Hurricane Harvey

Filter Total Items: 41
August 24, 2017

USGS scientist Darwin Ockerman installs a storm-tide sensor at Packery Channel near Corpus Christi, Texas. 

August 24, 2017

USGS scientist Charles Hartmann installs a storm-tide sensor in preparation for Hurricane Harvey in Carancahua Bay, Texas. 

August 24, 2017

USGS storm-tide sensor installed in preparation for Hurricane Harvey near Matagorda, Texas.

August 25, 2017

USGS storm-tide sensor installed in preparation for Hurricane Harvey on St. Charles Bay near Interstate 35.  

August 26, 2017

Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the Gulf Coast of Texas as a Category 4 hurricane on the night of August 25, 2017. It then stalled over southeastern Texas as a tropical storm and continued to creep northeast over Louisiana.

August 26, 2017

USGS scientists Vidal Mendoza and Brian Petri take flood measurements at Fifteenmile Creek near Weser, Texas on August 26. The crew used a power measurement technique, since acoustic measurements will not work due to a large amount of sediment and vegetation in the floodwaters. Photo by Mark Schroeder, USGS.

August 26, 2017

In addition to staff that conduct field measurements of flooding conditions, others monitor information indoors. Here, USGS scientist Jeff East is monitoring streamflow and flooding from Hurricane Harvey.

 

August 26, 2017

Photo of a USGS streamgage on the west side of Houston during Hurricane Harvey. Find more information from this site information here:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=08072680

 

August 26, 2017

USGS scientist Matthew Barnes makes the highest streamflow measurement ever recorded at Eagle Ferry Rd near Anahuac, Texas. Find more
information from this site information here: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=08042558

August 26, 2017

USGS scientist Mackenzie Mullins takes flood measurements at Berry Bayou in Houston, Texas.

 

August 27, 2017

USGS field crews made multiple record high flood measurements on Aug. 27, including downstream of Addicks and Barker dam. Flood measurements near Addicks and Barker dam are critical for making public safety decisions, as 1.2 million people live downstream.

USGS hydrologic technicians Eric Boeding and Robert Ellis measured the height and speed of floodwaters at the USGS streamgage site at Buffalo Bayou in Piney Point, Texas. This is the downstream control point for Addicks and Barker dam releases.

August 28, 2017

Planning meeting at the USGS Gulf Coast Office.

August 29, 2017

USGS scientist Tom Pistillo services the streamgage at Addicks Reservoir to ensure that accurate reservoir water-level data are being measured, which are critical for helping the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Harris County Flood Control District make informed reservoir operation decisions.

August 29, 2017

USGS field crew measure reservoir water-level data at Addicks Reservoir, which are critical for helping the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers make informed reservoir operation decisions.

August 29, 2017

USGS scientist Tom Pistillo wades through the waters of Barker Reservoir to ensure accurate reservoir water-level data are being measured, which are critical for helping the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Harris County Flood Control District make informed reservoir operation decisions.

August 29, 2017

USGS field crew measure reservoir water-level data at Addicks Reservoir, which are critical for helping the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers make informed reservoir operation decisions.

August 30, 2017

USGS scientist Alec MacDonald takes flood measurements on the Guadalupe River in Victoria, Texas.

August 31, 2017

USGS scientist Lisa Ashmore services a water-quality monitor on Lake Houston. These instruments stayed afloat and collected data throughout Harvey. 

August 31, 2017

USGS scientist Jimmy Hopkins repairs a streamgage downstream of Addicks reservoir at Buffalo Bayou after flooding from Hurricane Harvey. This gauge is normally accessed on land from a platform on the side of a bridge.

August 31, 2017

A peek into a USGS planning meeting to coordinate water-quality sampling efforts in response to Harvey. This sampling effort is part of the federal government’s broad efforts to ensure public health and to support the state, tribal, and local response to the storm

August 31, 2017

USGS scientist Lisa Ashmore services a water-quality monitor on Lake Houston. These instruments stayed afloat and collected data throughout the storm.

