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Image: Hawaiian Coot (Fulica alai)
January 1, 2003

Hawaiian Coot (Fulica alai)

Hawaiian Coot swimming in a wetland marsh. Listed as an endangered species in 1970. Dark gray with a white bill and frontal shield that varies from white, pale buff, and pale blue to deep red.

Image: Waterfall, Maui, Hawaii
December 31, 2002

Waterfall, Maui, Hawaii

Waterfall, Maui, Hawaii.

December 12, 2002

PubTalk 12/2002 — Hawai`i's Volcanoes—Never a Dull Moment

20 Years of Eruption at Kilauea and Waiting for Mauna Loa

by Don Swanson,Volcanologist, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

 

  • Kilauea's Pu'u O'o-Kupaianaha eruption, which began on January 3, 1983, is already the volcano's longest rift eruption in at least 600 years
  • Lava has destroyed 8 miles of highway and 189
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A channelized flow of lava forming a tube
August 6, 1998

channelized lava flow forming tube

August 6, 1998 Two weeks later, the same channelized flow has formed a tube. A series of skylights in the roof of the tube forms a chain of orange beads on Pulama pali.

channelized lava flow
July 23, 1998

Channelized lava flow

July 23 A channelized lava flow resulting from a July 19 breakout courses down Pulama pali. By the time this picture was taken, four days after the initial breakout, the channel was partially roofed over--the first stage of tube formation

Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea Volcano, ...
March 9, 1994

Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Two bubble bursts explode simultaneously as a consequence seawater mixing with lava in a lava tube beneath surface of a lava delta. Because of the confined conditions in the lava tube, explosive pressures build up as water, heated by contact with molten lava, expands instantly to steam. The explosive energy of the steam is sufficient to blast a hole through the top of the

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Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
November 8, 1991

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Map shows the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded), and Kūpaianaha (dark shaded), and Friday's fissure eruption (light shading) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of all felt earthquakes for the past week.

Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
November 3, 1991

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded) and Kūpaianaha (shaded) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of felt earthquakes for the past week.

Image: Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea
February 16, 1991

Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea

Cinder cones at the summit of Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is a dormant shield volcano on the north end of Hawaii Island. Astronomical observatories in the foreground.

Cinder cones (otherwise known as scoria cones) are the most common type of volcano on Earth. They’re also one of the smallest. They can often be found growing on larger volcanoes, in which case they’re dubbed

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Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volc...
June 6, 1990

Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea

Lava rises around Walter's Drive Inn sign. Concrete walls of the store and roof of the post office are in the background.

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcan...
June 3, 1990

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pHOEHOE flows, Kīlauea Vo...
May 31, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by Pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Individual pāhoehoe flow fronts were typically only 10-20 cm thick as they moved through Kalapana. However, the thin leading edges of the flows quickly crusted over and stagnated. As lava continued to push beneath the crust, the cooled surface was lifted up until eventually lava again broke out of the sides and front of the inflated flows. In this way, many of the

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USGS
August 18, 1995

The rapidly changing geology in the Hawaiian Islands has profound consequences for the plants and animals in Hawai'i on several time scales.

USGS
August 11, 1995

The eruption on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone continues with little change. Lava is erupting from two vents located on the south and west flanks of the Pu'u 'O'o cone. 

USGS
August 4, 1995

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is to monitor the volcanoes of Hawaii, to study the geological processes associated with eruptive and seismic activities, and to inform the public of the results of our studies.

USGS
July 28, 1995

Soufriere Hills Volcano on the island of Montserrat in the Caribbean became active on July 18, 1995. This is the first eruption of the volcano in historic time.
 

USGS
July 21, 1995

For several weeks we have been fielding calls from anxious people in Kona asking about an imminent eruption of Hualālai Volcano.

Measuring how volcanoes move with satellites...
July 14, 1995

Last week we discussed the different land surveying techniques HVO scientists use to monitor the swelling and movement of active volcanoes.
 

USGS
July 7, 1995

The ground around an active volcano swells, deflates, or shifts as magma moves in and out of the volcano's underground plumbing system. The distribution and rate of ground deformation provides clues about processes occurring within the volcano.
 

USGS
June 30, 1995

Hawaii is a land of rugged beauty and untamed natural forces swathed in a beguiling gentleness that is unmatched anywhere else on Earth.
 

USGS
June 23, 1995

The formation of new islands invariably sparks the imagination. On June 6th a submarine eruption began at Metis Shoal in the Tonga Islands. A passing ship confirmed that an eruption was continuing on June 9th.
 

USGS
June 16, 1995

On Monday and Tuesday of this past week, large waves generated by a storm near New Zealand caused considerable damage on the west coast of Hawai'i, particularly in the town of Kailua

USGS
June 9, 1995

Hawaii is seismically very active. During a typical month, there are invariably several earthquakes that are large enough to be felt. This past month was no exception, as there were nine earthquakes having magnitude greater than 3.0.

USGS
June 2, 1995

The eruption along Kīlauea's East Rift Zone continues with little change. Lava from two vents on the south and west sides of the Pu'u 'O'o cone is transported underground through a lava tube to the ocean about six-and-a-half miles to the southeast. No lava can be seen at either of the active vents.