Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

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March 1, 2003

Lava flow advancing

Details of flow advance shown in 25-second clip. Lava oozes outward from base of flow, picks up loose flakes of crust (1-3 cm across) on ground surface, and lifts them up as flow thickens. This is how material once on ground surface gets onto top of flow. This is a common mode of advance of lava on nearly flat slope. Note: This is a large file because of its

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February 18, 2003

Cascade and lava falls on west edge of Kohola ocean entry

Cascade and lava falls on west edge of Kohola ocean entry, falling over sea cliff about 8 m high. Turn down your sound; lots of wind noise.

February 18, 2003

Broad cascade and falls

Part of broad cascade and falls that suddenly gushed from under crust at top of sea cliff. Turn down your sound; lots of wind noise.

February 18, 2003

Lava Cascade

Base of lava cascade and construction of mound on beach below sea cliff. Turn down your sound; lots of wind noise.

February 13, 2003

Front of flow advancing

Front of flow advancing rather quickly across grassland about 70 m from Chain of Craters Road. Grass ignites a short distance ahead of the lava, owing to the intense radiant heat. Width of scene, about 4 m.

February 13, 2003

Video of lava flows

Same flow as in upper video, but a little farther upstream. Grass burns along the side of the stream. Width of view, 4-5 m.

January 17, 2003

Rushing toe of lava

Rushing toe of lava that has just broken out from front of one active lobe of flow on coastal flat seaward of Paliuli. Toe is about 50 cm wide. Note how crust is "scrunched" at bottom of minicascade, resulting in wrinkles. Other videos on this day show breakouts in same area. In all videos, wind noise may be bothersome.

January 17, 2003

Small gush of lava

Small gush is on crest of small divide and starts flowing down right side as well as left. Stream is about 1 m wide.

January 17, 2003

Lava tear

Tear begins to develop in crust on stage-left side of flow. Lava eventually pours from tear. Stream is 0.75-1 m wide.

January 17, 2003

Wrinkling of thin crust

Video shows wrinkling of thin crust at bottom of gentle slope. Note the concave-upstream shape of the wrinkles. Stream is about 1 m wide.

January 17, 2003

Lava runs from under crust along edge of inflating flow

Lava runs from under crust along edge of inflating flow. Flakes of crust, heated by the emerging lava, spall off and fall onto surface of lava. Width of view, about 75 cm.

January 17, 2003

Two streams break from under inflating flow

Two streams break from under inflating flow. Note how crust forms on closer stream and becomes wrinkled where lava runs into barrier. Each stream is about 3 m long.

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USGS
November 14, 1997

If the flow of lava in a tube ceased, how long would it take for the tube to cool? Does the temperature in a newly emptied tube drop by an equal amount every day, or is the heat loss irregular? We have some answers from first-hand experience with the current eruption on Kīlauea's east rift zone.
 

USGS
November 7, 1997

Whether the issue is big, little, real, or imagined, we all worry. Most of us would agree, though, that it is better to worry about things we can do something about, not things out of our control. Giant submarine landslides and island-topping tsunami fall in the latter category.
 

USGS
November 3, 1997

Kilauea Volcano's east rift zone eruption continues in a regular pattern, with most lava traveling through tubes from the vent area to the coast

USGS
October 31, 1997

Dr. Mark Schaefer, Interim Director of the USGS and Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Water and Science, will meet and address USGS personnel on Tuesday, November 4 at 4:00 p.m. in the Ohia Room of KMC.

USGS
October 31, 1997

How do pahoehoe lavas flow? Over the years, many scientists have watched and measured active lava flows, and now we have a pretty good idea of the process in Hawai`i.

USGS
October 24, 1997

Recently, fall "vog season" returned to east Hawai`i, ushered in with phone calls to the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Residents from Hamakua to Volcano have called us with concerns about what has been some of the worst regional air quality of the year.
 

USGS
October 17, 1997

A volcano is a complex system. During periods of sustained eruption, such as the present time, Kīlauea Volcano undergoes little internal change.

USGS
October 10, 1997

The eruption of Kīlauea Volcano has settled into a stable vent site, extrusive rate, and route to the sea. This statement would have been unimaginable in the early days of episode 55.
 

USGS
October 2, 1997

Lava flows are the biggest volcanic hazard in east Puna. In the past two centuries, four eruptions from Kīlauea's east rift zone have produced widespread lava flows: in 1790 (more than 45 km2 [16 mi2]), 1840 (22 km2 [7.9 mi2]), 1955 (17 km2 [6.1 mi2]), and 1960 (11.5 km2 [4.1 mi2]).

USGS
September 19, 1997

The Director of the U.S. Geological Survey, Gordon Eaton, announced his retirement last week at the agency's National Center in Reston, VA. Dr. Eaton was appointed to the post by President Clinton in 1994. When he retires on October 1 of this year, Dr. Eaton will have completed over 17 years of public service under the USGS banner.