Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 184
Date published: December 2, 2016
Status: Active

USGS Everglades Research Offices - Florida

The Daniel Beard Center in Everglades National Park provides the base for most of the field work done on the control of invasive reptiles by USGS Fort Collins Science Center staff. The team works in Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and other parts of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem focusing on, among other species of concern,...

Date published: November 2, 2016
Status: Active

Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) - Southeast Region Water Quality

The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) began in 2000 with the goal of determining the status and trends of amphibian populations throughout the U.S. The program was designed to provide information useful in determining causes of declines or other changes in population distributions.  Personnel in the South Atlantic Water Science Center are...

Date published: November 1, 2016
Status: Completed

Fish Slam - Fall 2016

November 1 - 2, 2016 – Eight teams of fishery biologists from the US Geological Survey (USGS), US Fish and Wildlife Service - Peninsular Florida Fisheries Office and Welaka National Fish Hatchery (USFWS), the National Park Service (NPS), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida International University (FIU), and Zoo Miami sampled 20 sites for non-native fishes in Palm...

Date published: October 21, 2016

Demographic and Population Models to Assess Recovery and Status of the Endangered Florida Manatee

Population models developed by USGS are the primary decision-support tools used for status assessments, and rely on estimates of adult survival and reproduction rates from mark-recapture studies.

Date published: October 19, 2016
Status: Active

Modeling, Estimation, and Adaptive Management of Florida Manatees

The Challenge: Florida manatees are threatened by watercraft-related mortality, the potential loss of warmwater habitat, red tide events, and other anthropogenic factors. The USFWS and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission have regulatory authorities under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), and state statutes to recover manatees. To...

Date published: October 16, 2016

Modeling Past Variation in Florida Manatee Survival, Breeding, and Movements Rates to Establish Baselines for Aquatic Ecosystem and Restoration Research

Long-term monitoring data in the Manatee Individual Photo-identification System (MIPS), developed and coordinated by WARC-Sirenia Project in collaboration with Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory, are the basis for modeling manatee demography rates.

Date published: October 12, 2016
Status: Active

Manatee Health Assessment and Biomedical Studies

A multi-agency effort assesses the health of manatees and provides baseline information on their health, reproductive status, and nutritional condition.

Date published: October 10, 2016
Status: Active

Manatee Photo ID as a Tool for Research: The Manatee Individual Photo-Identification System (MIPS)

Since 1978, USGS scientists have photo-documented manatees in the Southeast United States. Now, more than 3,000 manatees can be found in the MIPS database.

Date published: October 5, 2016
Status: Active

Structured Decision Making for Management of Warm-Water Habitat of Manatees

Manatees are tropical to subtropical in distribution and, with few exceptions, Florida is the northern limit of their natural winter range.  The availability of warm-water habitat during winter is critical for the future persistence of the population in Florida.

Date published: August 1, 2016
Status: Active

Gulf Sturgeon Ecological Investigations

The Gulf sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi, has been listed as Threatened since 1991. Beginning in 1986, USGS has been investigating sturgeon population abundance and ecology throughout its range, but mostly in the Suwannee River.

Date published: August 1, 2016
Status: Active

Monitoring and Assessing Effects of the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP) on the Florida Manatee

Critical information predicting condition changes in manatee habitat resulting from the alteration of freshwater flows to estuaries is needed to develop the PSRP Detailed Design and PSRP Operations Plan components and complete consultation under the Endangered Species Act.

Date published: August 1, 2016
Status: Active

Seagrass Beds and Manatee Foraging Areas in the Ten Thousand Islands: Mapping and Characterizing by Incorporating Manatee GPS Tracking Data and Habitat Information

Turbid water conditions make the delineation and characterization of benthic habitats difficult by traditional in situ and remote sensing methods. Consequently, only a small fraction of this valuable resource has been mapped or characterized.

Filter Total Items: 329
Image from an application that navigates users through USGS National Oil and Gas Assessment Provinces
November 14, 2018

National Oil and Gas Assessment Provinces

This is a graphic from the USGS National Oil and Gas Assessment Explorer application, which allows user to drill into 70 oil and gas assessment provinces throughout the United States.

A broken foundation where the Cape San Blas house stood
November 4, 2018

A broken slab is all that's left of Fish Inn after Hurricane Michael

A broken concrete foundation and some shattered floor tiles were all that remained of the sea turtle researchers' field station and home base after Category Four Hurricane Michael struck Cape San Blas on Oct. 10, 2018.

October 24, 2018

Image of the Week - Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle on October 10, 2018.

Landsat 7 images captured before and after highlight the destructive path of the Category 4 storm.

