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Submerged coconut grove at Halapē after 1975 earthquake, Kīlauea Vo...
December 4, 1975

Submerged coconut grove at Halapē after 1975 quake, Kīlauea

A M 7.7 earthquake on November 29, 1975, was located beneath the south flank of Kīlauea. Along the south coast of Kīlauea at Halapē, 30 km southwest of the earthquake, the ground subsided by as much as 3.5 m (11.5 ft), which left a grove of coconut palms standing in water about 1.2 m (4 ft) deep and the new shoreline about 100 to 150 m (110 to 164 yd) inland from its

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Earthquake-damaged road, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Kīlauea V...
November 29, 1975

Earthquake-damaged road, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Kīlauea

Ground cracks along Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park caused by the M 7.7 earthquake on November 25, 1975. The cracks resulted from slumping of the ground toward the rim of Kīlauea Crater, the edge of which is left of the guardrails.

Mauna Loa 1975 eruption. Lava fountains up to 20 m (65 ft) high eru...
July 6, 1975

Mauna Loa 1975 eruption. Lava fountains up to 20 m (65 ft) high eru...

Mauna Loa 1975 eruption. Lava fountains up to 20 m (65 ft) high erupted from fissures on the north flank of the volcano early Sunday morning, July 6, 1975.

South flank of Kīlauea Volcano consists of several large scarps for...
June 24, 1971

South flank of Kīlauea consists of several large scarps formed by r...

Seaward sliding of Kīlauea's south flank over many thousands of years has resulted in large ground displacements along shallow faults that break the surface, as shown by the cliffs ("pali" in Hawaiian) seen here. Most of the movement along the faults occur during sudden slip that cause large earthquakes. Scientists recently discovered that the south flank also moves

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Kilauea Volcano -- Lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
December 31, 1969

Kilauea Volcano -- Lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 15, 2018. Given the dynamic nature of Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone eruption, with changing vent locations, 

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lava fountain
September 6, 1969

lava fountain

This lava fountain, which erupted on September 6, 1969, during the Mauna Ulu eruption, was about 540 m (1770 ft) tall. The tephra cone, eventually named Mauna Ulu, can be seen in the fallout area (right of the fountains. in middle of image). It is now a 121 m (397 ft) tall lava shield in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. In the foreground, lava cascades into ‘Ālo‘i crater,

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Two people sit on the remains of a building looking at debris on a street with bent-over parking meter in foreground.
December 31, 1960

Aftermath of Chilean tsunami in Hilo, Hawaii

Aftermath of the 1960 Chilean tsunami in Hilo, Hawaii, where the tsunami caused 61 deaths.

Displacement of Kapoho fault scarp, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, cause...
January 13, 1960

Displacement of Kapoho fault scarp, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i, caused by mag...

View westward along the Kapoho fault scarp in the village of Kapoho following a swarm of earthquakes in the area. The ground cracking was caused by subsidence of a graben (down-dropped block) that spanned the community. The subsidence accompanied the rise of magma along this part of the East Rift Zone, which erupted a few hours later less than about 600 m (1,970 ft) from

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Lava fountain in early morning, Kīlauea Iki, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai...
December 19, 1959

Lava fountain in early morning, Kīlauea Iki, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Great quantities of lava pour from the base of a 480-m-tall (1,575 ft) fountain about 65 minutes after the start of episode 16. Lava discharge at this time was about 1.3 million cubic meters per hour (1.7 million cubic yards), which sent lava over the entire lake by 4:05 a.m. The lava fountain illuminates the top of Pu‘u Pua‘i cone, which is about half as high as the

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Ka‘apuna lava flow, Mauna Loa 1950, creates steam plume as it enter...
June 2, 1950

Ka‘apuna lava flow, Mauna Loa 1950, creates steam plume as it enter...

The Ka‘apuna flow traveled from the Southwest Rift Zone vent (7,800 ft elevation) to the coast in just 17 hours.

Fissure of lava fountains erupting from Mauna Loa's upper southwest...
June 2, 1950

Fissure of lava fountains erupting from Mauna Loa's upper SW rift z...

Fissure of lava fountains erupting from Mauna Loa's upper southwest rift zone, June 2, 1950. Plumes of volcanic gas rise high into the air. Aerial photograph taken by the Air National Guard.

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USGS
October 17, 1997

A volcano is a complex system. During periods of sustained eruption, such as the present time, Kīlauea Volcano undergoes little internal change.

USGS
October 10, 1997

The eruption of Kīlauea Volcano has settled into a stable vent site, extrusive rate, and route to the sea. This statement would have been unimaginable in the early days of episode 55.
 

USGS
October 2, 1997

Lava flows are the biggest volcanic hazard in east Puna. In the past two centuries, four eruptions from Kīlauea's east rift zone have produced widespread lava flows: in 1790 (more than 45 km2 [16 mi2]), 1840 (22 km2 [7.9 mi2]), 1955 (17 km2 [6.1 mi2]), and 1960 (11.5 km2 [4.1 mi2]).

USGS
September 19, 1997

The Director of the U.S. Geological Survey, Gordon Eaton, announced his retirement last week at the agency's National Center in Reston, VA. Dr. Eaton was appointed to the post by President Clinton in 1994. When he retires on October 1 of this year, Dr. Eaton will have completed over 17 years of public service under the USGS banner.
 

Lava entering sea...
September 12, 1997

The billowing steam plumes rising from where lava enters the ocean are an indication that Kīlauea's eruption may be returning to normal, after several months of unsettled behavior. 

USGS
September 5, 1997

"A curtain of fire extended far down the rift zone. Fire fountains played to great heights. Burning embers fell to the ground. Smoke drifted downwind from the fountains of fire. Rivers of fire flowed downslope."
 

USGS
August 29, 1997

For over a decade, we have watched lava flows from Kīlauea overrun nearly 40 square miles of land, destroying precious forests, communities, and sacred ground. At other times, major earthquakes have generated damage over considerable parts of the island of Hawaii and, in the cases of the 1871 and 1938 earthquakes, even other islands.

USGS
August 22, 1997

Rift zones, which form during the shield-building stage of development, are prominent features of Hawaiian volcanoes. They are typically long, linear features whose formation and orientation are influenced by gravity and the pressures imparted by adjacent volcanoes. Most Hawaiian volcanoes have at least two major rift zones. These rift zones extend all the way down to the ocean floor.