Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,613
Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
November 3, 1991

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded) and Kūpaianaha (shaded) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of felt earthquakes for the past week.

Image: Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea
February 16, 1991

Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea

Cinder cones at the summit of Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is a dormant shield volcano on the north end of Hawaii Island. Astronomical observatories in the foreground.

Cinder cones (otherwise known as scoria cones) are the most common type of volcano on Earth. They’re also one of the smallest. They can often be found growing on larger volcanoes, in which case they’re dubbed

...
Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volc...
June 6, 1990

Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea

Lava rises around Walter's Drive Inn sign. Concrete walls of the store and roof of the post office are in the background.

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcan...
June 3, 1990

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pHOEHOE flows, Kīlauea Vo...
May 31, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by Pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Individual pāhoehoe flow fronts were typically only 10-20 cm thick as they moved through Kalapana. However, the thin leading edges of the flows quickly crusted over and stagnated. As lava continued to push beneath the crust, the cooled surface was lifted up until eventually lava again broke out of the sides and front of the inflated flows. In this way, many of the

...
Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea V...
May 16, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai...
May 2, 1990

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Harry K. Brown Park was originally called "Wai'akolea Park." It was renamed "Harry Ka'ina Brown Memorial Park" in 1953 after Brown, a county auditor, whose ancestral home was in Kalapana. Thick smoke is from burning asphalt.

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea V...
May 2, 1990

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

The left edge of the lava flow is following the inland contours of Hakuma horst, the fault block to the left, which is directing the flow into the heart of Kalapana.

Lava flow encroaching on the Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea ...
April 3, 1990

Lava flow encroaching on Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Aerial view of pāhoehoe flow encroaching on the Kalapana community. Hakuma horst, a raised fault block, is on the left. To the right of the point are fishponds, and to their right, Walter's Kalapana Store and Drive Inn. In the large trapezoidal plot are Mauna Kea Congregational Church and hall. The white structure across the street from the Congregational Church is St.

...
Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea Volcano, H...
February 15, 1990

Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

View looking uphill at surface flows advancing down a steep slope (Pulama pali) between the east rift zone and the coastal plain of Kīlauea Volcano. Overflows from the channel on the right are building levees of pāhoehoe. Within a few days, crust accreting inward from the levees built a roof over the channel, forming a new lava tube.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube, onto a small ledge, then cascades down to the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Kilauea lava flows from a tube into the sea, November 27, 1989

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on 11/27/1989. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, eruption pisode 48, Kupapau lava flow. Hawai'i Island.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube onto rocks and into the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Lava tube sea entry on Hawai'i Island

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on Hawai'i Island. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, November 27, 1989. Episode 48 of the Kupapau Lava Flow.

Filter Total Items: 1,825
USGS
April 9, 1998

In some regards, monitoring an active volcano is easy; the constant bustle keeps a watcher on his or her toes. But what if a volcano hasn't erupted in 200 years?
 

USGS
April 2, 1998

As we all know, there are no facts about the future. We cannot know for sure what will happen tomorrow, much less next year or 1,000 years from now. How, then, can we be so bold as to guess where the next volcano will form in Hawai`i, perhaps 100,000 years or more down the road?
 

USGS
March 26, 1998

While watching the Olympics a few weeks ago, I started wondering how our lava flows would place in typical competitions. Of course, it wouldn't be quite as simple as setting up a course, getting an eruption to happen at a convenient time at the starting point, and accurately timing the result.

USGS
March 20, 1998

Sharing the results of scientific investigations on Hawai`i's volcanoes has always been a primary goal of scientists working at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. In 1912, Thomas A. Jaggar, Director of HVO, published the first series of informal newsletters about the activity of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa.

USGS
March 16, 1998

East Rift Zone Eruption Quietly Delivers Lava to the Sea

USGS
March 12, 1998

Two geologists who used to work at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory were back in the state last week viewing Hawai`i's volcanoes from a different perspective. Cruising among the islands aboard a 270-ft ship, Jennifer Reynolds and Dave Clague (HVO's former scientist-in-charge) thoroughly enjoyed the smooth water and sunny weather.

USGS
March 5, 1998

In recent months we have discussed hazards from lava flows in the Hilo and Puna areas. Today we focus on the Ka`u District.
 

USGS
February 26, 1998

Someone once said, "Climate is what you expect, weather is what you get." The weather of the last week or so has brought a sigh of relief to many east Hawaii residents. The return of the trades has brought much needed moisture, creating the joyful sound of water trickling into depleted water tanks and easing fire danger that had reached critical levels.
 

USGS
February 24, 1998

Bench collapse, temporary draining of lava tube are prominent events of the past three weeks

USGS
February 19, 1998

A gentle, effusive style of activity has characterized the ongoing eruption of Kīlauea for well over a decade now. But remember the explosive episodes of 1983, `84, `85 and the first half of `86? Pu`u `O`o burst forth periodically with towering lava fountains that could be seen for miles around. Ever wonder why the change? Just what causes a volcano to flow rather than blow?
 

USGS
February 12, 1998

Japan—only 63 million years away! Advertising like that would put a shipping company out of business, but the Plate Tectonic Express has no competitors when it comes to moving continents and oceanic plates around the globe.
 

USGS
February 5, 1998

Scientific concepts are often thought to result from thinking about hard facts. Speculation is sometimes considered out of bounds for scientists.