Unified Interior Regions

Alaska

The Alaska Region represents a resource-rich, dynamic landscape shaped by volcanos, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers. Here, we conduct research to inform management of Alaska’s extensive natural resources, inform national Arctic energy policy, and provide scientific information to help others understand, respond to, and mitigate impacts from natural hazards.

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Filter Total Items: 207
Date published: March 1, 2018
Status: Active

Sea Ice - Habitat Dynamics

Sea Ice Present, Future and Ice Loss and Wildlife

Contacts: David Douglas
Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Fish and Aquatic Ecology

Fish and aquatic habitats in Alaska support important commercial, sport, and subsistence fisheries and provide forage fish that support wildlife populations.  The USGS Alaska Science Center conducts interdisciplinary research to inform local, state, federal, and international policy makers regarding conservation of fish, aquatic species, and their habitats.  We work collaboratively with...

Date published: January 19, 2018
Status: Active

Research Conducted in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Coastal Plain (1002 Area)

Selected Bibliography of Research Involving USGS and Conducted in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Coastal Plain (1002 Area)

Compiled as of 12/17/2018

Date published: January 19, 2018
Status: Active

Research Conducted in the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska (NPRA)

Selected Bibliography of Research Involving USGS and Conducted in the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska (NPR-A)

Compiled as of 12/17/2018

Date published: January 19, 2018
Status: Active

Broad-scale Research Conducted Across the 1002 Area and the NPR-A of Alaska

Selected Bibliography of Broad-scale Research Involving USGS and Conducted Across the 1002 Area and the NPR-A of Alaska

Compiled as of 12/17/2018

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise

The original national coastal vulnerability index (CVI) assessment was motivated by expected accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and the uncertainty in the response of the coastline to SLR. This research was conducted between 1999 and 2001, and is currently being updated using new data sources and methodology. This original study was part of the ...

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Alaska Science Center Previous Seminars

The USGS Alaska Science Center has a monthly seminar series that runs from October through May.  This series highlights the multiple research programs that are taking place across all disciplines at the center.

Listed below are previous seminars given.

Contacts: Yvette Gillies
Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Long-Term Coastal Change

Goals of this task include developing and improving coastal-change assessments and supporting long-term planning and decision making to ensure sustainable coastal economies, infrastructure, and ecosystems.

Date published: January 10, 2018
Status: Active

USGS Research Vessel Alaskan Gyre

The R/V Alaskan Gyre is a 50-foot fiberglass seiner that has been converted into a versatile research vessel to provide USGS scientists and collaborators with access to remote marine areas of Alaska and serve as a mobile laboratory.  The vessel was built by Ledford Marine of Marysville, Washington in 1989 and is named after the Alaskan Gyre, a series of wind driven currents that...

Date published: December 18, 2017
Status: Active

Polar Bear Maternal Denning

Pregnant polar bears enter maternity dens in October/November, give birth to cubs in December/January, and exit dens in March/April. Historically, most polar bears from the Southern Beaufort Sea (SBS) population constructed maternity dens on the sea ice.  Over the last three decades, as sea ice has become thinner and prone to fragmentation, there has been a landward shift in the distribution...

Date published: December 15, 2017
Status: Active

Distribution and Movements of Polar Bears

Polar bears are tied to the sea ice for nearly all of their life cycle functions. Most important of these is foraging, or access to food. Polar bears almost exclusively eat seals, and they are equally as dependent upon the sea for their nutrition as are seals, whales, and other aquatic mammals. Polar bears are not aquatic, however, and their only access to the seals is from the surface of the...

Filter Total Items: 228
Date published: June 14, 2019

Plasmodium Parasite Infection Data from Mosquitoes Collected in South-central Alaska, 2016

This data set includes two tables associated with a study of Plasmodium parasite infection in mosquitoes collected in south-central Alaska during the summer of 2016. The first table contains data regarding mosquito collection from three sites using CO2 baited CDC light traps. Mosquitoes were sorted and pooled according to collection date, genus, and location and subsequently screened for Plas...

Date published: April 28, 2019

National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, (NPRA) Legacy Seismic Data Archive

The National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, (NPRA) Legacy Data Archive represents one of the largest geological and geophysical data sets held by the U.S. Geological Survey.  Two exploration programs by the U.S. Navy and USGS collected over 12,000 line miles of seismic data and drilled 28 wells.  These programs generated a vast amount of data, analyses, and documents, much of which is presented...

