Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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February 18, 2003

Lava Cascade

Base of lava cascade and construction of mound on beach below sea cliff. Turn down your sound; lots of wind noise.

February 13, 2003

Front of flow advancing

Front of flow advancing rather quickly across grassland about 70 m from Chain of Craters Road. Grass ignites a short distance ahead of the lava, owing to the intense radiant heat. Width of scene, about 4 m.

February 13, 2003

Video of lava flows

Same flow as in upper video, but a little farther upstream. Grass burns along the side of the stream. Width of view, 4-5 m.

January 17, 2003

Rushing toe of lava

Rushing toe of lava that has just broken out from front of one active lobe of flow on coastal flat seaward of Paliuli. Toe is about 50 cm wide. Note how crust is "scrunched" at bottom of minicascade, resulting in wrinkles. Other videos on this day show breakouts in same area. In all videos, wind noise may be bothersome.

January 17, 2003

Small gush of lava

Small gush is on crest of small divide and starts flowing down right side as well as left. Stream is about 1 m wide.

January 17, 2003

Lava tear

Tear begins to develop in crust on stage-left side of flow. Lava eventually pours from tear. Stream is 0.75-1 m wide.

January 17, 2003

Wrinkling of thin crust

Video shows wrinkling of thin crust at bottom of gentle slope. Note the concave-upstream shape of the wrinkles. Stream is about 1 m wide.

January 17, 2003

Lava runs from under crust along edge of inflating flow

Lava runs from under crust along edge of inflating flow. Flakes of crust, heated by the emerging lava, spall off and fall onto surface of lava. Width of view, about 75 cm.

January 17, 2003

Two streams break from under inflating flow

Two streams break from under inflating flow. Note how crust forms on closer stream and becomes wrinkled where lava runs into barrier. Each stream is about 3 m long.

January 17, 2003

Slow moving lava

Lava slowly rafts plate of crust downstream. Width of plate of crust, about 1 m.

January 14, 2003

Rapidly flowing single toe of lava

Rapidly flowing single toe of lava at front of flow 440 m seaward of Paliuli. Other videos on this day focus on similar toes. Sound was turned off during the imaging. For scale, flowing lava in all clips is 1-3 m wide.

January 14, 2003

Sheet of lava pouring from inflating flow

Sheet of lava pouring from inflating flow. Note wrinkling, moving crust.

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USGS
April 11, 2002

April is "Tsunami Awareness Month" in Hawai`i. Tsunami is the deadliest natural hazard in Hawai`i. The month of April is chosen to remind people of this hazard because on April 1, 1946, a tsunami, generated in the Aleutians by a magnitude-7.8 earthquake, swept through the islands and killed 159 residents.

volcanic explosion, Kilauea
April 4, 2002

Kīlauea has had many explosive eruptions in the past. Fortunately, we have no evidence that the volcano is building to another one. But it is prudent to examine the past to know what to expect in the future.

photo of lava
March 29, 2002

Spatter structures, and crustal overturning in Episode 55 crater

USGS
March 28, 2002

How big is an eruption? This is a short question with a long answer. Volcanologists, like other people, judge the size of something by comparing it to something else. Volcanic eruptions span such a large range in size, style, and duration that comparisons can be hard, especially between volcanoes with different eruptive styles.

photo of lava
March 28, 2002

Pu`u `O`o spatter cones, spitting hornito, and rootless shield

USGS
March 21, 2002

From time to time, we get calls from people who are writing about Kilauea, hoping to confirm the idea that Kilauea is the most active volcano on Earth. We have to tell them that, no, it's only one of the most active volcanoes.

photo of lava
March 15, 2002

Rootless shield and pond at 2180 feet

USGS
March 14, 2002

A heightened awareness of earthquakes usually follows large and destructive ones, like those occurring in Turkey and El Salvador in 1999 and 2001, respectively. Combined, these earthquakes killed more than 37,000 people.

USGS
March 7, 2002

A number of hills, elongate in an upslope-downslope (mauka-makai) direction, rise 30-425 m (100-1,400 feet) above the surrounding gentle slopes of Mauna Loa, inland from Punalu`u. Ipu`u Ridge, which forms the exceptionally steep southwestern side of Wood Valley above Pahala, is a similar elongate hill.