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Lava flow encroaching on the Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea ...
April 3, 1990

Lava flow encroaching on Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Aerial view of pāhoehoe flow encroaching on the Kalapana community. Hakuma horst, a raised fault block, is on the left. To the right of the point are fishponds, and to their right, Walter's Kalapana Store and Drive Inn. In the large trapezoidal plot are Mauna Kea Congregational Church and hall. The white structure across the street from the Congregational Church is St.

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Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea Volcano, H...
February 15, 1990

Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

View looking uphill at surface flows advancing down a steep slope (Pulama pali) between the east rift zone and the coastal plain of Kīlauea Volcano. Overflows from the channel on the right are building levees of pāhoehoe. Within a few days, crust accreting inward from the levees built a roof over the channel, forming a new lava tube.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube, onto a small ledge, then cascades down to the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Kilauea lava flows from a tube into the sea, November 27, 1989

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on 11/27/1989. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, eruption pisode 48, Kupapau lava flow. Hawai'i Island.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube onto rocks and into the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Lava tube sea entry on Hawai'i Island

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on Hawai'i Island. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, November 27, 1989. Episode 48 of the Kupapau Lava Flow.

A small stream of red hot lava spreads out in a smooth, ropy texture as it cools to black.
June 15, 1989

Pahoehoe from Kilauea eruption, 1989

Pahoehoe ropes form in the Wahaula Lava Flow across from Wahaula Visitor Center on Hawai'i Island during the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption on 6/15/89.

Lava bubble burst explosion, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
October 5, 1988

Lava bubble burst explosion, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

A thin-walled lava bubble expands and bursts. These "bubble bursts" occur when seawater infiltrates the lava tube system near the shore. Such bubble bursts produce translucent sheets of spatter, or limu o Pele.

Upper south flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i. Prominent cinder cone (low...
July 11, 1988

Upper south flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i. Prominent cinder cone (low...

Pu‘u Keonehehe‘e and the two small cones immediately to the northwest (left) are among the youngest cones erupted on the volcano, as recent as about 4,000 years ago. The other cones in this view are part of the Laupahoehoe Volcanics, but much older, dating to 70,000 years ago. The light colored surface between the cones consists of glacial deposits with ages between 40,000

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Northeast flank Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i from about 5,200 ft to summit. P...
July 11, 1988

Northeast flank Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i from about 5,200 ft to summit. P...

The light colored lava flows in foreground are part of the older Laupahoehoe Volcanics, erupted between 70,000 to 13,000 years ago. one of the youngest cinder cones erupted by the volcano,

Glacial end moraine deposits on south flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i...
July 11, 1988

Glacial end moraine deposits on south flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i

Glacial end moraine deposits on south flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i

Pu‘umaKAHAKOkanaka, northeast flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i...
July 11, 1988

Pu‘umaKAHAKOkanaka, NE flank of Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i

12,398 ft elev according to USGS Geographic Names Information System

Tephra jet explosion, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
February 3, 1988

Tephra jet explosion, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Explosive interaction between lava and seawater blasts a tephra jet consisting of steam, hot water, black tephra, and molten fragments into the air. This explosion is directed primarily toward the sea, but many explosions also send a shower of lava more than 10 to 20 m inland. Tehpra jets are the most common type of lava-seawater explosion, and typically occur when an open

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Glowing lava flowing down a stream channel with tall rock banks.People watch from the bank tops.
March 31, 1987

Lava flow enters Queens Bath, Kilauea Volcano, 1987

Bystanders watch steam rising from Queens Bath as lava flow enters the water. Lava overran Highway 130 at 0748 Hawaii Standard Time on the same morning at the western margin of the Kapa'ahu flow. By the end of the day, Punalu'u heiau was overrun, and Queens Bath was filled with lava.

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USGS
March 31, 1997

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, at Kīlauea Volcano, has been erupting almost continuously since January 3, 1983. However, this is the first time since January 31 of this year that lava has been observed anywhere except within the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.

USGS
March 31, 1997

Lava is no longer confined to a pond in the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. Starting at least as early as March 29, lavareappeared in a pit (Episode 51 vent area) on the southwest flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.

USGS
March 27, 1997

What will the next eruption of Hualālai be like? The first step in answering that question is to find out what the last several eruptions were like. That doesn't sound so hard - we should be able to look in some book or on the Worldwide Web. After all, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa erupted a bunch of times in the last couple of centuries and there is plenty of information on those eruptions available.

USGS
March 20, 1997

Dr. Thomas L . Wright, HVO's Scientist-in-Charge from 1984 to 1991, returned to the Big Island for a short visit last week to conduct studies of the fault systems cutting Kīlauea's south flank. As a scientist, Wright is best known for his pivotal research on the geochemistry of Hawaiian lava.
 

USGS
March 20, 1997

Dr. Thomas L . Wright, HVO's Scientist-in-Charge from 1984 to 1991, returned to the Big Island for a short visit last week to conduct studies of the fault systems cutting Kīlauea's south flank. As a scientist, Wright is best known for his pivotal research on the geochemistry of Hawaiian lava.
 

USGS
March 13, 1997

If you've ever watched videos of the current eruption, you've seen geologists throwing hammer-headed cables into the lava tube to snag a glob of lava, or running to catch molten spatter from lava fountains. Lava sampling can be risky, so why do we bother to do it?

USGS
March 6, 1997

Sinners or not, many of us living on the island of Hawai`i over the past decade feel that, although we cherish the volcanoes, the smell of sulfur gas and volcanic air pollution, or vog, from Kīlauea has become decidedly unpleasant.
 

USGS
February 28, 1997

The Island of Hawai`i is the fastest-growing region in the State of Hawai`i, with over 100,000 residents and a population that continues to grow at a rate of 3% per annum. The Governor has referred to the Big Island as the crown jewel of the State. 

USGS
February 24, 1997

On Monday morning at 7:40 a.m., February 24, a Blue Hawaiian Helicopter tour pilot reported sighting an active lava lake within Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater. 

USGS
February 20, 1997

Kīlauea Volcano continues to be in a state of repose with no eruptive activity since January 31. Although no molten rock can be seen on the surface of the volcano, seismic and geodetic monitors indicate that magma is moving within.
 

USGS
February 17, 1997

Pu`u `O`o was alive and well on Wednesday, January 29, with acrid fumes drifting across the landscape and an active pond glowing red at night. The next morning, it seemed to be a dead, gutted hulk. So goes the cinder-and-spatter cone whose name has become synonymous with 14 years of eruption at Kīlauea Volcano. What happened?
 

USGS
February 6, 1997

Most visitors to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park have driven down the Chain of Craters Road to the coast and observed the high south-facing pali that form the Hilina fault system of Kīlauea Volcano.