Mexico Beach was all but demolished, with homes left in heaps by wind and storm surge. The green leaves that pop in the September image are stripped from trees by October, and the dull

Two oceanographers look at a coral core stored in a wooden box
October 18, 2018

Coral cores like this one reveal geologic history of Keys reefs

USGS Research Oceanographer Lauren Toth and Oceanographer Anastasios Stathakopoulos study a coral-reef core in the USGS’s Core Archive in St. Petersburg, Florida. Photo: Dominique Gallery, USGS.

A deeply eroded sand dune at Cape San Blas, Florida
October 16, 2018

Hurricane Michael cut deep into Panhandle dunes

A deeply eroded sand dune on the beach at Cape San Blas shows Hurricane Michael's impact on parts of the Florida Panhandle shoreline.

Satellite image showing how Hurricane Michael affected Florida.
October 16, 2018

Hurricane Michael Batters Florida Panhandle

Landsat 7 images captured before and after highlight the destructive path of the Category 4 storm.

A house destroyed by Hurricane Michael on Cape San Blas, Florida
October 15, 2018

Hurricane Michael destroyed many houses on Cape San Blas, Florida

A beach house in Cape San Blas, Florida destroyed by Hurricane Michael, which struck the Florida Panhandle as a Category Four storm Oct. 10, 2018.

Map showing new Gulf of Mexico storm tide bracket network
October 10, 2018

New Gulf of Mexico network speeds USGS hurricane preparations

Each one these blue dots represents a site where a storm-tide sensor bracket has been installed for the Gulf of Mexico pre-defined network. There are currently 85 brackets in Florida, 6 in Alabama, 3 in Mississippi, 18 in Louisiana and 26 in Texas, for a total of 138 bracketed sites. (Not all brackets will be used in all storms.)

 

Hurricane Michael Flood Event Viewer (map)
October 10, 2018

This Flood Event Viewer is a one-stop information source

The USGS creates a Flood Event Viewer for major flooding incidents, as a one-stop, interactive information source. On that website, viewers can click on each red dot (storm-tide sensor) to see details about it. The Flood Event Viewer for Hurricane Michael is at https://stn.wim.usgs.gov/FEV/#MichaelOct2018

One-story yellow concrete block house in Cape San Blas, Florida
October 9, 2018

Fish Inn, the scientists' field station, before Hurricane Michael

For ten years, this yellow concrete block house in Cape San Blas, Florida, dubbed Fish Inn, was the seasonal office, laboratory and living quarters for a team of USGS sea turtle researchers during their field season from November till April.

Eastern FL Panhandle map of predicted beach erosion, overwash, inundation
October 9, 2018

Strong hurricane impacts predicted for many Panhandle beaches

Coastal Change Storm Hazard Team map created Tuesday, 10/89/18 showing current forecasted beach erosion, overwash and inundation effects of Hurricane Michael's predicted landfall in the Florida Panhandle. Forecast will change with subsequent National Hurricane Center forecasts.

 

A coral worn smooth with a badly eroded base
August 28, 2018

Erosion has taken a toll on this Keys coral

A reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary with little living coral and extensive bioerosion. Photo taken under research permit number FKNMS-2016-085-A1. Credit: USGS, Ilsa Kuffner.

Filter Total Items: 246
Wading Birds in the Everglades, Florida
June 24, 2015

Wading bird numbers in the Florida Everglades are driven by water patterns that play out over multiple years according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Florida Atlantic University.

Image: White Ibis and Wood Stork Perched on a Tree Island in the Everglades
June 24, 2015

Wading bird numbers in the Florida Everglades are driven by water patterns that play out over multiple years according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Florida Atlantic University.

Image: A Manatee in Florida
May 20, 2015

The risk of extinction for the endangered Florida manatee appears to be lower, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey led study.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 28, 2015

EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Fla.— The largest and longest Burmese Python tracking study of its kind -- here or in its native range -- is providing researchers and resource managers new information that may help target control efforts of this invasive snake, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
April 21, 2015

USGS scientists have updated the hydrogeologic framework for the Floridan aquifer system that underlies Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina.

USGS
April 16, 2015

Many loggerhead sea turtles that nest in Dry Tortugas National Park head to rich feeding sites in the Bahamas after nesting, a discovery that may help those working to protect this threatened species

USGS
April 16, 2015

New genetic data suggest the red lionfish invasion in the Caribbean Basin and Western Atlantic started in multiple locations, not just one as previously believed, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
March 25, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Southeast Ecological Science Center in Gainesville and the National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette, Louisiana will merge under the same leadership effective October 1, 2015.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 20, 2015

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – – Nearly 80 percent of radio-tracked marsh rabbits that died in Everglades National Park in a recent study were eaten by Burmese pythons, according to a new publication by University of Florida and U.S. Geological Survey researchers.

Image: Kelp Greenling Among Seafloor Cover of Mixed Composition
March 18, 2015

Thousands of photos and videos of the seafloor and coastline—most areas never seen before—are now available and easily accessible online. This is critical for coastal managers to make important decisions, ranging from protecting habitats to understanding hazards and managing land use.