Unified Interior Regions

Alaska

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Filter Total Items: 197
Tundra Swan swimming on a lake in northern Alaska
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Migration and Influenza

The movement and transmission of avian influenza viruses in wild birds may differ by the migratory nature of each host species.

Flooding encroaches on trees, Exit Creek
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Flood Frequency Studies in Alaska

 

Flood frequency statistics for streamgages and methods for estimating flood frequency statistics at ungaged sites in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada are presented in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5024. This report revised methods for obtaining basin characteristics and...

Contacts: Janet H Curran
View of Toklat River from a bridge
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Flow Duration and Low-Flow Frequency Studies in Alaska

Flow duration and low-flow frequency statistics for streamgages and methods for estimating flow-duration and low-flow frequency statistics at ungaged sites in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada are presented in U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Report 2003-4114.

Contacts: Janet H Curran
A Tufted Puffin swimming in the sea in Lower Cook Inlet, Alaska
Date Published: May 10, 2018
Status: Active

Seabirds and Forage Fish Ecology

Alaska's coastal and offshore waters provide foraging habitat for an estimated 100 million birds comprising more than 90 different species; from loons and seaducks that nest inland, to petrels and puffins that breed on islands off shore. All these birds depend on the sea to provide a wide variety of food types— from clams, crabs and urchins nearshore— to krill, forage fish, and squid offshore...

Photo of Bird Bands in a Variety of Sizes and Types
Date Published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Banding Laboratory

The Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) is an integrated scientific program established in 1920 supporting the collection, archiving, management and dissemination of information from banded and marked birds in North America.  This information is used to monitor the status and trends of resident and migratory bird populations. Because birds are good indicators of the health of the environment, the...

Mother and young caribou on Yukon-Alaska border
Date Published: April 27, 2018
Status: Active

Terrestrial Wildlife and Habitats

The USGS conducts research on trust Department of Interior migratory bird and mammal species and their habitats to inform agencies such as the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service in their natural resource management decisions.

A satellite tagged Pacific walrus on a piece of sea ice
Date Published: April 26, 2018
Status: Active

Marine Wildlife and Habitats

The USGS conducts research on marine wildlife, habitats, and processes to provide science to inform our partners as they make decisions relative to species status, resource use, and human activities.

Image shows a road split due to earthquake damage
Date Published: April 26, 2018
Status: Active

Hazards in Alaska

A major goal of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to reduce the vulnerability of the people and areas most at risk from natural hazards. Working with partners throughout all sectors of society, the USGS provides information, products, and knowledge to help build more resilient communities. This site provides important links to a number of hazard related internet sites that provide important...

Releasing ninespine stickleback into a fishless pond
Date Published: April 25, 2018
Status: Active

Arctic Lake Food Webs

From 2011 to 2013 we investigated freshwater food webs of Arctic Coastal Plain lakes in Alaska to improve our understanding how Arctic freshwater food webs may respond to landscape change the warmer, drier future.

Pacific sand lance in a sieve from a purse seine in Prince William Sound
Date Published: April 25, 2018
Status: Active

Condition of Forage Fish in Prince William Sound During the Marine Heatwave

Changes in the body condition of a key forage fish species, Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes personatus), are examined to understand how energy transfer to predators may have been disrupted during the recent marine heatwave in the North Pacific (late 2013 to mid 2016).

Benthic invertebrates captured in a bottom trawl
Date Published: April 24, 2018
Status: Active

Ecosystem Shifts in Arctic Seas

In addition to the direct effects of sea ice loss on walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus) that use ice as a platform, the decline of Arctic sea ice is predicted to promote a fundamental ecosystem shift from benthic animals that forage on the sea floor to pelagic animals that forage near the sea surface. 

A cross-section of a lake trout otolith (ear bone) under the microscope
Date Published: April 24, 2018
Status: Active

Lake Trout Biochronologies as Long-term Climate and Productivity Indicators in Alaska Lake Ecosystems

High latitude ecosystems are among the most vulnerable to long-term climate change, yet continuous, multidecadal indicators by which to gauge effects on biology are scarce, especially in freshwater environments.

