Unified Interior Regions

States and Territories

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 4,981
USGS science for a changing world logo
November 4, 2009

Greater sage-grouse populations have declined substantially in many areas in the West, though populations in some locations remain relatively stable, according to a comprehensive publication written by federal, state, and non-governmental organizations. The population assessment is one of numerous sage-grouse topics covered in the 24 chapters released today.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 29, 2009

The USGS report is available online. Smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River near Harrisburg, Pa. are exposed to oxygen levels that are low enough to cause stress during the first few months of their lives. Low oxygen and the relatively warm water of the Susquehanna River are likely contributing factors in the die offs of baby smallmouth bass since 2005.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 23, 2009

While most people head to Myrtle Beach for vacation, a group of scientists have been hitting the famous South Carolina beach for years to figure out how to keep the sand from washing away. Although they studied only a limited segment of beach, their work is a model for beach preservation that can apply elsewhere.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 20, 2009

When Pierce County holds its "Shake 'n Quake" earthquake exercise Wednesday and Thursday, the foundation participants will use is a scenario developed by U.S. Geological Survey scientists here.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 17, 2009

Twenty years after the Loma Prieta earthquake caused loss of life and widespread property damage, advances in science, technology and engineering have the San Francisco Bay Area better prepared for the next big earthquake. When the Loma Prieta quake hit just after 5 p.m. October 17, 1989 – 20 years ago Saturday – the digital age was in its infancy.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 17, 2009

Martian caves; Post-wildfire debris flows; Volcano, Earthquake, Landslide, and Tsunami Hazards, Climate Change, Water Quality and More. In this U.S. Geological Survey media tip sheet, we've selected and compressed some of the newest, most exciting science topics that the USGS will present at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 15, 2009

As people in northern California begin to assess damage from the high winds and heavy rain of October 13 and 14, they may wonder what hit them.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2009

On October 17, minutes before the scheduled start of the third game of the 1989 World Series in San Francisco, a magnitude 6.9 earthquake rocked the California coast from Monterey to San Francisco.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2009

Five giant non-native snake species would pose high risks to the health of ecosystems in the United States should they become established here, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report released today.
The USGS report details the risks of nine non-native boa, anaconda and python species that are invasive or potentially invasive in the United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 8, 2009

On October 17, minutes before the scheduled start of the third game of the 1989 World Series in San Francisco, a magnitude 6.9 earthquake rocked the California coast from Monterey to San Francisco. Centered near Loma Prieta peak in the mountains south of San Jose, the quake killed 63 people and caused an estimated $6 billion to $10 billion in property loss.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 6, 2009

Rainstorms this year in the area burned by the Station Fire have the potential to trigger debris flows that may impact neighborhoods at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains as well as areas in Big Tujunga Canyon, Pacoima Canyon, Arroyo Seco, West Fork of the San Gabriel River, and Devils Canyon, according to an assessment released today by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 1, 2009

Florida's upper Peace River can lose large quantities of water each day to sinkholes. This loss makes the river vulnerable to running dry during periods of low rainfall and limits its ability to support ecosystems and to provide water to residents downstream.