Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,576
August 10, 2002

Lava falling over sea cliff

Lava falling over sea cliff into water at western group of entries.

August 10, 2002

Close-up of lava falls and steam cloud

Close-up of lava falls and steam cloud generated by lava entering water.

August 9, 2002

Lava falls into sea from western two entries at Highcastle

Lava falls into sea from western two entries at Highcastle. Entry started within past several hours. Listen to the "plop, plop" sounds as lava drips hit water.

August 9, 2002

Lava dropping into the sea

Telephoto of lava dropping into the sea.

July 21, 2002

Lava spills over Wilipe`a sea cliff

Lava spills over Wilipe`a sea cliff and across boulders into the sea.

July 21, 2002

Lava spilling over the lip of Wilipe`a sea cliff

Close view of lava spilling over the lip of Wilipe`a sea cliff.

July 21, 2002

Wave crashing over lava

Close view of wave crashing over lava in the surf zone.

July 19, 2002

Lava cascades down sea cliff

Lava cascades down sea cliff on July 19, 2002, 3.5 hours after Mother's Day flow reached to the sea.

February 23, 2002

A`a lava flow on 23 February

 

A`a lava flow on 23 February

    Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea Volcano, ...
    March 9, 1994

    Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

    Two bubble bursts explode simultaneously as a consequence seawater mixing with lava in a lava tube beneath surface of a lava delta. Because of the confined conditions in the lava tube, explosive pressures build up as water, heated by contact with molten lava, expands instantly to steam. The explosive energy of the steam is sufficient to blast a hole through the top of the

    ...
    Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
    November 8, 1991

    Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

    Map shows the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded), and Kūpaianaha (dark shaded), and Friday's fissure eruption (light shading) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of all felt earthquakes for the past week.

    Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
    November 3, 1991

    Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

    Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded) and Kūpaianaha (shaded) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of felt earthquakes for the past week.

    Filter Total Items: 1,987
    photo of lava
    January 25, 2002

    Rootless shields and hornitos along the main tube system

    USGS
    January 24, 2002

    In one of the most ambitious volcano-monitoring efforts ever undertaken, scientists of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) are moving ahead with plans to increase the number of volcanoes they monitor with real-time geophysical instruments.

    Map showing the lava flow from the 1859 Mauna Loa eruption
    January 17, 2002

    The 1859 eruption of Mauna Loa began in the evening of January 23. Following a brief summit eruption, an outbreak occurred high on Mauna Loa's northwest flank at the 3380 m (11,090 ft) elevation. The eruption ultimately destroyed a coastal village and fishponds at Wainanali`i and Kiholo, on the west coast of the island.

    photo of lava
    January 17, 2002

    Views of 2220' rootless shield and 2300' growing hornito

    photo of lava
    January 11, 2002

    A week's growth at the Kamoamoa bench and at a hornito

    USGS
    January 10, 2002

    At this new calendar year, we welcome to our staff at the U S Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory our newest volcano watcher, Dr. Peter Cervelli.

    photo of lava
    January 6, 2002

    Growth of west side of Kamoamoa bench

    photo of lava
    January 4, 2002

    Views of south side of Pu`u `O`o, including Puka Nui

    USGS
    January 3, 2002

    It is hard to believe that the Pu`u `O`o eruption became 19 years old on January 3. 

    USGS
    December 27, 2001

    Haleakalā volcano, on Maui, is still in its postshield stage of volcanic evolution, as determined by 50 new isotopic ages. The volcano was long thought to have passed beyond that stage, with a lengthy eruptive lull lasting several hundred thousand years. The new ages show, however, that the lull does not exist and that lavaflows have erupted persistently during the past one million years.

    USGS
    December 20, 2001

    "When you can't breathe, nothing else matters." The motto of the American Lung Association resonates for many of us who live on the island of Hawai'i, especially those located directly downwind of Kīlauea's eruptive vents.