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Filter Total Items: 99
Date published: November 29, 2018
Status: Active

Assessing the world's inland fisheries- Abigail Lynch

Inland fisheries are important contributors to global food security and poverty alleviation. However, there is no standardized method to monitor and assess the status of inland fisheries. The goal of this project is to assess the vulnerability and resiliency of all major inland fisheries globally through the creation of an interactive assessment tool to be used by fisheries managers.

Date published: November 27, 2018
Status: Active

Peatland responses to centennial and millennial-scale changes in North Pacific hydroclimate- Miriam Jones

This study will examine centennial- to millennial-scale North Pacific hydroclimate variability over the late-glacial and Holocene from Alaskan peatlands using cellulose extraction from peatland plants. Hydroclimate analysis will be coupled with vegetation and carbon dynamics to better understand how peatlands respond to long-term climate variability.

Date published: November 27, 2018
Status: Active

Recreational Fishing as driver of overexploitation in inland waters- Doug Beard

Do fisheries managers know the impacts of improving recreational fishing technology on the populations of fish they manage? The role of gear innovations in recreational fisheries is understudied as a driver of overexploitation in inland waters. Examining technology advances will inform recreational managment.

Date published: November 27, 2018
Status: Active

Estimating national inland recreational fish harvest- Abigail Lynch

While recreational fisheries yield is more than ten times that of commercial yield in inland waters, the U.S. does not currently report any recreational harvest up to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). This project is aimed at using a novel approach to provide a U.S.-wide estimate of recreational inland fish harvest and project it with global change. 

Date published: November 27, 2018
Status: Active

Integrated Modeling and Prediction Division- Stacey Archfield

We are seeking candidates to work on a national synthesis to attribute observed changes in floods and/or develop and test methods to adjust flood-frequency estimates for change. The specific topic of interest within these research themes are negotiable based on the intern’s particular research interests and career goals. 

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Characterizing and dating manganese oxide deposits in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains- Daniel Doctor

Supergene manganese oxides are critical ore deposits that record valuable information about climate and geochemical processes at their time of formation. The intern’s research will focus on characterizing and dating these minerals using scanning electron microscopy and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. 

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Understanding Minerals and Resources through Big Data Science- Gilpin Robinson

This is an opportunity to integrate diverse data sources on mineral deposits, resources, minerals, geology, and spatial data, and apply predictive analytics to discover new insights into the occurrence, distribution, type, and quality of known and undiscovered earth resources. The intern may participate in any combination of these efforts consistent with their background and interests.

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Strategic Communications for Land Remote Sensing- Timothy Stryker

Are you interested in communicating the value of science and technology?  Are you excited about the use of Earth observations to help solve society's most pressing problems?  If so, then come work with the USGS to advance the use of land imaging satellite observations with key stakeholders!

Date published: October 29, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluating the sediment storage and mobility in the estuary/bay/lagoon environment

The focus of this task is to examine the role that marsh and shoreline erosion contribute to the sediment budgets of the adjacent open-water estuarine system. Sediments derived from marsh shoreline erosion generally have higher organic matter content than sediments derived from the erosion of barrier islands or delivered by rivers. Understanding the sediment budget in these estuarine...

Date published: October 29, 2018
Status: Active

Chronological geospatial assessment and quantification of episodic impacts in wetland environments

The goal of this task is to map, characterize, and quantify cumulative episodic event-driven loss in northern Gulf of Mexico coastal wetlands over the past century using available remotely sensed data. Achievement of this goal will provide spatially explicit estimates of wetland loss/gain caused by episodic large-scale drivers versus changes from persistent drivers such as sea-level rise and...

Date published: October 25, 2018
Status: Active

Operationalizing Crowdsourcing and Open Innovation for Emergency Management through Data & Tool Standardization- Sophia Liu

This interagency (USGS, FEMA, USACE) pilot project is a unique opportunity to investigate how to operationalize crowdsourcing and open innovation for emergency management through the standardization of data and tools. Help design a playbook, and organize workshops and hackathons with key innovators and open data experts across the government.

Date published: October 25, 2018
Status: Active

Linking Irma storm signatures to the Holocene sediment record for South Florida- Lynn Wingard

South Florida’s proximity to sea level makes Miami and the Everglades ecosystem vulnerable to storm surge.  Sediment cores document past rates of sea level rise, but past storm signatures are difficult to identify. Development of modern calibration datasets will provide information to interpret past storm records and help urban planners and resource managers prepare for the future.