Date published: April 22, 2019

Pacific (Gavia pacifica) and Yellow-billed Loon (G. adamsii) Mark-Resight Encounter History Data; National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, 2011-2014

This data release contains a mark-resight encounter history table for Pacific and Yellow-billed loons from the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska, 2011-2014.

Date published: April 22, 2019

Development of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in Greater-White Fronted Geese (Anser albifrons) for Genetic Stock Identification on Wintering Grounds, 2019

This data set contains a description of 3 mitochondrial DNA and 93 nuclear DNA Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) loci and sequence information developed through double digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) techniques for Greater White-Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) that winter in California.

Date published: April 4, 2019

Sampling, Antimicrobial Resistance Testing, and Genomic Typing of E. coli in Gulls (Larus spp.) on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, 2016

This data set includes information on collections of fecal or cloacal samples from wild gulls (Larus spp.) at four locations on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, USA. Samples were also collected from sockeye salmon harvested as part of the personal-use fisheries on the Kenai and Kasilof Rivers. Samples were screened for Escherichia coli (E. coli) and tested for resistance to multiple antib

Date published: March 26, 2019

Allometrics of Baltic Tellin (Macoma balthica) bivalves from Cook Inlet, AK, and Baie de Somme, France, 2010-2011

This dataset contains two tables of sampling information and size and mass measurements of the Baltic Tellin (Macoma balthica) from sites in Cook Inlet, Alaska, USA, and the Baie de Somme estuary, France.

Date published: March 25, 2019

Bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, and minisparker seismic-reflection datasets collected southwest of Montague Island and southwest of Chenega, Alaska during field activity 2014-622-FA

High-resolution acoustic backscatter data, bathymetry data, single channel minisparker seismic-reflection data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in May of 2014 southwest of Chenega Island and southwest of Montague Island, Alaska. Data were collected aboard the Alaska Department of Fish and Game vessel, R/V Solstice.

Date published: March 21, 2019

Pacific Sand Lance Energy Density, Length, and Age, Prince William Sound, Alaska, 2012-2016

This data set documents the age, length, dry mass energy density, and dry mass of age-0 and age-1 Pacific sand lance captured in Prince William Sound Alaska each July from 2012 to 2016. The analysis of this data was published in von Biela et al. 2019 (doi:10.3354/meps12891).

Date published: March 1, 2019

Inventory Data of Lowland-Breeding Birds and Associated Vegetation Types on the Alaska Peninsula, 2004-2007 - Raw Data

These are raw field data from a stratified random survey to inventory the birds breeding in lowlands (elevation below 100m) of the Alaska Peninsula, during summers 2004-2007. Data were collected at 792 survey points on 52 5-km x 5-km plots. The data are in: 1) four PDF files of digitally scanned original field data forms describing each of the 52 plots, and 2) a ZIP package containi

Date published: March 1, 2019

Inventory Data of Lowland-Breeding Birds and Associated Vegetation Types on the Alaska Peninsula, 2004-2007 - Base Data

These are data from a stratified random survey to inventory the birds breeding in lowlands (elevation below 100m) of the Alaska Peninsula, during summers 2004-2007. Data were collected at 792 points on 52 5-km x 5-km plots. The data are in six tables: 1) geographic coordinates of the bounding corners of each of the 52 plots, 2) geographic coordinates of each of the 792 bird count po

Date published: February 28, 2019

Migratory Timing and Site Use of Marbled Godwits Breeding in Alaska, 2008–2015

This dataset contains migration timing and land-based location information from nine Marbled Godwits (Limosa fedoa beringiae) equipped with solar-powered satellite transmitters on breeding grounds near Ugashik, Alaska, in June of 2008. Transmitters were programmed with a duty cycle of 10 hr on and 48 hr off, yielding 10,858 locations (47-3,490 locations per bird, depending on th

Filter Total Items: 141
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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Homer area, Alaska, with a section on beach changes on Homer Spit: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

The March 27, 1964, earthquake shook the Homer area for about 3 minutes. Land effects consisted of a 2- to 6-foot subsidence of the mainland and Homer Spit, one earthflow at the mouth of a canyon, several landslides on the Homer escarpment and along the sea bluffs, and minor fissuring of the ground, principally at the edges of bluffs and on Homer...

