Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 1,119
A green and yellow USGS extensometer installed in a shed
August 14, 2014

Pipe Borehole Dual-Stage Extensometer

Extensometers are used in land subsidence studies to measure the compaction and expansion of the aquifer system to some depth. This pipe borehole dual-stage extensometer was built in 2008 in San Lorenzo, CA and measures compaction from 10 to about 300 meters. The illustration highlights the features that can be seen in the photograph.

Steel piling mounted with solar panels, electronics enclosure, and PVC tubing standing in a body of water
August 13, 2014

Delta Flow and Water Quality Monitoring Station

Standard configuration of a Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta flow and water quality monitoring station.  The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated and maintained a monitoring network in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta since the 1970’s. The steel pilings house  acoustic doppler velocity meters (ADVM), pressure sensors and/or water quality sondes, solar panels, and

...
July 31, 2014

PubTalk 7/2014 — The Ecological Value of Coastal Fog

Cooling relief and nebulous forecasts for northern California

by Alicia Torregrosa, USGS Physical Scientist

 

  • Did you know:
  • The Moss Beach/Montara area north of Half Moon Bay is the foggiest place in the San Francisco Bay Area?
  • Summertime fog in northern California depends on ocean
Volcanic-gas "sniffer" installed at Mammoth Mountain, California me...
July 16, 2014

Volcanic-gas "sniffer" installed at Mammoth Mountain, CA measures t...

Volcanic-gas "sniffer" installed at Mammoth Mountain, California measures temperature plus carbon dioxide and other gas concentration from a steaming vent.

June 26, 2014

PubTalk 6/2014 — Into the Abyss

Living Without Light

by Nancy Prouty, Research Oceanographer 

 

  • As archives of natural and human activities, deep-sea corals are windows to the past.
  • Scientific studies of these slow-growing and long-living animals lead to good stewardship for healthy ecosystems.
  • Deep-sea coral communities are
May 29, 2014

PubTalk 5/2014 — Endangered Desert Fish to Human Hepatitis E

The diversity of USGS fisheries research has wide ranging applications

by Jill Rolland, Western Fisheries Research Center Director 

 

  • Recovering Cutthroat Trout in California
  • River restoration and fish repopulation
  • Endangered suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon
  • Using a fish virus as a model for
April 24, 2014

PubTalk 4/2014 — CATASTROPHIC Earthquakes In a Crowded World

by Thomas L. Holzer, USGS Research Geologist 

 

  • Why have there been so many catastrophic earthquakes at the beginning of the 21st century?
  • The history and future of earthquake death tolls, and the urbanization of the planet.
  • The modern megacity, and its vulnerability to natural hazards.
April 13, 2014

Channel Islands: Invasive Species

Imagine being a fragile seedling pushing through the earth and reaching for the sun — but constantly being smothered by strange grasses growing faster and taller than you are. That is the plight of the Island Phacelia (Phacelia insularis var. insularis), a tiny flower found only on Santa Rosa and San Miguel Islands, part of the remote and hauntingly gorgeous Channel

March 27, 2014

PubTalk 3/2014 — Preparing for California Climate Change

--Climatologists Look Back and Peer Forward

Dan Cayan, USGS Climate Change Researcher

  • Climatologists are using observational history, climate and earth system physics and computer modeling to develop plausible scenarios of California's changing climate.
  • How much will California's climate warm in future decades, and
Image: Tunnel of the California Tunnel Tree
March 12, 2014

Tunnel of the California Tunnel Tree

In this image, the tunnel through the California Tunnel Tree may be seen. The tunnel was cut through the giant sequoia tree in 1895 to allow coaches, and eventually cars, to drive through the tree as part of a marketing stunt. The California Tunnel Tree is the only living giant sequoia with a tunnel cut through it. 

Yosemite Valley, California is an example of a U shaped glacial valley
March 10, 2014

Yosemite Valley, California is an example of a U shaped glacial valley

Yosemite Valley California: A classic U-shaped glacial valley

Yosemite Valley from the Yosemite Falls trail. Yosemite Valley is a glacial valley in the Sierra Nevada mountains and the focal point of Yosemite National Park. The Valley is drained by the Merced River.

Glaciers have had a profound effect on the topography (lay of the land) in

...
February 24, 2014

PubTalk 2/2014 — 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake and Tsunami 50th Anniv.

By George Plafker, USGS Geologist Emeritus

 

  • March 27th, 1964, one of the most violent earthquakes of all time rocked southern Alaska.
  • More than 50,000 square miles of the state was tilted to new elevation, and the resulting property damage disrupted the state's economy.
  • Within 24 hours, a team of USGS geologists
Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Filter Total Items: 992
USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2006

Media will be given the opportunity to get "up close and personal" with the Hayward Fault on Friday, April 28, climbing down with U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists for a preview look at an excavation exposing the fault. The excavation is part of an interpretive exhibit in Fremont´s Central Park.

USGS
April 20, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is releasing two new maps providing a new look at the hazards and geologic history of the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 20, 2006

With San Francisco in ruins after the devastating earthquake of April 18, 1906, Chicago photographer George Lawrence saw an opportunity to capture the "Paris of the West" in his famous photograph "San Francisco in Ruins," taken using a 49-pound panoramic camera raised 1,000 feet above the bay by a series of Conyne kites.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 20, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is releasing two new maps providing a new look at the hazards and geologic history of the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

USGS
April 17, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will release new maps of active faults in the Bay Area and the complex geology that underlays the region during the 1906 Earthquake Centennial Conference in San Francisco. Acting USGS Director Patrick Leahy will participate in the news briefing.

USGS
April 17, 2006

Lynn Scarlett, Acting Secretary of the Department of the Interior, will join U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) leadership and scientists giving speeches, presenting new research and analyzing new products during the upcoming 100th Anniversary Earthquake Conference in San Francisco. The conference will be held at the Moscone Center North, 747 Howard Street, April 18-22.

USGS
April 12, 2006

When Dr. Philip W. Stoffer, geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Menlo Park, Calif., learned he had cancer of the lymph system in 2004, he was not sure if he was going to live. The statistics for survivors were grim. He knew he had to do whatever he could to try to survive.

USGS
April 7, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has created a virtual, interactive tour of the magnitude 7.8 April 18th 1906 earthquake in Northern California. To see the USGS tour, visit http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/nca/virtualtour/.

USGS
April 5, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will release an on-line virtual tour of the 1906 earthquake on Thursday, April 6, that will offer the public an opportunity to interactively view both historic information and up-to-the-minute science and hazard information on the most damaging earthquake in U.S. history.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 5, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will release an on-line virtual tour of the 1906 earthquake on Thursday, April 6, that will offer the public an opportunity to interactively view both historic information and up-to-the-minute science and hazard information on the most damaging earthquake in U.S. history.

USGS
March 28, 2006

Scientists unveiled today results from the most comprehensive study to date of how hard and how long the ground shook in the 1906 earthquake. As a follow up, this year's 100th Anniversary Conference scheduled for April 18-22 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco will present new, comprehensive estimates of the damage such a quake would cause today based on this study.

USGS
March 27, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with scientists from four other institutions, will release results from the most comprehensive study to date of how hard and how long the ground shook in the 1906 earthquake. Additionally, organizers of the 100th Anniversary Earthquake Conference will preview what's in store for conference participants.