Unified Interior Regions

Delaware

Located in the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula of the United States, Delaware is divided into three counties and is on a level plain, with the lowest mean elevation of any state in the nation with its highest elevation not rising fully 450 feet above sea level. An 80 foot ridge extends along the western boundary of the state separating watersheds that feed Delaware River and Bay.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 52
Date published: March 8, 2016

Hurricane Sandy

Over 160 of our scientists, technicians, and specialists responded to Hurricane Sandy by deploying field equipment and capturing information both before and after the storm. Our Sandy Science Plan identifies major research themes that will guide research to continue the support of the recovery activities.

Date published: July 1, 2013
Status: Completed

USGS Works with Partners to Study and Summarize Health of Yellow Perch

The USGS works with U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Maryland Department of Natural Resources to summarize the effects of suburban lands and contaminants on the health of yellow perch in the Chesapeake Bay.

Contacts: Vicki S Blazer
Date published: January 16, 2013
Status: Completed

EPA, USGS, with USFWS Release New Report on the Extent and Severity of Toxic Contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay and its Watershed

Report summarizing existing information on the extent and severity of the occurrence of toxic contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed.

Contacts: Scott Phillips
Date published: January 16, 2008
Status: Active

USGS summarizes information about the Chesapeake Bay and implications for ecosystem management (USGS Circular 1316)

The USGS released the Circular 1316: “Synthesis of U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem and Implications for Environmental Management”

Filter Total Items: 76
USGS science for a changing world logo
March 18, 2002

 

By using electrical measurements, USGS scientists have detected fresh groundwater in submarine environments in Mid-Atlantic coastal waters. The new data will help define sources and quantities of nutrients entering the coastal bays of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia and refine groundwater flow models.

USGS
March 18, 2002

By using electrical measurements, USGS scientists have detected fresh groundwater in submarine environments in Mid-Atlantic coastal waters. The new data will help define sources and quantities of nutrients entering the coastal bays of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia and refine groundwater flow models.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 6, 2002

The United States and the People’s Republic of China share a common problem ? elevated nitrate concentrations in water supplies used for drinking water, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). While elevated concentrations of nitrate in water have been known to cause illness in babies, there is also indirect evidence that they can cause cancer. 

USGS
November 6, 2001

What happens when a rock from space that’s more than a mile wide slams into the Earth at supersonic speed? Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners are learning as they analyze evidence they are recovering from cores drilled during the past two summers into the Chesapeake Bay impact crater and surrounding structures.

USGS
March 15, 2001

March will mark the beginning of a new field season for scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its cooperators who will begin drilling a second core hole into an impact structure created 35 million years ago when an asteroid or comet slammed into the ocean near the present-day mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

USGS
March 10, 2001

March rains helped water levels increase across Maryland and Delaware, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland. Additionally, water storage in the Baltimore reservoir system increased by 5 percent to 92 percent of capacity at the end of March.

USGS
November 7, 2000

Despite the lack of rain, many of the streamflow and ground-water levels in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were normal for October, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
October 6, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were above normal or in the upper part of the normal range for September, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
September 8, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of August in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were generally above or in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
August 7, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of July in the Maryland-Delaware-DC region were generally in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
July 7, 2000

Chesapeake Bay Inflow in June Four Times Higher Than Drought of 1999.

USGS
June 6, 2000

Below-normal precipitation in May (24% below average at BWI airport) in combination with seasonal increases in evapotranspiration resulted in lower ground-water levels and decreased streamflow in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water