area of Concern including: 1) Evaluating toxicity in Benthos Sediment, 2) Tracking PCB Sources in the AOC, and Identifying Source Areas Contributing to Contaminants Found in Fish Tissue. 

Date published: October 30, 2019
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Lake Erie Central Basin Hypoxia Monitoring

The recently reauthorized Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement calls for a reduction in severity and spatial extent of hypoxia (low oxygen zones) with emphasis on Lake Erie’s Central Basin.

Contacts: Richard Kraus
Date published: July 29, 2019
Status: Active

Science in the Great Lakes Mapper

The Science in the Great Lakes (SiGL) Mapper is a map-based discovery tool that spatially displays basin-wide multidisciplinary monitoring and research activities conducted by both USGS and partners from all five Great Lakes. It was designed to help Great Lakes researchers and managers strategically plan, implement, and analyze monitoring and restoration activities by providing easy access to...

Contacts: Bruce R Droster
Date published: September 14, 2018
Status: Active

Development and application of a robot-assisted computer vision system to map Great Lakes bottom habitats and biology

Lake bottom environments are critical zones of interface between geology and biological processes that support health ecosystems and human well-being.  Over the past thirty years, Great Lake food webs have become dominated by bottom dwelling invasive species and nuisance algae, that are poorly mapped and understood.  USGS is developing a suite of new technologies to map habitat, invasive...

Date published: January 11, 2018
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Supporting Lake Partnerships

USGS supports Federal, State, and local and Tribal partner agencies with implementing aspects of Great Lakes Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) goals involving restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. This support includes coordination with Tribal natural-resources departments, USEPA, and other Federal, State, and local agencies. USGS scientists and managers participate in...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: November 21, 2017
Status: Active

Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI)

Since 2002, environmental organizations from the United States and Canada have teamed up each year to assess conditions in one of the five Great Lakes. This program is called the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI). Each year, the survey focuses on a series of research areas, such as phosphorus and nitrogen input and movement through the food web, phytoplankton and zooplankton...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: October 13, 2017
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Data, Information, and Tools to Support GLRI Activities

The USGS Science in the Great Lakes (SiGL) Mapper is a map-based discovery tool that displays basin-wide multi-disciplinary monitoring and research activities conducted by both USGS and partners across all five Great Lakes. The mapper, a Data Management System, and other tools are easy to access and help scientists and managers strategically plan, implement, and analyze their Great Lakes...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: October 10, 2017
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Apostle Island Monitoring

Year-round realtime monitoring of nearshore weather, currents, and water quality in Chequamegon Bay, Lake Superior. The monitoring station is on a historic lighthouse to allow year-round monitoring and the data will be linked into the GLOS network. A time-lapse camera provides images every 15 minutes to the public and researchers. Winds and seiche affect currents and stratification in the bay...

Date published: September 15, 2016
Status: Completed

Support Of Lake Erie Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP) Activities Through Coordination, Data Collection, Data Dissemination, And Data Interpretation

This project manages USGS Lake Erie LaMP (Lakewide Management Plan) activities. These activities include quarterly conference calls on USGS-related activities; attending semiannual LaMP Workgroup meetings; collection of monitoring metadata from Federal, state, local, and non-governmental organizations for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)...

Contacts: Daniel Button