Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 326
Close-up of manatee calf underwater
February 24, 2010

Curious manatee calf approaches scientist at Crystal River, Florida

A curious manatee calf encounters a snorkeling scientist as the USGS Sirenia Project conducts fieldwork at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

Image: Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010
January 1, 2010

Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

Sinkholes damage roadways and require constant maintenance for road safety. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes, roads and sections of

...
Image: Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010
January 1, 2010

Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

Sinkholes damage roadways and require constant maintenance for road safety. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes, roads and sections of

...
Image: Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010
January 1, 2010

Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

Sinkholes damage roadways and require constant maintenance for road safety. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes, roads and sections of

...
Image: Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010
January 1, 2010

Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes, roads and sections of cultivated areas.

Image: Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010
January 1, 2010

Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

A section of a strawberry field that was destroyed by a sinkhole and filled in, as is done with many sinkholes if possible.

More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures.

...
Filter Total Items: 244
USGS
March 3, 2000

A new population of non-native Asian swamp eels, a highly adaptable predatory fish, has been found near the eastern border of Everglades National Park in the area of Homestead, Fla.

USGS
September 17, 1999

USGS scientists from the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, the National Wetlands Research Center and the Florida and Caribbean Science Center are gearing up to assess Hurricane Floyd damage to wildlife and habitat from Florida to Maine.

USGS
September 17, 1999

Wildfires have long played a key role in structuring ecosystems and plant communities in the southeastern United States. From the coastal prairie of Texas and Louisiana to the marshes and pinelands of Florida, many native species have adapted to a natural regime of frequent wildfire caused by lightning strikes.

USGS
August 27, 1999

USGS scientists, managers and experts from a diverse spectrum of scientific disciplines are on high alert Friday as Hurricane Dennis seems poised to make landfall along the southeastern coast of the United States sometime this weekend.

USGS
March 2, 1999

From the large, open-air pens where they have spent the past two weeks, eight young whooping cranes survey their surroundings. The rural, central Florida landscape of open prairie, brush, and marshlands stretches away as far as the birds can see, though only a few tens of miles separate the Kissimmee release site from the metropolitan sprawl of Orlando.

USGS
October 24, 1998

A century of alterations by humans to the Everglades ecosystem has lowered water levels and changed Everglades plant communities more than what would be expected from natural climatic changes alone over the last 2,000 years, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey. 

USGS
October 2, 1998

Heavy rainfall and flooding prompted an emergency response from USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) engineers and field technicians to keep stream gages operational during and after Hurricane Georges. Personnel from Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida are working to secure gages threatened by rising rivers and streams or damaged by the storm. Some gaging stations monitored by the USGS are used

USGS
September 28, 1998

...Initial concerns about severe flooding give way to thoughts of coasts and ecosystems.

USGS
September 24, 1998

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is once again faced with the ominous task of preparing to monitor the effects of a potentially damaging hurricane, Georges, to the southeast coast of the United States

USGS
June 25, 1998

The Asian swamp eel, a non-native fish, has been found in canals, ditches, streams and ponds near Tampa and Miami, Fla. 

USGS
June 18, 1998

Due to heavy rains pelting eastern Massachusetts in recent days, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field crews have been leaning precariously over the sides of bridges throughout the region to obtain accurate measurements of the amount (discharge) and height (stage) of water in swollen streams.

USGS
April 21, 1998

Water quality is generally good in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain but has been adversely affected by agricultural and urban land uses in some areas, according to the results of a five-year investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).