Contacts: Vanessa von Biela, Ph.D., Christian E Zimmerman, Ph.D., Bryan Black, Randy J. Brown, Dan Young
Filter Total Items: 142
USGS
January 1, 2018

Corescan© Hyperspectral Core Imager Mark III (HCI-III) system data were acquired for hand samples, and subsequent billets made from the hand samples, collected during the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 2014, 2015, and 2016 field seasons in the Nabesna area of the eastern Alaska Range. This area contains exposed porphyry deposits and hand samples were collected throughout the r

USGS
January 1, 2018

Corescan© Hyperspectral Core Imager Mark III (HCI-III) system data were acquired for hand samples, and subsequent billets made from the hand samples, collected during the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 2014, 2015, and 2016 field seasons in the Nabesna area of the eastern Alaska Range. This area contains exposed porphyry deposits and hand samples were collected throughout the region in support

USGS
January 1, 2018

The Assessment Unit is the fundamental unit used in the National Assessment Project for the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources. The Assessment Unit is defined within the context of the higher-level Total Petroleum System. The Assessment Unit is shown herein as a geographic boundary interpreted, defined, and mapped by the geologist responsible for the province and incorporates

USGS
January 1, 2018

Fire can be a significant driver of permafrost change in boreal landscapes, altering the availability of soil carbon and nutrients that have important implications for future climate and ecological succession. However, not all landscapes are equally susceptible to fire-induced change. As fire frequency is expected to increase in the high latitudes, methods to understand the vulnerability an

USGS
January 1, 2018

Approximately 1,900 square kilometers of imagery were collected from July 14 to July 21, 2014 using a HyMap™ sensor (Cocks and others, 1998) mounted on a modified Piper Navajo aircraft. The survey area covered parts of the Wrangell and Nutzotin Mountains in the eastern Alaska Range near Nabesna, Alaska. The aircraft was flown at an altitude of approximately 5,050 meters (m

Bathymetric terrain model of Queen Charlotte Fault area, with multichannel sparker lines in black
December 29, 2017

Multibeam bathymetry and multichannel sparker seismic relfection data collected along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault between Icy Point and Dixon Entrance, offshore southeastern Alaska from 2016-05-17 to 2016-06-12.

Location map shows lines where seismic reflection data was collected.
October 19, 2017

High-resolution multichannel minisparker and chirp seismic-reflection data were collected in August of 2015 to explore marine geologic hazards of inland waterways of southeastern Alaska. Sub-bottom profiles were acquired in the inland waters between Glacier Bay and Juneau, including Cross Sound and Chatham Strait.

USGS
September 18, 2017

This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the exposed north coast of Alaska coastal region between the Colville River and Point Barrow for the time period 1947 to 2012. This baseline layer serves as the starting point for all transects cast by the DSAS application and can be used to establish meas

USGS
September 18, 2017

This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the exposed north coast of Alaska coastal region between Point Barrow and Icy Cape for the time period 1947 to 2012. This baseline layer serves as the starting point for all transects cast by the DSAS application and can be used to establish measurement po

USGS
September 18, 2017

This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the sheltered north coast of Alaska coastal between Point Barrow and Icy Cape for the time period 1947 to 2012. This baseline layer serves as the starting point for all transects cast by the DSAS application and can be used to establish measurement points

USGS
September 18, 2017

This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the sheltered north coast of Alaska coastal region between the Colville River and Point Barrow for the time period 1947 to 2012. This baseline layer serves as the starting point for all transects cast by the DSAS application and can be used to establish me

Map of east Beaufort Sea area, Alaska, with lines to indicate exposed open-ocean versus sheltered mainland-lagoon shoreline area
September 18, 2017

This data release is an update to the original North Coast of Alaska data and includes revised rate-of-change calculations based on two additional shoreline positions data and improved rate metrics. 

Filter Total Items: 113
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Year Published: 1967

Surface faults on Montague Island associated with the 1964 Alaska earthquake: Chapter G in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Two reverse faults on southwestern Montague Island in Prince William Sound were reactivated during the earthquake of March 27, 1964. New fault scarps, fissures, cracks, and flexures appeared in bedrock and unconsolidated surficial deposits along or near the fault traces. Average strike of the faults is between N. 37° E. and N. 47° E.; they dip...

