Oregon

Filter Total Items: 38
Date published: March 20, 2018
Status: Active

Tsunamis

The 2004 Indian Ocean, 2010 Chilean, and 2011 Tohoku disasters have shown how tsunamis are significant threats to coastal communities. To help U.S. coastal communities prepare for future tsunamis, we’ve completed projects related to population exposure and sensitivity, pedestrian evacuation modeling, and vertical-evacuation decision support.

A recent article of ours in the ...

Date published: March 20, 2018
Status: Active

Volcanoes

 

As the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption showed, volcanoes pose significant threats to U.S. communities. Potential hazards posed by U.S. volcanoes include tephra falls, pyroclastic flows and surges, VOG, ballistic projectiles, lahar and lava flows. In collaboration with researchers from the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, we have worked on better understanding and communicating community...

Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

WFRC Strategic Plan for Science 2015-2020

This strategic plan establishes a template for our science portfolio for the next five years.

Date published: February 23, 2018
Status: Active

Western Fisheries Research Center Lead Scientists and Areas of Expertise

Scientist - Areas of Expertise

Date published: February 1, 2018
Status: Active

Probability of Streamflow Permanence (PROSPER)

PRObability of Streamflow PERmanence (PROSPER)

Rivers and streams are constantly changing. Streamflows can change throughout the year and between years due to snowmelt, precipitation, diversions, and return flows. . For many streams, these fluctuations determine whether a stream has year-round flow or not.. PROSPER is a project initiated to better understand what causes these...

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise

This research seeks to objectively determine the relative risks due to future sea-level rise for the U.S. Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Research is part of National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project. 

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Long-Term Coastal Change

Goals of this project include developing and improving coastal-change assessments and supporting long-term planning and decision making to ensure sustainable coastal economies, infrastructure, and ecosystems. Research is part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards...

Date published: January 17, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards

Research to identify areas that are most vulnerable to coastal change hazards including beach and dune erosion, long-term shoreline change, and sea-level rise.

Date published: January 9, 2018

FRESC Corvallis Research Group

The Corvallis Research Group (CRG) conducts research to support critical information needs of our tribal, federal, state, and other management partners as part of the larger mission of the USGS. Primarily, Pacific Northwest forest systems are the focus of our research, particularly forest ecosystem dynamics, fish and wildlife habitats, and responses to agents of change such as forest...

Date published: October 30, 2017
Status: Active

Coastal Ecosystem Response to Sea-level Rise

USGS WERC’s Dr. Karen Thorne, her team of reseachers, and her partners are currently taking a local site network approach to describe current and future conditions and projected responses of coastal ecosystems to sea-level rise and other stressors. The Coastal Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (CERCC) program’s goal is to understand how ecosystems vary in their ability to keep up with sea-...

Contacts: Karen Thorne
Date published: October 30, 2017
Status: Active

Ecological Stressors - Rocky Coastlines, Mangroves, Marshes, Droughts, and Storms

Coastal estuaries that contain marshes and mangroves are currently being reshaped by changing ocean and atmospheric conditions through prolong drought, sea-level rise and increased extreme storm events. Many projected increases in sea-level are expected to result in loss of tidal wetlands and their component species. In addition, changing sediment loads, extreme tide and storm events, and...

Contacts: Karen Thorne
Date published: October 30, 2017
Status: Active

Supporting Informed Responses to Sea-Level Rise

To facilitate communication and outreach of sea level rise research results and implications, Dr. Karen Thorne and members of USGS WERC are hosting in-person workshops along the Pacific coast at different sites in Washington, Oregon, and California.

Contacts: Karen Thorne