Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Photograph of Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, CA
January 21, 2008

Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, California

Photograph of the coastal region of Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz, California

A large poster has photos, maps, and text on it to show what research was done in Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz, California.
December 31, 2007

Does Pleasure Point Need a Seawall?

The USGS, in cooperation with Santa Cruz County and the California Department of Boating and Waterways, studied the seacliffs, ocean floor, and waves of Pleasure Point, California.   We created detailed maps of the seacliffs and ocean floor using LIDAR laser scanners and sonar. We measured wave action using digital photos and videos, a wave gauge, and a current meter. We

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December 13, 2007

PubTalk 12/2007 — Exploring Antarctica's Frozen Frontier

The USGS Antarctic Program from the 1957 International
Geophysical Year to the 2007 International Polar Year

By Jerry Mullins, Coordinator, USGS Antarctic, Arctic and Canadian Programs
and John Behrendt, USGS Geophysicist Emeritus

 

 

  • Learn about USGS surveying and mapping of "The Frozen Continent"
November 15, 2007

PubTalk 11/2007 — Disasters, Dust, .... and Danger?

Using geoscience to help understand whether health risks lurk in particles produced by disasters

By Geoff Plumlee, Research Geochemist 

 

  • Valley Fever outbreak following the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake
  • World Trace Center collapse
  • Hurricane Katrina flooding
  • 1996 Marinduque,
USGS scientists navigate personal water craft around San Francisco Bay, collecting bathymetric data.
October 26, 2007

Collecting Bathymetric Data in San Francisco Bay

USGS scientists Patrick Barnard (left) and Jeff Hansen navigate personal watercraft equipped with GPS and echo sounders through the waters of San Francisco Bay. They are collecting bathymetric, or depth, information in order to create maps of the bottom of the Bay. The maps will be used to determine how the morphology or shape of the Bay floor changes through time.

October 25, 2007

PubTalk 10/2007 — Fire As An Ecosystem Process

Past, Present, And Future

By Jon E. Keeley, Research Ecologist 

 

  • Plants have evolved over hundreds of millions of years with fire.
  • Are human-induced changes threatening naturally fire-prone ecosystems?
  • How has human suppression of fire affected different ecosystems?
  • Will predicted climate
Image: 2007 Landslide in La Jolla, California
October 4, 2007

2007 Landslide in La Jolla, California

This event occurred on October 4, 2007 in La Jolla, California. A landslide, perhaps first indicated in July by cracks appearing in pavement and homes along Soledad Mountain Road, struck suddenly when a massive slab of hillside broke loose, sending tons of dirt cascading toward streets below.

Underwater photograph of jellyfish floating, they appear to be glowing.
October 1, 2007

Jellyfish offshore of central California

This photograph of the seafloor off the California coast also shows jellyfish in the water column. This photograph was collected as part of the California Seafloor and Coastal Mapping Program.

Image: Fish Swimming Underwater Offshore Northern California
September 30, 2007

Fish Swimming Underwater Offshore Northern California

A kelp greenling fish swimming above a seafloor of mixed gravel, cobble and rock outcrop with scattered shell. Fish is approx. 20 cm (8 inches) long. Image acquired 1 km (0.62 miles) offshore Half Moon Bay, California at a depth of 14 meters (46 ft). Also in the image are encrusting sponges, red algae (seaweed), and orange cup corals.

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Attribution: Ecosystems
Fish on seafloor, Offshore Northern California
September 30, 2007

Fish on seafloor, Offshore Northern California

A kelp greenling fish swimming above a seafloor of mixed gravel, cobble and rock outcrop with scattered shell. Fish is approx. 20 cm (8 inches) long. Image acquired 1 km (0.62 miles) offshore Half Moon Bay, California at a depth of 14 meters (46 ft). Also in the image are encrusting sponges, red algae (seaweed), and orange cup corals.

Image: California Coast Seafloor
September 28, 2007

California Coast Seafloor

This photograph is of the seafloor off the California coast and shows jellyfish in a water column. This photograph supports the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), which was initiated in 2007 by the California Ocean Protection Council. Data collected during this project reveal the seafloor offshore of the California coast in unprecedented detail and provide

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Image: Sea Stars Underwater Offshore Northern California
September 28, 2007

Sea Stars Underwater Offshore Northern California

Three sea stars on a rock, surrounded by a sandy seafloor littered with broken shells. Each sea star is approx. 10 - 15 cm (4-6 inches) across. Image acquired 4.5 km (3 miles) offshore Pigeon Point, southern San Mateo County, California at a depth of 52 meters.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Filter Total Items: 962
USGS
November 7, 2001

Think of southern California, and images of beach, sun and surf come to mind, coupled with boundless recreation opportunities for beach-goers. What’s missing from these images? It could be the shorebirds that cavort at the edge of the sea and sand.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 29, 2001

In observance of National Geography Awareness Week, November 11-17, the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park will host a GIS (Geographic Information System) Day event for students of local elementary and high schools.

USGS
October 29, 2001

In observance of National Geography Awareness Week, November 11-17, the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park will host a GIS (Geographic Information System) Day event for students of local elementary and high schools.

USGS
October 24, 2001

There are two weeks left for creative mappers of all ages to enter a poster in the annual poster/map contest, sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Bay Area Automated Mapping Association (BAMA).

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 8, 2001

WHAT: USGS wildfire research presentations at California’s 2001 Wildfire Conference and Public Events: Ten Years After the East Bay Hills Fire.
WHEN: Thurs., Oct. 11 
WHERE: Scottish Rite Center, 1547 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, Calif. 
WHO: Scientists of the USGS Western Ecological Research Center:

USGS
October 8, 2001

USGS wildfire research presentations at California’s 2001 Wildfire Conference and Public Events: Ten Years After the East Bay Hills Fire.

USGS
October 3, 2001

Saltcedar, an invasive shrub from Eurasia, has the notoriety of siphoning off millions of acre-feet of water from desert aquifers. Its amazing rate of spread, an estimated seven feet per hour, averaged over time, up the Little Colorado River - is difficult to imagine outside of sci-fi flicks.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 2, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Team will be on site at an open trench on the Hayward Fault, Tuesday, October 2, to explain to city and county officials and transportation managers, the importance of trenching operations to earthquake research, and the latest results of trenching the Hayward Fault. WHEN: October 2, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

USGS
October 2, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Team will be on site at an open trench on the Hayward Fault, Tuesday, October 2, to explain to city and county officials and transportation managers, the importance of trenching operations to earthquake research, and the latest results of trenching the Hayward Fault. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 7, 2001

New technologies in the form of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) have helped scientists determine that fluid-like flow occurred just below the earth’s crust in the first few months following two recent large California earthquakes.

USGS
September 7, 2001

New technologies in the form of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) have helped scientists determine that fluid-like flow occurred just below the earth’s crust in the first few months following two recent large California earthquakes.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 26, 2001

 

Imagine the world’s oceans teeming with whales, sea turtles and fishes, with shellfish so abundant they posed a hazard to navigation. Only in a Jules Verne classic fantasy? Not so. A group of scientists from several research institutions has recently depicted that such rich ocean life existed in the not-so-distant past.