Waller, Roger M.; Stanley, Kirk W.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Homer area, Alaska, with a section on beach changes on Homer Spit: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1966; PP; 542-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Waller, Roger M.; Stanley, Kirk W.

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Year Published: 1966

Geologic effects of the March 1964 earthquake and associated seismic sea waves on Kodiak and nearby islands, Alaska: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Kodiak Island and the nearby islands constitute a mountainous landmass with an aggregate area of 4,900 square miles that lies at the western border of the Gulf of Alaska and from 20 to 40 miles off the Alaskan mainland. Igneous and metamorphic rocks underlie most of the area except for a narrow belt of moderately to poorly indurated rocks...

Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben
Geologic effects of the March 1964 earthquake and associated seismic sea waves on Kodiak and nearby islands, Alaska: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben

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Year Published: 1966

Geomorphic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Martin-Bering Rivers area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, caused widespread geomorphic changes in the Martin-Bering Rivers area-900 square miles of uninhabited mountains, alluvial flatlands, and marshes north of the Gulf of Alaska, and east of the Copper River. This area is at lat 60°30’ N. and long 144°22’ W., 32 miles east of Cordova, and approximately 130 miles...

Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.
Geomorphic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Martin-Bering Rivers area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.

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Year Published: 1966

Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Mesozoic and early Tertiary age form a roughly arcuate pattern in and around Prince William Sound, the epicentral region of the Alaska earthquake of 1964. These rocks include the Valdez Group, a predominantly slate and graywacke sequence of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, and the Orca Group, a younger sequence of...

Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.
Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Case, J. E.; Barnes, D. F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S. L.

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Year Published: 1966

Slide-induced waves, seiching and ground fracturing caused by the earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kenai Lake, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The March 27, 1964, earthquake dislodged slides from nine deltas in Kenai Lake, south-central Alaska. Sliding removed protruding parts of deltas-often the youngest parts-and steepened delta fronts, increasing the chances of further sliding. Fathograms show that debris from large slides spread widely over the lake floor, some reaching the toe of...

McCulloch, David S.
Slide-induced waves, seiching and ground fracturing caused by the earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kenai Lake, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-A; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); McCulloch, David S.

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Year Published: 1966

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: field investigations and reconstruction effort

One of the greatest geotectonic events of our time occurred in southern Alaska late in the afternoon of March 27, 1964. Beneath a leaden sky, the chill of evening was just settling over the Alaskan countryside. Light snow was falling on some communities. It was Good Friday, schools were closed, and the business day was ending. Suddenly without...

Hansen, Wallace R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Schaem, William E.; Lyle, Robert E.; George, Warren; Chance, Genie
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: field investigations and reconstruction effort; 1966; PP; 541; Hansen, Wallace R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Schaem, William E.; Lyle, Robert E.; George, Warren; Chance, Genie

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Year Published: 1966

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

This is the third in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great...

McCulloch, David S.; Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.; Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.; Kachadoorian, Reuben; Ferrians, Oscar J.; Foster, Helen L.; Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; Kirkby, M.J.; Kirkby, Anne V.; Stanley, Kirk W.
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543; McCulloch, David S.; Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.; Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.; Kachadoorian, Reuben; Ferrians, Oscar J., Jr.; Foster, Helen L.; Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; Kirkby, M.J.; Kirkby, Anne V.; Stanley, Kirk W.

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Year Published: 1965

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Anchorage, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, is about 80 miles west-northwest of the epicenter of the March 27 earthquake. Because of its size, Anchorage bore the brunt of property damage from the quake; it sustained greater losses than all the rest of Alaska combined. Damage was caused by direct seismic vibration, by ground cracks, and by landslides. Direct...

Hansen, Wallace R.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Anchorage, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1965; PP; 542-A; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Hansen, Wallace R.

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Year Published: 1965

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Whittier, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

Whittier, Alaska, lying at the western end of Passage Canal, is an ocean terminal of The Alaska Railroad. The earthquake that shook south-central Alaska at 5:36 p.m. (Alaska Standard Time) on March 27, 1964, took the lives of 13 persons and caused more than $5 million worth of damage to Government and private property at Whittier. Seismic motion...

