Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Image: Florida Bay
December 13, 1999

Florida Bay

Looking south from the Black Betsy Keys shore, onto waters of Florida Bay. On the horizon, Key islands separate the green bay waters from the blue cloud-filled skies.

Image: Florida Bay sunset
December 11, 1999

Florida Bay sunset

The sky filled with a profusion of colors as the sun slowly set behind this mangrove island in Florida Bay, at the south end of Everglades National Park.

Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 10, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 15 of 15: Water level in sinkhole chimney stabilized since the previous day. View to south across the sinhole. In the following weeks and months, the water level in the sinkhole continued to rise, a likely result of the plugging of the conduit into the Floridan aquifer with the sinkhole debris, fill subsequently emplaced by the city, and natural consolidation

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Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 8 of 15: Community pool prior to collapse into the sinkhole. View to north across the sinkhole. (1:30 p.m)

Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 9 of 15: Community pool collapsing into sinkhole at. Pool was roughly Olympic-sized and was about half full at the time of collapse. Impressive sounds of the rebar and concrete snapping, then the rush of water. View to north across the sinkhole. (1:30 p.m)

Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 10 of 15: Sinkhole chimney after pool collapse. View to south across the sinkholne. For a time after the pool collapse and introduction of the pool water into the sinkhole, there was a noticeable increase in slope movement, especially deeper in the sinkhole. The house and building parts broke up further and disappeared. The steeper slope of the chimney or throat of

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Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 11 of 15: Intersection of South Denning Drive and West Comstock Ave. Sinkhole is edging close to Denning Drive. One block of Comstock Ave was swallowed. View to south on Denning Drive adjacent to the sinkhole.

Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 12 of 15: Water level has risen and is now apparent in sinkhole since pool collapse and house swallowed. View to south across the sinkhole. The rising water level is likely a result of the debris plugging the conduit into the Floridan aquifer. Water level is rising to assume a position more consistent with that of the surficial aquifer. (3 p.m.)

Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 13 of 15: Water level in sinkhole chimney continued to rise. View to east across the sinkhole. (6 p.m.)

Image: Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981
May 9, 1981

Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

Photo 14 of 15: Remnants of community pool in sinkhole. View to east across the sinkhole.

Filter Total Items: 233
USGS
December 6, 2004

Hydrologists, biologists, geologists and geographers from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) will discuss their science at the First National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER) Dec. 6-10 at the Wyndham Palace in Orlando, Fla.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 13, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are closely watching the long, thin barrier islands that comprise the Gulf of Mexico coast of west Florida as Hurricane Ivan approaches. These islands are particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of their low elevation. New elevation maps show just how vulnerable.

USGS
September 13, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are closely watching the long, thin barrier islands that comprise the Gulf of Mexico coast of west Florida as Hurricane Ivan approaches. These islands are particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of their low elevation. New elevation maps show just how vulnerable.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 9, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region. Although flooding in the immediate Richmond area receded quickly earlier this week, the city may receive additional heavy rainfall from Frances in coming days. 

USGS
September 3, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 2, 2004

Based on airborne laser mapping data acquired in cooperation with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have estimated the coastal-change impacts that may be caused by Hurricane Frances as it makes landfall on the U.S. south Atlantic coast over the Labor Day weekend.

USGS
September 2, 2004

Based on airborne laser mapping data acquired in cooperation with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have estimated the coastal-change impacts that may be caused by Hurricane Frances as it makes landfall on the U.S. south Atlantic coast over the Labor Day weekend.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 4, 2004

Manatee populations are growing at healthy rates in two of four regions off Florida’s coast, but may be stalled or declining in the remaining regions, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
August 4, 2004

Manatee populations are growing at healthy rates in two of four regions off Florida’s coast, but may be stalled or declining in the remaining regions, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
July 14, 2004

Did you know that from your desk you can monitor the effect of this week’s heavy rains throughout the already saturated mid-Atlantic region? The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) WaterWatch Web site can show you what’s happening to streams in your local area and show you the places most affected by heavy rains expected from these storms.