Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volc...
June 6, 1990

Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea

Lava rises around Walter's Drive Inn sign. Concrete walls of the store and roof of the post office are in the background.

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcan...
June 3, 1990

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pHOEHOE flows, Kīlauea Vo...
May 31, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by Pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Individual pāhoehoe flow fronts were typically only 10-20 cm thick as they moved through Kalapana. However, the thin leading edges of the flows quickly crusted over and stagnated. As lava continued to push beneath the crust, the cooled surface was lifted up until eventually lava again broke out of the sides and front of the inflated flows. In this way, many of the

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Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea V...
May 16, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea V...
May 2, 1990

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

The left edge of the lava flow is following the inland contours of Hakuma horst, the fault block to the left, which is directing the flow into the heart of Kalapana.

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai...
May 2, 1990

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Harry K. Brown Park was originally called "Wai'akolea Park." It was renamed "Harry Ka'ina Brown Memorial Park" in 1953 after Brown, a county auditor, whose ancestral home was in Kalapana. Thick smoke is from burning asphalt.

Lava flow encroaching on the Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea ...
April 3, 1990

Lava flow encroaching on Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Aerial view of pāhoehoe flow encroaching on the Kalapana community. Hakuma horst, a raised fault block, is on the left. To the right of the point are fishponds, and to their right, Walter's Kalapana Store and Drive Inn. In the large trapezoidal plot are Mauna Kea Congregational Church and hall. The white structure across the street from the Congregational Church is St.

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Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea Volcano, H...
February 15, 1990

Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

View looking uphill at surface flows advancing down a steep slope (Pulama pali) between the east rift zone and the coastal plain of Kīlauea Volcano. Overflows from the channel on the right are building levees of pāhoehoe. Within a few days, crust accreting inward from the levees built a roof over the channel, forming a new lava tube.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube, onto a small ledge, then cascades down to the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Kilauea lava flows from a tube into the sea, November 27, 1989

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on 11/27/1989. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, eruption pisode 48, Kupapau lava flow. Hawai'i Island.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube onto rocks and into the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Lava tube sea entry on Hawai'i Island

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on Hawai'i Island. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, November 27, 1989. Episode 48 of the Kupapau Lava Flow.

A small stream of red hot lava spreads out in a smooth, ropy texture as it cools to black.
June 15, 1989

Pahoehoe from Kilauea eruption, 1989

Pahoehoe ropes form in the Wahaula Lava Flow across from Wahaula Visitor Center on Hawai'i Island during the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption on 6/15/89.

Poster laid out with photos, images, and text.
December 31, 1988

Giant Hawaiian Underwater Landslides

Large-scale poster describing USGS work.

The USGS, in cooperation with the UK Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) and others, took images of the seafloor 200 miles around the Hawaiian Islands using GLORIA. GLORIA is a long-range sonar that gives a bird’s-eye view of the seafloor.

We discovered landslide blocks up to 12 miles across, and smaller blocks

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USGS
October 1, 1998

A 1,262-m-deep (4,139-ft-deep) research hole was drilled in the southwest corner of Kīlauea's caldera in 1973. At the time, this was the deepest hole in the summit region of any active volcano on earth.

USGS
September 21, 1998

Kīlauea Volcano's summit has been slowly subsiding since 1983, the year that the ongoing Pu`u O`o-Kupaianaha eruption started. This broad and gentle cone-shaped downwarping of the summit is centered about 1,500 m (one mile) south of Halema`uma`u Crater, where the ground's surface is now 1.3 m (4.3 ft) lower than it was in 1983.
 

USGS
September 17, 1998

With this article, "Volcano Watch" broadens its scope to include items of biological interest related to Hawai`i volcanoes. Once every two months, the column will focus on topics that relate to the interplay of biological resources with volcanic activity. 

USGS
September 10, 1998

Rapid landscape changes take place during Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption. Visitors to the coastal plain six months ago could have watched lava spilling from tubes at two major ocean entries south of Royal Gardens. By July 11, the eastern entry, at Waha`ula, had ceased. 

USGS
September 3, 1998

The Chain of Craters marks the location of Kīlauea's upper east rift zone. The chain reaches southeastward from the summit caldera and then gradually bends into the overall east-northeast trend of the rift zone. 

USGS
August 27, 1998

You hear a low rumbling sound; the walls of your house shake a little; objects on the shelves skip around, maybe even fall off the shelf. Was that an earthquake?
 

USGS
August 20, 1998

Groups of students of all ages frequently visit the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory while they are on an excursion to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. When prior arrangements are made, we escort them around our facilities and give a short talk on our mission and program.
 

USGS
August 13, 1998

Geology is an inexact science, and sometimes studying volcanoes seems like a game of chance. This is particularly true for those who study the way lava flows.
 

USGS
August 6, 1998

In 1790 a group of Hawaiian warriors in the Ka`u Desert was killed by an eruption of hot gas and flying rocks that originated from Kīlauea caldera. Scientists have studied the layers of tephra visible in gullies along the southwest rift zone in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and have concluded that this event was the only major explosion of the last 2000 years.
 

USGS
July 30, 1998

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is to monitor the volcanoes of Hawai`i, to study the geological processes associated with eruptive and seismic activities, and to inform the public of the potential geologic hazards associated with volcanoes.

USGS
July 23, 1998

Although the study of volcanoes is, in itself, fascinating and is more than a full-time job, volcanologists also work closely with researchers in other sciences. One of the things we contribute to the work of other scientists is the ages of the lava flows around the island.