Kachadoorian, Reuben
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Whittier, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1965; PP; 542-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Kachadoorian, Reuben

Filter Total Items: 1,147
Chilkat River bridge
May 30, 2019

Chilkat River bridge

Chilkat River bridge

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge
May 30, 2019

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge

Kashwitna River bridge debris
May 13, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge
May 7, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge

Kashwitna River bridge

Lowering minnow trap to fish
April 27, 2019

Lowering minnow trap to fish

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Minnow trap in icehole
April 27, 2019

Minnow trap in icehole

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Shublik Spring open water
April 27, 2019

Shublik Spring open water

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Canning River with bars
April 27, 2019

Canning River with bars

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River
April 27, 2019

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Hole in the ice from an auger
April 27, 2019

Hole in the ice from an auger on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

April 27, 2019

Under Ice Habitat in Canning River Delta

In the Arctic, rivers are often thought to freeze completely during winter. Since fish need liquid water to survive, there are few places where they can live. Fish usually inhabit deep river channels and areas where springwater enters a stream. However, this video shows that winter habitat occurs in places we didn't expect, below the ice in the delta of a shallow river. 

Canning River with bars view
April 26, 2019

Canning River with bars view

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Filter Total Items: 284
2014 US Topo map of the Keedysville, Maryland area.
May 22, 2014

US Topo maps now have a crisper, cleaner design - enhancing readability of maps for online and printed use. Map symbols are easier to read over the digital aerial photograph layer whether the imagery is turned on or off.

Lidar image showing the upper parts of the landslide that occurred in northwest Washington on March 22, 2014.
May 14, 2014

Want to know how elevation will benefit your state? The USGS National Geospatial Program is advancing the 3D Elevation Program, known as 3DEP, in response to the growing need for high-quality three-dimensional representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 30, 2014

The coastal geology of Simeonof Island, the southeastern-most island in the Shumagin archipelago of the Aleutian Islands, suggests the region has not experienced a great megathrust earthquake in at least the past 3,400 years.

US Topo map of the Cass, West Virginia quadrangle, March 2014.
April 24, 2014

US Topo maps now have a crisper, cleaner design - enhancing readability of maps for online and printed use. Map symbols are easier to read over the digital aerial photograph layer whether the imagery is turned on or off. Improvements to symbol definitions (color, line thickness, line symbols, area fills), layer order, and annotation fonts are additional features of this supplemental release.

USGS
March 27, 2014

Ever since the great magnitude 9.2 earthquake shook Alaska 50 years ago today, scientists have suspected that the quake's rupture halted at the southwestern tip of Kodiak Island due to a natural barrier.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 20, 2014

Why does the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Matter 50 Years Later? Scientific experts will talk about a half-century of scientific and monitoring advances triggered by the 1964 events.

Houses damaged in the 1964 earthquake
March 19, 2014

The U.S. Geological Survey has released two new videos about the Great Alaska Earthquake of March 27, 1964 to commemorate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the largest earthquake ever recorded in the United States. The videos include rare vintage film footage and photos of the earthquake damage, combined with modern interviews with some of the same scientists who first investig

Uplifted sea floor at Cape Cleare on Montague Island in Prince William Sound.
March 18, 2014

To commemorate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the largest earthquake ever recorded in the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey has reissued a series of landmark reports covering the results of investigations of the Great Alaska Earthquake of March 27, 1964.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 11, 2014

A recent U.S. Geological Survey-led study of the bar-tailed godwit, a shorebird known famously as the ultimate marathon champion of bird flight, suggests that these birds can sense broad weather patterns and optimally time their long, nonstop, transoceanic migrations to destinations thousands of miles away. 

Sea otter in kelp
February 28, 2014

Nearly 25 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill injured wildlife off the coast of Alaska, a new report issued today by the U.S. Geological Survey indicates that sea otters have returned to pre-spill numbers within the most heavily oiled areas of Prince William Sound.

1964 Great Alaska Earthquake flyer thumbnail
February 24, 2014

On March 27th, 1964, the second largest instrumentally recorded earthquake worldwide rocked southern Alaska for 4 to 5 minutes. In addition to the earthquake, the event triggered a major tsunami that caused casualties and damage from the Kodiak Islands to northern California.