Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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August 27, 2008

Fifth explosive eruption

Movie shows a small explosive eruption, at 7:37 am, from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The normal white degassing plume is rapidly overwhelmed by a more robust, ash-rich plume that rises rapidly from the vent. This is the fifth explosive eruption since the new vent at Halema`uma`u appeared in mid-March.

August 20, 2008

Awesome movie! Ash-rich phase

Movie shows an example of an ash-rich phase at Halema`uma`u crater. This event occurred at 3:40pm. These sporadic ash-rich phases are probably due to small rockfalls within the vent.

Image: Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i
July 16, 2008

Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

When lava from the Pu'u 'Ō'ō-Kupaianaha eruption, active since 1983, meets the ocean, large littoral explosions can result.

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
July 16, 2008

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Incandescent arcs trace the path of lava fragments cast out during a tephra-jet explosion at the Waikupanaha ocean entry in 2008. This is a relatively small explosion, reaching a few tens of meters (yards) height, while one earlier in the day was nearly 70 meters (230 ft) in height. At the bottom of the photograph is the rim of the littoral cone built up by explosion

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July 10, 2008

Low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3

Movie showing the low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3; video of spattering from the vent on the west side of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera; and video of the vent on the east wall of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera.

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
June 13, 2008

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 5, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 2, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

A plume of volcanic gases (chiefly water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide), tiny lava and rock particles, and droplets drifts southwest in the tradewinds from Halema‘uma‘u Crater. The 500-5,000 metric tons (1.1-11 million pounds) of sulfur dioxide gas emitted each day react in the atmosphere and, with the other gases and particles, form "vog" (volcanic smog)

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Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea Volc...
May 23, 2008

Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea

This section of Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was closed in February 2008 because of the high concentration of volcanic gas blowing across the road from Halema‘uma‘u Crater by prevailing trade winds. The concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in this area is considered hazardous to human health.

May 23, 2008

Flying high over Halema`uma`u, Waikupanaha bench

Flying at about the elevation of the plume top, this video shows a number of aspects of the ongoing activity at Halema`uma`u Crater. The mostly whitish plume rises to an elevation of about 5,500 feet and blows first to the southwest but apparently spreads to the west over the Ka`u Desert. Mauna Loa rises above the clouds in the background. In addition, the ash deposited

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photo of lava
April 15, 2003

Pleasant Sunday morning between rain showers

photo of lava
April 12, 2003

Inflated lava and the ahu: what a difference a day makes

Maui Nui submergence history, showing extent of Maui Nui landmass at different times
April 10, 2003

The four islands of Maui, Moloka`i, Lana`i, and Kaho`olawe were once all connected as a vast landmass known as Maui Nui, literally "big Maui." This concept was first proposed 60 years ago by geologist Harold Stearns, who recognized the geologic evidence for repeated episodes of island submergence and reemergence.

Map showing Koa`e fault system
April 3, 2003

Kilauea has one of the most active fault systems in the world. The Koa`e fault system is 2-3 km (1.2-1.8 miles) wide and extends about 17 km (10 miles) between the east and southwest rift zones, south of Kilauea's caldera.