Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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USGS
March 29, 2018

Preliminary Analysis of Hazards at the Kamokuna Ocean Entry

COOPERATOR REPORT TO: US COAST GUARD

Preliminary Analysis of Hazards at the Kamokuna Ocean Entry

Click on image above to view report.

Island of Hawai‘i map, showing Mauna Loa and the other four volcano...

Island of Hawai‘i map, showing Mauna Loa and the other four volcano...

Island of Hawai‘i map, showing Mauna Loa and the other four volcanoes that make up the island. Mauna Loa structural features include summit caldera, rift zones, radial vents, and historical lava flows.

Vog obscures view during slack or no tradewinds at the summit of Kī...

Vog obscures view during slack or no tradewinds at summit of Kīlauea

Vog obscures view during slack or no tradewinds at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Shaded relief map of Kīlauea Volcano's summit with caldera bounding...

Shaded relief map of Kīlauea's summit with caldera

Shaded relief map of Kīlauea Volcano's summit with caldera bounding faults delineated.

Clear day view of PW cam

[PWcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō West Flank from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

This image is from a research camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southwest. On the morning of May 24, 2016, this camera was rotated to be pointed northeast to follow a new breakout on the east flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no

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USGS
April 8, 2020

Aggregates Data by State, Type, and End Use; 1971–2016

This data set contains supplemental aggregates data for the USGS Minerals Yearbook Volume II—Area Reports: Domestic. It contains data for the years 1971 through 2016 and replaces the discrete construction aggregate tables that were included in the individual State chapters prior to 2014. It contains

Ohia seedling in an unweeded (left) and weeded (right) plot

ʻŌhiʻa seedlings were planted and monitored in plots with (left) and without (right) weeding treatments.

Solar-powered seismic station located near the summit of Mauna Loa ...

Solar-powered seismic station located near summit of Mauna Loa Volcano

Solar-powered seismic station located near the summit of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai‘i.

Clear day view of Mauna Loa during tradewind conditions from the su...

Clear day view of Mauna Loa during tradewind conditions from the su...

Clear day view of Mauna Loa during tradewind conditions from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano

Clear day view of PG cam

[PGcam] Lower East Rift Zone Camera from Lower East Rift Zone

This image is from atop Puʻu Honuaula looking southwest towards Leilani Estates. Fissure 22 is on the far left, and Puʻu Kaliu is the cone left of center on the skyline. The fissure 8 channel wraps from the center of the image to the lower right side of the image.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of

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At Kīlauea, when the lava column drops below the water table, groun...

At Kīlauea, when the lava column drops below the water table, groun...

At Kīlauea, when the lava column drops below the water table, groundwater may come into contact with with magma or hot rocks, causing violent steam explosions.

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USGS
December 9, 1999

Last week's heavy rains on the Big Island brought an end to one of the worst seasons for yellowjacket wasps around Mauna Loa in more than a decade.
 

USGS
December 2, 1999

The heavy rain that East Hawai`i experienced this week, particularly on Wednesday night and Thursday morning, suggested the topic for this week's column. Does heavy rain influence eruptions?

USGS
November 26, 1999

The Saddle Road to Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA) might seem noticeably more worn this month.

USGS
November 18, 1999

Here's a question for you trivia aficionados. Since written records began in 1823, what is the longest period of time without an eruption in Kīlauea's caldera? 

USGS
November 11, 1999

Kīlauea's south slope presents a spectacular drive by motorcar because the highway descends steeply to reach the coastal plain.

USGS
November 4, 1999

In 1916, Thomas Jaggar, renowned scientist and founder of HVO, wrote, in a foreword to "Hawaiian Legends of Volcanoes" by Westervelt, that "Everything indicates that Kīlauea is older than Mauna Loa. Mauna Loa with its flows is tending through the ages to bury up Kīlauea?." 

USGS
October 28, 1999

Many visitors come to the summit of Kīlauea, take a quick look into the caldera, say, "Hmmm, that's nice," shrug their shoulders, and move on. All they see is a hole in the ground, big to be sure, but not something that jumps out and grabs them.

USGS
October 21, 1999

For the past two months, reports of large earthquakes and the havoc they cause seem to be constantly in the news. Earthquakes in Turkey, Taiwan, Mexico, and California have made the front pages and the nightly television newscasts. Is world-wide earthquake activity increasing?
 

USGS
October 14, 1999

At the end of their shield-building stage, the summits of Hawaiian volcanoes commonly have large collapsed areas called calderas. Both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa have these summit calderas. After this stage, Hawaiian lava rapidly changes chemistry and evolves into a more pasty form.

USGS
October 7, 1999

For the past two weeks, people have been asking, "Why isn't the eruption going at full speed?," and "Why isn't lava going into the ocean?"
 

USGS
September 30, 1999

The last two editions of this column have dealt with the intrusion of magma into the upper east rift zone of Kīlauea on September 12 and with the aftereffects of that event. The story continues to unfold this week, with the resumption of lava flows from Pu`u `O`o.
 

USGS
September 23, 1999

One of the ways we monitor Kīlauea's activity is by studying the release of volcanic gases. Gases like sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide are trapped (dissolved) in magma at depth, where pressures within the Earth's crust and mantle are very great-many thousands of pounds per square inch.