Florida

Filter Total Items: 178
Date published: May 2, 2016
Status: Active

Detection, tracking, and removal of non-native marine fishes in Florida

Thirty-four species of non-native marine fishes have been documented in Florida, and their distributions are currently being tracked via the US Geological Survey’s Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (USGS-NAS) database.

Date published: May 2, 2016
Status: Active

Impacts of Non-Native Fishes in the Florida Everglades

The Florida Everglades is the largest wetland ecosystem in the United States and supports a diverse flora and fauna, including many rare species.

Date published: April 25, 2016
Status: Active

Advanced Technological Solutions in Support of Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystem Science: Joint Ecosystem Modeling (JEM)

The JEM Biological Database offers secure data storage in relational databases, as well as web applications to manage, search, analyze, and report on captured data.

Date published: April 25, 2016

Collaborative Development of Ecological Forecasting Model and Data Manipulation Software: Everglades National Park, South Florida Natural Resources Center (SFNRC)

The goal of the Advanced Applications Team’s partnership with SFNRC is to facilitate the use of scientific research findings in restoration and land management decisions.

Contacts: Kevin Suir
Date published: April 18, 2016
Status: Completed

Baseline Aquatic Contamination and Endocrine Status in Resident Fish Populations of Biscayne National Park and in the Adjacent Coastal Environment

As part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, water managers are planning to use treated wastewater from the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) to supplement the canal waters that will be used to rehydrate wetlands adjacent to the Biscayne National Park (Park).

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Population Demography and Food Web Analysis of Large Aquatic Salamanders (Siren and Amphiuma) in North Florida

Understanding amphibian's life-histories can help predict how they may persist in aquatic habitats in the face of droughts and other climate change-associated events. 

Date published: April 17, 2016

Socio-Ecological Conservation Targets for the Peninsular Florida Landscape Conservation Cooperative

Peninsular Florida has a high density of species and ecosystems of conservation concern, as well as many threats to the persistence of native species and their habitats. USGS worked closely with the Peninsular Florida Landscape Conservation Cooperative to define conservation targets to help meet conservation goals. 

Date published: April 17, 2016

Peninsular Florida Landscape Conservation Cooperative (PFLCC) Climate Scenarios and Species Vulnerability Assessment

Peninsular Florida is one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change in the United States. With complex socioeconomic and ecology dynamics and a large number of governing agencies involved in conservation planning, USGS worked to created an appropriate framework for landscape conservation cooperative-scale decision-making across current conservation planning agencies and jurisdictions...

Date published: April 17, 2016

Winter Manatee Foraging Behavior and the Decline of Seagrass Beds in the Northern Indian River Lagoon

With high numbers of manatees using the Florida Power and Light power plant warm water refuge during winter, their impact on the seagrass beds in the Indian River Lagoon is considered an important indicator of the long-term capacity of the area to support the manatees. USGS is working with partners to investigate the spatial extent and intensity of manatee use of seagrass beds in the area. ...

Contacts: James Reid
Date published: April 17, 2016

Mangrove Migration Network

At the poleward marsh-mangrove ecotone, mangrove abundance and coverage is winter temperature-sensitive in that it oscillates in response to the frequency, duration, and/or intensity of extreme winter temperatures. Future winter climate change is expected to facilitate poleward mangrove range expansion at the expense of salt marshes in Texas, Louisiana, and parts of Florida. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Life History Characterization and Host Fish Identification for Federally Listed and Imperiled Freshwater Mussel Species in the Suwannee River Basin in Georgia and Florida

Freshwater mussels are considered the most imperiled group of animals in the United States. These animals provide valuable ecological services by filtering water, sequestering nutrients, and providing forage for migratory birds, small mammals, and turtles. They also have a unique and complex life cycle that makes them especially vulnerable to human disturbances. It includes a parasitic larval...