Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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October 3, 2003

Nearly continuous spattering from west vent of West Gap Pit

Nearly continuous spattering from west vent of West Gap Pit, and sporadic spatter bursting from tall hornito to left. Heaving pond of lava between camera and vent. Hand-held camera, so a bit shaky. Note especially the symmetrical burst from hornito at about 15 seconds. Noise is reasonable facsimile of the real thing, emphasizing the treble.

October 3, 2003

Spattering from east vent in West Gap Pit

Spattering from east vent in West Gap Pit, taken from same place as other video and also hand-held. Note the spatter rampart under construction by the falling spatter. Helicopter noise for first several seconds.

July 5, 2003

Lava pours out from under crust

Lava pours out from under crust at front of advancing breakout. See still taken at 0607:33 today.

July 5, 2003

Lava emerges from under crust

Lava emerges from under crust along side of breakout on steep slope. Listen to creaking sounds, about halfway through video, as crust flexes and breaks. See still taken at 0610:15 today.

July 5, 2003

Lava appears from under crust and drops into depression

Lava appears from under crust and drops into depression at front of advancing breakout. Width of blob of lava that appears is about 30 cm.

July 5, 2003

Lava flow

This clip lasts 30 seconds and so is a large file, but it shows such notable dynamics at flow front that it might be worth it to some of you patient ones. The active stream is 50-75 cm wide. Note, early on, how sliding crust plows into lava.

June 26, 2003

Surging cascade on steep cliff face

Surging cascade on steep cliff face. Note that surges override part of cascade next to cliff, which is slowed by friction with the cliff.

June 26, 2003

Lava issues from breached tube

Lava issues from breached tube and quickly disappears over old sea cliff. Note that center of stream stands above margins. See still taken at 0545 today.

June 26, 2003

Lava cascade

Same cascade as in first clip, but viewed more from side to see lava falling down cliff and spreading across surface of lava delta. Similar view to still image taken at 0548 today.

June 21, 2003

Lava in channeled breakout

Lava in channeled breakout from nearby tumulus flowing rapidly down steep slope before spreading out on flat ground. Same channel as shown in last two stills for today. Width of channel, about 2 m.

June 7, 2003

Gushing start of lava cascade

Gushing start of cascade shown in image taken at 0553. Lava comes from crusted flow to right. Width of flowing lava, about 1 m.

June 7, 2003

Lava flow

Downstream from first clip about 2 m. Same as shown in image taken at 0554.

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USGS
November 21, 2001

Every year about this time, the HVO staff asks the question: Will the volcano behave over the holidays? Given the amount of volcanic and seismic activity on this island, our holidays are bound to be disrupted now and then.

USGS
November 15, 2001

A "Volcano Watch" article several months ago provided an overview of the recently installed current earthquakes web pages at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Behind the scenes at HVO are people responsible for maintaining the seismic stations, performing data analysis, and producing catalogs, along with many other data products.

USGS
November 8, 2001

Everybody is familiar with ocean tides that cause the ocean level to go up and down, usually twice a day. We can go down to the beach and watch this tidal action along any coast in the world. On a global level, the ocean tides are actually waves whose crests are half a world apart and traveling from east to west. At most points on the globe, the tidal crest comes by about every 12.5 hours.

USGS
November 1, 2001

Most people know that volcanoes formed the Hawaiian island chain. Few realize, however, that the chain consists of two or more strands of volcanoes located along distinct but parallel curving pathways, variously called loci, lines, or trends. Multiple loci of volcanoes are intertwined to form one island chain.

USGS
October 25, 2001

Over the past several weeks, visitors to Kīlauea have been treated to views of spectacular surface lava flows cascading down the pali and a new ocean entry complete with a vigorously growing coastal bench.

USGS
October 18, 2001

Of the more than 30 eruptions of Mauna Loa in the last hundred years, the 1975 and 1984 eruptions are the first events for which we have detailed seismic and deformation data. Thus, we consider the 1975 and 1984 data sets important standards against which future unrest can be compared and interpreted.

USGS
October 11, 2001

Volcanologists have long known that when molten rock rises to within 2-10 km (1-6 miles) of the Earth's surface, the overlying ground is often pushed upward by at least several centimeters (inches), sometimes more than 1 m (3 feet).

USGS
October 4, 2001

"Volcano Watch" often responds to a question from an interested citizen. A resident of Makawao, Maui, asked about the stability of Kīlauea and whether its south flank could slide away during an eruption of Mauna Loa.

Close view of the lava falls in the image above shows cones of lava...
September 30, 2001

Spectacular lava drapery and falls at new Kamoamoa entry.

USGS
September 27, 2001

A few days before the long Labor Day weekend, Hawai'i County officials closed the newly opened Lava Viewing road because a surface lava flow was threatening to cross it. Fortunately, the lava flow stopped just after it crossed the road, and the road was reopened a few days later. For some, it was a revelation that this could happen so soon. Others realized it was business as usual.

USGS
September 20, 2001

Forty years ago, at 12:36 p.m. on September 21, a swarm of large, shallow earthquakes accompanied by strong harmonic tremor began to emanate from the vicinity of Napau Crater on the east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano. A rapid deflation of the summit of Kīlauea occurred in conjunction with the earthquake swarm.

USGS
September 13, 2001

The four youngest vents on West Maui erupted between 610,000 and 385,000 years ago. These newly determined radiometric ages remind us that sporadic small eruptions are possible on Hawaiian volcanoes even as they verge on extinction.