Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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October 12, 2008

Explosive eruption from Halema`uma`u

movie (x3 speed) shows the latest explosive eruption from the vent in Halema`uma`u, which occurred at 7:28am. A robust, ash-rich mushroom cloud is ejected, and followed by pulses of hot, glowing gas and particles. The explosion deposited a field of fist-size ejecta around the crater rim.

October 12, 2008

Explosive eruption from Halema`uma`u rim

movie of the October 12 explosive eruption captured by a camera located on the rim of Halema`uma`u just above the vent. The camera was completely engulfed in the ash cloud, turning day to night, then bombarded by falling ejecta.

October 11, 2008

Halema`uma`u ash-rich pulse

movie (x3 speed) shows an ash event from the vent in Halema`uma`u, occurring at 3:54 pm. The normally white degassing plume is rapidly overwhelmed with a vigorous ash-rich pulse that rises rapidly from the vent. Red flashes above the vent indicate hot, incandescent material being ejected.

September 5, 2008

Vigorously bubbling lava surface beneath Halema`uma`u vent

Movie shows a roiling, bubbling lava surface approximately 100 yards beneath the rim of the vent within Halema`uma`u. This is the first clear view of lava within the vent, which opened on March 19, 2008. The video was taken from a helicopter hovering over the Halema`uma`u overlook area. The overhanging rim at the right side of the frame is the floor of Halema`uma`u crater

Image: The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption
September 3, 2008

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i—the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit cal...
September 3, 2008

HVO on rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera overlooking Halema‘uma‘u, Ha...

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the first volcano observatory in the United States, is located on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. A volcanic gas plume rises from a vent that opened in 2008 at the base of the south wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Crater Rim Drive in foreground.

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii...
September 3, 2008

USGS HVO, Kīlauea, Hawaii

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera, overlooks Halema‘uma‘u Crater, where a new vent that opened in March 2008 emits a volcanic gas plume.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit cal...
September 3, 2008

HVO on rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera overlooking Halema‘uma‘u, Ha...

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the first volcano observatory in the United States, is located on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. A volcanic gas plume rises from a vent that opened in 2008 at the base of the south wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Crater Rim Drive in foreground. The observatory is

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Image: USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
September 3, 2008

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is perched on the rim of Kilauea Volcano's summit caldera (next to the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park), providing a spectacular view of the active vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Image: The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption
September 3, 2008

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i—the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008.

September 2, 2008

Nightshot movie showing the explosive eruption

Movie, in 'nightshot' mode and zoomed in on the Halema`uma`u vent, shows the explosive eruption which occurred at 8:13 pm. This eruption carpeted the area around the Halema`uma`u crater rim with ejecta as large as 8 inches long.

August 31, 2008

Pulse of ash and flashes of incandescence

Video shows an ash-emission event at 6:53pm on August 31 from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The event begins with a robust pulse of ash, followed shortly by flashes of bright incandescence that rise about 50 yards above the vent.

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USGS
February 14, 2002

As many of you die-hard eruption fans already know, lava is no longer entering the ocean, for the first time since last May. The tube leading to the East Kupapa`u entry, chief attraction of the County's lava viewing site, began a gradual decline in early December, carrying less and less lava until it stopped completely by January 22.

USGS
February 7, 2002

Every year about Super Bowl time, Dick Fiske and Tim Rose, volcanologists from the Smithsonian Institution, join HVO's staff for 2-3 weeks to investigate the explosive history of Kilauea. From this combined work, much new information about past explosions has been acquired.

USGS
January 31, 2002

At dawn on January 17, 2002, the residents of Goma, a city of 500,000 along the eastern border of the Republic of Congo, awoke to glowing red skies and falling ash. A large eruption of Mount Nyiragongo was underway, the first since 1977.

photo of lava
January 25, 2002

Rootless shields and hornitos along the main tube system

USGS
January 24, 2002

In one of the most ambitious volcano-monitoring efforts ever undertaken, scientists of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) are moving ahead with plans to increase the number of volcanoes they monitor with real-time geophysical instruments.

Map showing the lava flow from the 1859 Mauna Loa eruption
January 17, 2002

The 1859 eruption of Mauna Loa began in the evening of January 23. Following a brief summit eruption, an outbreak occurred high on Mauna Loa's northwest flank at the 3380 m (11,090 ft) elevation. The eruption ultimately destroyed a coastal village and fishponds at Wainanali`i and Kiholo, on the west coast of the island.

photo of lava
January 17, 2002

Views of 2220' rootless shield and 2300' growing hornito

photo of lava
January 11, 2002

A week's growth at the Kamoamoa bench and at a hornito