New Hampshire

Filter Total Items: 18
Date published: June 19, 2018

List of projects

Our projects listed by topics or themes.

Date published: May 25, 2018

New England WSC Seminar series

Introduction

The New England WSC has initiated a series of seminars to highlight diverse hydrographic assignments.

These seminars feature applications and speakers from different disciplines and are intended to share success stories from users who have solved real world problems.

Contacts: Matt Ely
Date published: May 22, 2018
Status: Active

Preliminary research into the causes of iron fouling in water at roadway construction sites

The USGS and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation are conducting preliminary research into the causes of iron fouling in water at roadway construction sites where blasted bedrock is used as on-site fill material.

Date published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Development of Flood Insurance Maps in New England

FEMA has requested USGS expertise in hydraulics, hydrology, and mapping to general Flood Insurance Maps for New England.

Date published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Development of streamflow record extension equations in New Hampshire

Currently, there are 16 designated rivers in New Hampshire in need of daily mean streamflow estimates for managing instream flows. Many of New Hampshire’s Designated Rivers have current and/or historical streamflow data that may be used to extend an existing streamgages streamflow record in time through record extension techniques. Evaluating the feasibility of record extension techniques to...

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Banding Laboratory

The Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) is an integrated scientific program established in 1920 supporting the collection, archiving, management and dissemination of information from banded and marked birds in North America.  This information is used to monitor the status and trends of resident and migratory bird populations. Because birds are good indicators of the health of the environment, the...

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards

The overall objective is to improve real-time and scenario-based predictions of coastal change to support management of coastal infrastructure, resources, and safety. Research is part of the  National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project.

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise

This research seeks to objectively determine the relative risks due to future sea-level rise for the U.S. Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Research is part of National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project. 

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Long-Term Coastal Change

Goals of this project include developing and improving coastal-change assessments and supporting long-term planning and decision making to ensure sustainable coastal economies, infrastructure, and ecosystems. Research is part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards...

Date published: January 17, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards

Research to identify areas that are most vulnerable to coastal change hazards including beach and dune erosion, long-term shoreline change, and sea-level rise.

Date published: May 15, 2017

New England WSC seminar series Cosgrove 20170515

NOAA's National Water Model (NWM) represents the next generation of river forecasting by NOAA. The NWM is based on the National Hydrography Dataset at a scale of 1:100,000 and is being developed to provide continuous modeled river flows for all 2 million plus river reaches in the model.

Contacts: Matt Ely
Date published: February 16, 2017

Seabird Research Program

The Seabird Research Program at PWRC is focused on studying the ecology of species present across the Atlantic Coast. This program was a natural progression of PWRC's historic work studying the coastal ecology of wildlife in and around the Chesapeake Bay. We now focus on the three key areas on a variety of species: physiology, avoided bycatch, and movement ecology.