Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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View of caldera from a webcam on the roof of a building

[KEcam] -Kīlauea Caldera - East Wide Angle from HVO Observation Tower

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better views through volcanic gas. At times, clouds and rain obscure visibility. The cameras are subject to sporadic breakdown, and may not be repaired immediately. Some cameras are

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View of SP cam

[SPcam] South Pit from South Rim

This image is from a research camera positioned on the south rim of Mokuʻāweoweo, Mauna Loa's summit caldera, in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The camera looks west-southwest, across South Pit, focusing on the south part of Mauna Loa's summit region and upper Southwest Rift Zone.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully

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Image: Endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bat

Endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bat

An endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, a species that is sometimes killed by wind turbines. USGS scientists from Hawaii and Colorado are devising a way to directly observe bat occurrence and behavior at wind turbines using a video system composed of high-powered illuminators and near-infrared cameras.  This new approach images the full rotor-swept areas of wind turbines for

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Side-by-side comparison of the northwest wall of Kīlauea Caldera on...

Side-by-side comparison of the NW wall of Kīlauea Caldera on a clea...

Side-by-side comparison of the northwest wall of Kīlauea Caldera on a clear day (left) and a day with thick vog (right). HVO observation tower and building can be seen near the center in each photo.

View of caldera from a thermal webcam

[F1cam] - Kīlauea Caldera Thermal from HVO Observation Tower

Live Panorama of Halemaʻumaʻu and water lake - thermal image from the west rim of the new summit collapse features [F1cam].

Disclaimer: The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better views through volcanic gas. At times,

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Coconut grove and campground on the southern shoreline of Kīlauea V...

Coconut grove and campground on the southern shoreline of Kīlauea a...

Coconut grove and campground on the southern shoreline of Kīlauea Volcano at Halapē before 1975 magnitude 7.7 earthquake. Halapē was a popular hiking destination in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Clear day view of ML cam

[MLcam] Mokuʻāweoweo Caldera from the Northwest Rim

This image is from a temporary research camera positioned on the north rim of Mokuʻāweoweo, the summit caldera of Mauna Loa volcano by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. If you look carefully around early morning or late evening, you may see a few thermal areas emitting steam. See 'Current Activity' for the latest Mauna Loa information.

Disclaimer

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Map of post-1823 lava flows erupted from Mauna Loa (gray) and numbe...

Map of post-1823 lava flows erupted from Mauna Loa (gray) and numbe...

Slope map of Mauna Loa, including lava flows erupted since 1823 (gray), showing the approximate number of hours or days it took for a flow to advance from the vent location to the ocean or maximum reach of a flow. One flow that moved down the steep slopes on west flank of Mauna Loa reached the ocean in as little as 3 hours after the vent started erupting in 1950. The bold

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Profile of Mauna Kea showing inferred contact (dot-dashed line) bet...

Profile of Mauna Kea showing inferred contact (dot-dashed line) bet...

Profile of Mauna Kea showing inferred contact (dot-dashed line) between postshield-stage Hamakua Volcanics and underlying shield-stage lavas. Approximate contact with Laupahoehoe Volcanics dashed.

View from MT cam

[MTcam] Mokuʻāweoweo Caldera Thermal from the Northwest Rim

This image is from a temporary thermal camera located on the north rim of Mauna Loa's summit caldera. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures on the caldera floor and not the whole frame, which sometimes results in the

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USGS
September 9, 1999

In our efforts to refine the geologic map of Haleakalā, we recently obtained radiocarbon ages from the youngest lava flows, those at La Perouse Bay. The ages indicate these flows were emplaced sometime between A.D. 1480 and 1600.

USGS
September 2, 1999

The Hokule`a set sail from Hilo in June on an eight-month round-trip voyage to Rapa Nui (Easter Island). The crew of this double-hulled sailing canoe is using traditional Polynesian star-compass navigation to find the island, which is about 2,200 km (1,400 mi) from the nearest inhabited land mass.

USGS
August 26, 1999

The August 17, 1999, magnitude 7.4 earthquake in Turkey leveled thousands of buildings and resulted in over 10,000 deaths. This was the largest earthquake in western Turkey in this century, but it was just the latest in a series of destructive earthquakes from the North Anatolian fault.
 

USGS
August 19, 1999

In the wild west of the 19th century, stagecoaches often had someone aboard whose job was to warn and protect the driver from marauding gangs and wild animals. This job, termed "riding shotgun," still exists but in various forms and degrees of sophistication.
 

USGS
August 12, 1999

Kīlauea Volcano has been erupting nearly continuously for the past 6,068 days since activity started on January 3, 1983. Lava first entered the ocean on November 28, 1986 and except for brief pauses in eruptive activity, has been constantly flowing into the sea.
 

USGS
August 5, 1999

How long do explosive periods last at Kīlauea? Early researchers concluded that the Keanakako`i Ash—the rocky deposits on the ground surface around Kīlauea caldera—was formed by many ex-plosions during several centuries ending in A.D. 1790, the known date of a large explosive eruption.
 

USGS
July 29, 1999

All of sudden, there's an earthquake...or was it an earthquake? Where was it? How big was it? Does it signal the start of an eruption or magma shifting its position within the volcano? Is there a possibility of a tsunami produced by this earthquake?
 

USGS
July 22, 1999

On Friday, March 27, 1868, at 5:30 a.m., several whaling ships anchored in Kawaihae Harbor noticed a dense column of fume reflected by a bright light southwest of the summit of Mauna Loa.

USGS
July 15, 1999

The islands of the Pacific are some of the most isolated in the world and have produced distinct floras and faunas. Endemism, whereby plants and animals are restricted to a single geographic area, is frequent. Hawai`i exemplifies this process.

USGS
July 9, 1999

A highly endangered native Hawaiian bird species has taken a small but significant step back from the brink of extinction. USGS biologists monitoring 14 captive-reared puaiohi released into the wild earlier this year by The Peregrine Fund say the birds are nesting and have already fledged four young.

USGS
July 8, 1999

Visitors to the Big Island's southeast coast commonly see a steam plume, the telltale sign that Kīlauea's eruption is sending lava into the ocean.

USGS
July 1, 1999

Many readers know that the island of Hawai`i is made of five volcanoes—Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, Mauna Kea, and Kohala.