Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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USGS field crew group picture
June 28, 2013

USGS Field Crew at Mattole Soil Chronosequence

USGS field crew taking a break in digging soil pits Mattole soil chronosequence.

Carbon dioxide gas detection instrument installed at Horseshoe Lake...
June 25, 2013

Carbon dioxide gas detection Horseshoe Lake, Mammoth Mountain, CA.

Carbon dioxide gas detection instrument installed at Horseshoe Lake, Mammoth Mountain, California.

June 22, 2013

Animal Interactions at Wind Energy Facilities – American Black Bear

This American black bear and cub duo was seen simply investigating a tortoise burrow, and although it is surprising to see a black bear so low in elevation, it isn't impossible. The study site, Mesa, sits at the intersection of multiple ecosystems (Sonoran Desert, Mojave Desert, montane, and coastal sage scrub). Therefore, the bears could have come down from the montane

June 22, 2013

Animal Interactions at Wind Energy Facilities – Coyotes

Coyotes were the second most frequently observed mammalian predator on the trail cameras. Coyotes are considered one of the primary predators of desert tortoises. In this instance, a coyote is passing by a burrow when it suddenly has a change in attention as it is passing by. It then approaches the burrow and sniffs all around the burrow entrance (including the apron and

View looks out across a verdant marsh with a sinuous water channel running through it, a large body of water in background.
May 27, 2013

China Camp State Park marsh

Estuarine salt marsh at China Camp State Park looking towards San Pablo Bay, northern San Francisco, California.

scrublands with hills in the background
April 25, 2013

Groundwater Monitoring Well, Anza Valley, CA

One of the wells that's part of the groundwater monitoring network in Anza Valley, CA.

USGS geologic mappers walking out an intermediate age alluvial fan surface in the Broadwell Mesa are of the northern Bristol Mts
April 11, 2013

Surficial Geologic Mapping in the northern Bristol Mountains, CA

USGS geologic mappers walkinbg out an intermediate age (likely middle Pleistocene) alluvial fan surface near Broadwell Mesa, in the northern Bristol Mountains, Kelso Dunes Wilderness Area, Mojave Desert, California. The dark outcrop in the middle ground, just ahead of the mappers, is basalt of Broadwell Mesa (~5.5 Ma), which is truncated by the Broadwell Mesa Fault. This

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Water running through a dam on a river.
March 18, 2013

San Clemente Dam in 2013

The San Clemente Dam, built in the 1920s on the Carmel River in Monterey County, California, was removed during 2014 and 2015. The dam-removal project was the largest in California to date, and one of the largest in the U.S. The USGS collected data before, during, and after the removal of the dam to study how the river channel's topographic profiles and sediment

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February 28, 2013

PubTalk 2/2013 — Is "THE IMPOSSIBLE" Possible in the Pacific Northwest

-- Coastal Community Tsunami Hazards and Risk

By Nathan Wood, Geographer

 

  • The movie "The Impossible", currently showing in theaters, portrays the destruction of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami
  • Recent tsunami disasters in the Pacific Ocean testify to their destructive power -- are similar events likely in the
February 11, 2013

2013 L8 Countdown Launch and Separation

A short video from the Landsat 8 launch in 2013.

February 11, 2013

2013 L8 Launch T minus 10

A video of the Landsat 8 launch in 2013
 

January 24, 2013

PubTalk 1/2013 — Exploring the Earth's Crust

--Seismology Uncovers Hidden Secrets Beneath our Feet

By Walter Mooney, Geophysicist

 

  • During the past century, scientists have dissected the outer layer of our planet with bold scientific investigations revealing the deep properties of the Earth's crust
  • Scientific creativity has fostered innovation in field
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USGS
December 2, 2005

From the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, recent unrest at Mount St. Helens, the environmental impacts of Hurricane Katrina, and the affects of our ever changing climate, scientists at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) will be presenting their research on these and many more topics at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting...

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 2, 2005

From the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, recent unrest at Mount St. Helens, the environmental impacts of Hurricane Katrina, and the affects of our ever changing climate, scientists at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) will be presenting their research on these and many more topics at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2005

Sixteen years ago, on October 17, 1989, the largest earthquake since 1906 shook Bay Area communities from Santa Cruz to San Francisco. The magnitude 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake, whose epicenter was 50 miles from San Francisco, nevertheless created $10 billion in damage and killed 63 people.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 12, 2005

As the nation turns its focus to restoring regions devastated by hurricanes, flooding, and earthquakes, this month’s Science Picks will highlight ongoing earth and natural science research and investigations, as well as technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), to help you tell the story.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 19, 2005

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey announced today plans to conduct a pilot project in Southern California that will improve NOAA National Weather Service forecasts of potential debris flows, also known as mud flows. The project’s goal is to provide public warnings of imminent threat in and near areas recently burned by wildfires.

USGS
September 19, 2005

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey announced today plans to conduct a pilot project in Southern California that will improve NOAA National Weather Service forecasts of potential debris flows, also known as mud flows. The project’s goal is to provide public warnings of imminent threat in and near areas recently burned by wildfires.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2005

A useful and perhaps life-saving new handbook is being released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country – Your Handbook for the Bay Region is a practical, informative guide for Bay Area residents on earthquake preparedness. 

USGS
September 16, 2005

A useful and perhaps life-saving new handbook is being released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country – Your Handbook for the Bay Region is a practical, informative guide for Bay Area residents on earthquake preparedness. 

USGS
September 15, 2005

The USGS announced today (Sept. 15, 2005) that the National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) will be located in the city of Denver. The NGTOC will consolidate the functions and operations currently performed in four USGS mapping centers (Menlo Park, Calif.; Rolla, Mo.; Denver, Colo.; and Reston, Va.) and other distributed sites to one location.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 4, 2005

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has appointed Dr. Steven Schwarzbach to serve as Center Director of the USGS Western Ecological Research Center, headquartered in Sacramento, Calif.

USGS
August 4, 2005

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has appointed Dr. Steven Schwarzbach to serve as Center Director of the USGS Western Ecological Research Center, headquartered in Sacramento, Calif.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 3, 2005

The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) reached a significant goal on Aug. 2 when scientists drilled into a seismically active section of the fault approximately two miles below the surface of the Earth.