August 31, 2017

USGS scientists Lisa Ashmore and Lee Bodkin collect water-quality samples on Lake Houston in response to the high flow conditions that resulted from Harvey. 

August 31, 2017

Hurricane Harvey made landfall on August 25th. Over the next few days, record rain totals had devastated the area.

At the USGS EROS Center, we study land change, operate the Landsat satellites, and maintain the longest, continuously acquired collection of images of the Earth's land surface.

USGS EROS Center (https://eros.usgs.gov/)

August 31, 2017

A USGS field crew takes water-quality samples on Lake Houston following Harvey.

September 5, 2017

Location 1. Elevated water levels during Hurricane Harvey reached the base but did not overtop the ~5m high dunes in Mustang Island, Texas, leading to dune erosion. The predicted probability of dune erosion for this section of coast was 99%.

September 5, 2017

Extensive flooding inundated the Gulf Coast of Texas after Hurricane Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane on August 25, 2017. Among the many waterways in southeastern Texas that exceeded flood stage was the Brazos River, which flows past Houston to its west and to the Gulf of Mexico at Freeport.

September 5, 2017

USGS scientist Vidal Mendoza surveying high water marks from storm surge from Hurricane Harvey near Port Aransas, Texas.

September 5, 2017

Location 4. Sand dunes along this stretch of coast in Sargent, Texas, were overwashed by large waves during the storm. Sand from the beach and dunes is covering the roadway behind the dunes and which may be impassable. The predicted probability of overwash in this area was 94%.

September 5, 2017

Location 2. Multiple breaches were cut through the south end of San Jose Island, Texas, just north of Aransas Pass. The predicted probability of inundation was low, only 21%, however the probability of overwash was 87%. When water levels are elevated through several tidal cycles, as was likely the case during Hurricane Harvey, the dunes can continue to erode through time and may even erode completely.

September 5, 2017

USGS scientist Alec McDonald surveying high water marks from storm surge from Hurricane Harvey at Packery Channel near Corpus Christi, Texas.

September 5, 2017

Locatinon 3. At the north end of Matagorda Island, Texas, storm waves and surge inundated a low-lying section of the coastline causing a 340-meter wide breach. The predicted probability of inundation here was 90%

September 5, 2017

Location 5. Erosion of the beach in front of this developed area in Surfside, Texas, occurred as a result of elevated water levels during the storm. The vegetated dune at the bottom of the image was overwashed with sand being moved between and behind the oceanfront homes. The predicted probability of overwash here was 88%.

September 8, 2017

USGS scientist David Rodriguez records high water marks from storm surge following Harvey near Corpus Christi, Texas. 

September 8, 2017

Hurricane Harvey dumped over 50 inches of rain near Houston, leaving extensive flooding throughout the area.

At the USGS EROS Center, we study land change, operate the Landsat satellites, and maintain the longest, continuously acquired collection of images of the Earth's land surface.

USGS EROS Center (https://eros.usgs.gov/)

September 8, 2017

USGS scientist David Rodriguez records high water marks from storm surge near Corpus Christi, Texas. 

September 11, 2017

USGS scientist Steve Hannes marks high water marks along the Colorado River after flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Wharton County, Texas.

September 11, 2017

USGS scientist Steve Hannes marks high water marks along the Colorado River after flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Wharton County, Texas.

September 11, 2017

USGS scientist Steve Hannes marks high water marks along the Colorado River after flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Wharton County, Texas.

September 11, 2017

USGS scientist Steve Hannes marks high water marks along the Colorado River after flooding from Harvey in Matagorda County, Texas.

2017 (approx.)

Before a hurricane, USGS Scientists undertake a data collection effort of a grand scale. They install a temporary mobile network of sensors along the coasts to collect additional data on the intensity of storm surge, one of the most dangerous elements of a hurricane. This effort provides critical information that allows various USGS partners and emergency responders to make better informed decisions during and after these extreme weather events. https://www.usgs.gov/hurricanes