Plafter, George
Surface faults on Montague Island associated with the 1964 Alaska earthquake: Chapter G in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1967; PP; 543-G; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Plafter, George

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Year Published: 1967

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the Eklutna Hydroelectric Project, Anchorage, Alaska, with a section on television examination of earthquake damage to underground communication and electrical systems in Anchorage: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities

The March 27, 1964, Alaska earthquake and its associated aftershocks caused damage requiring several million dollars worth of repair to the Eklwtna Hydroelectric Project, 34 miles northeast of Anchorage. Electric service from the Eklutna powerplant was interrupted during the early phase of the March 27 earthquake, built was restored (...

Logan, Malcolm H.; Burton, Lynn R.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the Eklutna Hydroelectric Project, Anchorage, Alaska, with a section on television examination of earthquake damage to underground communication and electrical systems in Anchorage: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities; 1967; PP; 545-A; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities (Professional Paper 545); Logan, Malcolm H.; with a section on Television Examination of Earthquake Damage to Underground Communication and Electrical Systems in Anchorage by Burton, Lynn R.

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Year Published: 1967

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities

This is the forth in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great...

Logan, Malcolm H.; Burton, Lynn R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Kachadoorian, Reuben; McCulloch, David S.; Bonilla, Manuel G.
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities; 1967; PP; 545; Logan, Malcolm H.; Burton, Lynn R.; Eckel, Edwin, B.; Kachadoorian, Reuben; McCulloch, David S.; Bonilla, Manuel G.

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Year Published: 1966

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

This is the fourth in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great...

Waller, Roger M.; Coble, R.W.; Post, Austin; McGarr, Arthur; Vorhis, Robert C.
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1966; PP; 544; Waller, Roger M.; Coble, R. W.; Post, Austin; McGarr, Arthur; Vorhis, Robert C.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of south-central Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

The earthquake of March 27, 1964, greatly affected the hydrology of Alaska and many other parts of the world. Its far-reaching effects were recorded as water-level fluctuations in gages operated on water wells and streams. The close-in effects were even more striking, however; sediment-laden ground water erupted at the surface, and even ice-...

Waller, Roger M.
Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of south-central Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1966; PP; 544-A; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); Waller, Roger M.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of the Anchorage area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects hydrologic regimen

The Anchorage hydrologic system was greatly affected by the seismic shock. Immediate but temporary effects included increased stream discharge, seiche action on lakes, and fluctuations in ground-water levels. Generally, ground-water levels were residually lowered after the initial period of fluctuation. This lowering is attributed either to...

Waller, Roger M.
Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of the Anchorage area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects hydrologic regimen; 1966; PP; 544-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964 :effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); Waller, Roger M.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964 in the Copper River Basin area, Alaska: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The Copper River Basin area is in south-central Alaska and covers 17,800 square miles. It includes most of the Copper River Basin and parts of the surrounding Alaska Range and the Talkeetna, Chugach, and Wrangell Mountains. On March 27, 1964, shortly after 5:36 p.m. Alaska standard time, a great earthquake having a Richter magnitude of about 8.5...

Ferrians, Oscar J.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964 in the Copper River Basin area, Alaska: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-E; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Ferrians, Oscar J., Jr.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Valdez, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

Valdez is situated on the seaward edge of a large outwash delta composed of a thick section of saturated silty sand and gravel. The earthquake of March 27, 1964, triggered a massive submarine slide, involving approximately 98 million cubic yards of material that destroyed the harbor facilities and nearshore installations. Waves generated by the...

Coulter, Henry Welty; Migliaccio, Ralph R.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Valdez, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1966; PP; 542-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Coulter, Henry Welty; Migliaccio, Ralph R.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Homer area, Alaska, with a section on beach changes on Homer Spit: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

The March 27, 1964, earthquake shook the Homer area for about 3 minutes. Land effects consisted of a 2- to 6-foot subsidence of the mainland and Homer Spit, one earthflow at the mouth of a canyon, several landslides on the Homer escarpment and along the sea bluffs, and minor fissuring of the ground, principally at the edges of bluffs and on Homer...

Waller, Roger M.; Stanley, Kirk W.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Homer area, Alaska, with a section on beach changes on Homer Spit: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1966; PP; 542-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Waller, Roger M.; Stanley, Kirk W.

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Year Published: 1966

Geologic effects of the March 1964 earthquake and associated seismic sea waves on Kodiak and nearby islands, Alaska: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Kodiak Island and the nearby islands constitute a mountainous landmass with an aggregate area of 4,900 square miles that lies at the western border of the Gulf of Alaska and from 20 to 40 miles off the Alaskan mainland. Igneous and metamorphic rocks underlie most of the area except for a narrow belt of moderately to poorly indurated rocks...

Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben
Geologic effects of the March 1964 earthquake and associated seismic sea waves on Kodiak and nearby islands, Alaska: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben

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Year Published: 1966

Geomorphic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Martin-Bering Rivers area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, caused widespread geomorphic changes in the Martin-Bering Rivers area-900 square miles of uninhabited mountains, alluvial flatlands, and marshes north of the Gulf of Alaska, and east of the Copper River. This area is at lat 60°30’ N. and long 144°22’ W., 32 miles east of Cordova, and approximately 130 miles...

Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.
Geomorphic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Martin-Bering Rivers area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.

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Year Published: 1966

Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Mesozoic and early Tertiary age form a roughly arcuate pattern in and around Prince William Sound, the epicentral region of the Alaska earthquake of 1964. These rocks include the Valdez Group, a predominantly slate and graywacke sequence of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, and the Orca Group, a younger sequence of...

Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.
Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Case, J. E.; Barnes, D. F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S. L.

Filter Total Items: 1,047
Chilkat River sonar on a bridge
May 30, 2019

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge

Kashwitna River bridge debris
May 13, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge
May 7, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge

Kashwitna River bridge

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River
April 27, 2019

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Hole in the ice from an auger
April 27, 2019

Hole in the ice from an auger on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

April 27, 2019

Under Ice Habitat in Canning River Delta

In the Arctic, rivers are often thought to freeze completely during winter. Since fish need liquid water to survive, there are few places where they can live. Fish usually inhabit deep river channels and areas where springwater enters a stream. However, this video shows that winter habitat occurs in places we didn't expect, below the ice in the delta of a shallow river. 

Lowering minnow trap to fish
April 27, 2019

Lowering minnow trap to fish

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Minnow trap in icehole
April 27, 2019

Minnow trap in icehole

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Shublik Spring open water
April 27, 2019

Shublik Spring open water

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Canning River with bars
April 27, 2019

Canning River with bars

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Canning River with bars view
April 26, 2019

Canning River with bars view

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Vanessa von Biela with cut bank at Canning River
April 25, 2019

Vanessa von Biela with cut bank at Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Filter Total Items: 257
Image: Polar Bear at Rest
April 1, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey found that polar bears, increasingly forced on shore due to sea ice loss, may be eating terrestrial foods including berries, birds and eggs, but any nutritional gains are limited to a few individuals and likely cannot compensate for lost opportunities to consume their traditional, lipid-rich prey—ice seals.

Illustration showing migratory bird paths across the Pacific
March 31, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new study published today, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service harnessed a new type of DNA technology to investigate avian influenza viruses in Alaska.

USGS
March 18, 2015

Frozen bodies of ice cover nearly 10 percent of the state of Alaska, but the influence of glaciers on the environment, tourism, fisheries, hydropower, and other important Alaska resources is rarely discussed.

USGS
February 24, 2015

Kristin Timm, a designer with the Interior Department's Alaska Climate Science Center and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, is among 10 designers who were recently recognized internationally for excellence in science communication.

Estimated potential for rare earth element (REE) deposits in watersheds across northern Alaska
February 23, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska. — New maps highlighting areas with potential for placer gold and five other critical mineral deposit types in the Bureau of Land Management’s Central Yukon Planning Area in central and northern Alaska are being released today. 

Three panel view of Alaska from NLCD
February 18, 2015

The latest edition of the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD 2011) for Alaska is now publicly available.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 20, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Melting glaciers are not just impacting sea level, they are also affecting the flow of organic carbon to the world’s oceans, according to new research that provides the first ever global-scale estimates for the storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers.

Image: Steve Hickman Earthquake Science Center Director
January 12, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey is pleased to announce the selection of Dr. Stephen Hickman to serve as the new director of the USGS Earthquake Science Center, headquartered in Menlo Park, California.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
January 6, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new polar bear study published today, scientists from around the Arctic have shown that recent generations of polar bears are moving towards areas with more persistent year-round sea ice.

USGS
December 18, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Alaska Climate Science Center is awarding more than $500,000 to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
December 15, 2014

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A polar bear capture and release-based research program had no adverse long-term effects on feeding behavior, body condition, and reproduction, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey.