Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
June 13, 2008

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 5, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 2, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

A plume of volcanic gases (chiefly water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide), tiny lava and rock particles, and droplets drifts southwest in the tradewinds from Halema‘uma‘u Crater. The 500-5,000 metric tons (1.1-11 million pounds) of sulfur dioxide gas emitted each day react in the atmosphere and, with the other gases and particles, form "vog" (volcanic smog)

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U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on th...
May 23, 2008

USGS's HVO perched on the rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera, Hawai‘i

U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on the rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera, Hawai‘i

HVO and Jaggar Museum on Kīlauea Volcano's caldera rim, Hawai‘i...
May 23, 2008

HVO and Jaggar Museum on Kīlauea's caldera rim, Hawai‘i

Close view of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (right, with viewing tower) and National Park Service Jaggar Museum and overlook (left) on Kīlauea Volcano's caldera rim. At least three fault blocks can be seen below the observatory, which developed when Kīlauea's summit collapsed about 500 years ago to form the present-day caldera.

May 23, 2008

Flying high over Halema`uma`u, Waikupanaha bench

Flying at about the elevation of the plume top, this video shows a number of aspects of the ongoing activity at Halema`uma`u Crater. The mostly whitish plume rises to an elevation of about 5,500 feet and blows first to the southwest but apparently spreads to the west over the Ka`u Desert. Mauna Loa rises above the clouds in the background. In addition, the ash deposited

May 23, 2008

New gas jet at Pu`u `O`o Crater

Closeup of the new vent from a hovering helicopter showing hazy views of incandescence deep inside the vent.

Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea Volc...
May 23, 2008

Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea

This section of Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was closed in February 2008 because of the high concentration of volcanic gas blowing across the road from Halema‘uma‘u Crater by prevailing trade winds. The concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in this area is considered hazardous to human health.

Volcanic-gas plume from Halema‘uma‘u Crater drifts southwest, Kīlau...
May 21, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume from Halema‘uma‘u drifts SW, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater as seen from the Jaggar Museum (Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park) viewing area next to the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
May 16, 2008

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
May 16, 2008

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rising from summit of Kīlauea Volcano as seen fr...
May 16, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rising from Kīlauea as seen from Highway 12

Volcanic-gas plume rising from summit of Kīlauea Volcano as seen from Highway 11, Hawai‘i

Filter Total Items: 1,972
USGS
October 29, 2002

When most people think of Hawaii, they think of a tranquil tropical paradise. But savvy Hawaiians know better: an old proverb says that "when the gales blow, the sea is white-backed; when the sea rises, corals are washed ashore."

USGS
October 24, 2002

A "Volcano Watch" article several weeks ago indicated changes occurring atop Mauna Loa. Specifically, global positioning system (GPS) receivers on Mauna Loa are showing that after eight years of steady contraction, extension is again occurring across the summit. Over 2 cm of the 7 cm lost to contraction since 1993 has been regained in the last five months.

USGS
October 17, 2002

Recent visitors to the coastal eruption site, especially those unwise enough to approach the flow margins where lava is encroaching on vegetation, are being greeted by a sometimes underrated volcanic hazard-the "methane" explosion.

USGS
October 10, 2002

In the Volcano Watch article two weeks ago, we broke the news that the summit area of Mauna Loa is swelling for the first time since 1993. If this trend continues, we're on track for the next eruption.

USGS
October 3, 2002

Many streams of lava entering the ocean are shattered to bits in the surf zone. These loose fragments gradually build layers of rubble on the steep submarine slope. The resulting nearshore submarine deposits are complexly interbedded lava flows and fragments ranging in size from boulders to tiny shards of glass and minerals.

Skylight, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
September 27, 2002

Skylight, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i.

USGS
September 26, 2002

Mauna Loa has gone 18.5 years without eruption--the second longest dry spell since detailed records begin in 1843. The longest period without eruption lasted 25 years, between 1950 and 1975. Clearly the past 52 years have been much less active than the previous 107.

USGS
September 19, 2002

In early August, Pago volcano, on the central coast of New Britain Island, suddenly began exploding rocks and volcanic ash into the air. Thousands of nearby residents quickly left their homes and work to escape possible injury or death.

USGS
September 12, 2002

Recent work sheds light on Mauna Loa's magmatic plumbing. The U.S. Geological Survey has embarked on scientific investigations of the plumbing system of Mauna Loa in cooperation with researchers from University of Washington and University of North Carolina.

USGS
September 5, 2002

Luckily, Hawai`i experiences volcanic ash much less often than it does lava flows. When it comes, though, it can be anything from a nuisance to a disaster for those beneath the falling ash. The most recent ash fall, from Halemaumau in 1924, was minor but affected residents from Maku`u to Pahala. The latest major ash fall, in 1790, resulted from explosions at the summit of Kilauea.

Reginald T. Okamura commorative relief plaque and boquet of flowers
August 29, 2002

"Please do not let this rain dampen your spirits," Senator Daniel Inouye urged the gathering on a misty, breezy Volcano morning.

USGS
August 22, 2002

Big Island residents have long contended with the threat of tsunami. The central Pacific is, unfortunately, ground zero for many of the world's most destructive seismic sea waves.