Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

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A channelized flow of lava forming a tube
August 6, 1998

channelized lava flow forming tube

August 6, 1998 Two weeks later, the same channelized flow has formed a tube. A series of skylights in the roof of the tube forms a chain of orange beads on Pulama pali.

channelized lava flow
July 23, 1998

Channelized lava flow

July 23 A channelized lava flow resulting from a July 19 breakout courses down Pulama pali. By the time this picture was taken, four days after the initial breakout, the channel was partially roofed over--the first stage of tube formation

Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea Volcano, ...
March 9, 1994

Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Two bubble bursts explode simultaneously as a consequence seawater mixing with lava in a lava tube beneath surface of a lava delta. Because of the confined conditions in the lava tube, explosive pressures build up as water, heated by contact with molten lava, expands instantly to steam. The explosive energy of the steam is sufficient to blast a hole through the top of the

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Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
November 8, 1991

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Map shows the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded), and Kūpaianaha (dark shaded), and Friday's fissure eruption (light shading) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of all felt earthquakes for the past week.

Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
November 3, 1991

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded) and Kūpaianaha (shaded) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of felt earthquakes for the past week.

Image: Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea
February 16, 1991

Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea

Cinder cones at the summit of Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is a dormant shield volcano on the north end of Hawaii Island. Astronomical observatories in the foreground.

Cinder cones (otherwise known as scoria cones) are the most common type of volcano on Earth. They’re also one of the smallest. They can often be found growing on larger volcanoes, in which case they’re dubbed

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Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volc...
June 6, 1990

Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea

Lava rises around Walter's Drive Inn sign. Concrete walls of the store and roof of the post office are in the background.

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcan...
June 3, 1990

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pHOEHOE flows, Kīlauea Vo...
May 31, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by Pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Individual pāhoehoe flow fronts were typically only 10-20 cm thick as they moved through Kalapana. However, the thin leading edges of the flows quickly crusted over and stagnated. As lava continued to push beneath the crust, the cooled surface was lifted up until eventually lava again broke out of the sides and front of the inflated flows. In this way, many of the

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Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea V...
May 16, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai...
May 2, 1990

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Harry K. Brown Park was originally called "Wai'akolea Park." It was renamed "Harry Ka'ina Brown Memorial Park" in 1953 after Brown, a county auditor, whose ancestral home was in Kalapana. Thick smoke is from burning asphalt.

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea V...
May 2, 1990

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

The left edge of the lava flow is following the inland contours of Hakuma horst, the fault block to the left, which is directing the flow into the heart of Kalapana.

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USGS
May 16, 1997

A few evenings ago the staff of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory took a field trip to Prince Kuhio Plaza to see the latest disaster film, VOLCANO! Generally, we on the Big Island take volcanic phenomena very seriously. 

Kīlauea: Eruption Status—May 9...
May 9, 1997

Many residents have noticed the bright orange glow coming from Kīlauea's eruption site on recent nights. Judging from the phone calls we receive at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, this sight strikes some viewers as lovely and others as alarming, probably depending on their past experience with lava flows.
 

USGS
May 1, 1997

The Mauna Ulu eruption on Kīlauea's east rift zone began 28 years ago this month, on May 24, 1969. For the next 2.5 years eruption was almost continuous and often spectacular. The eruption was the longest and largest on the rift zone in post-contact time until surpassed by the Pu`u `O`o eruption.

USGS
April 24, 1997

Hilo is situated on lava flows from two of the five volcanoes that form the Island of Hawai`i. However, most of the surface flows one drives by (and upon) every day are flows from Mauna Loa.

USGS
April 19, 1997

Regular readers of this column should not have been surprised last week by the news article stating that the earthquake risk on the Big Island is as high as that of California.

USGS
April 16, 1997

A magnitude-3.8 earthquake shook the Kīlauea summit region at 2:55 p.m. Wednesday afternoon.

USGS
April 10, 1997

The 55th episode of Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption has resumed with the vigor that characterized the eruption prior to January 30. We mark the episode's onset as 0700 hrs on February 24, the time when lava first reappeared in the crater of Pu`u `O`o following a 23-day pause. 

USGS
April 8, 1997

The term "geologic hazards" in Hawaii generally means volcanic eruptions and lava flows. A hazard that might not come to mind is the possibility of earthquakes, as large as magnitude-eight, under the flanks of the active volcanoes, according to Fred Klein, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif.

USGS
April 4, 1997

USGS field crews report that the lava pond inside the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater is at a depth of 190 feet below the rim, and is essentially unchanged since last Friday.

USGS
April 3, 1997

Observations of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō–Kupaianaha eruption relayed from helicopter tour pilots at 0800 hrs and 1030 hrs indicate that lava is flowing from two breakouts in the tube system near the 2300-ft. elevation, approximately 1 mile from the vent area.

USGS
April 3, 1997

I answered the phone last week to a perplexed voice asking, "The paper says Pu`u `O`o is erupting but there aren't any lava flows. How can it be erupting, then?" I explained that lava is ponded deep in the crater of Pu`u `O`o but is not overflowing the rim. 

USGS
April 1, 1997

Field observations of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō–Kupaianaha eruption today show that lava has re-entered the old tube system near Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.