Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 366
Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 27, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Wednesday, June 27

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 26, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 26, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 26, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Tuesday, June 26

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 25, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 25, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 24, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Sunday, June 24

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 22, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 22, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 21, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Thursday, June 21.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 19, 2018

Map as of 1:00 p.m. HST, June 19, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 19, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Tuesday, June 19

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 18, 2018

Map as of 9:00 a.m. HST, June 18, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 16, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Saturday, June 16.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 15, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 15, 2018

Filter Total Items: 116
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2001

Sedimentation History of Waimaluhia Reservoir during Highway Construction, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-98

Nine sedimentation surveys conducted from 1983 to 1998 at Waimaluhia Reservoir determined the rate of sediment accumulation in the reservoir during H-3 Highway construction upstream of the reservoir. Rates of storage-capacity loss ranged from 1.1 acre-feet per year between 1983 and 1988 to 4.9 acre-feet per year between 1988 and 1992. The average...

Wong, Michael F.
Sedimentation History of Waimaluhia Reservoir during Highway Construction, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-98; 2001; WRI; 2001-4001; Wong, Michael F.

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Year Published: 2001

Statistical Summary of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Data from the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe Drainage Basins Before, During, and After H-3 Highway Construction, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-99

This report provides statistical summaries of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water-quality data collected in the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe drainage basins before, during, and after construction of the H-3 Highway on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Methods of data collection also are described. Data collected during water years 1983...

Wong, Michael F.; Young, Stacie T.M.
Statistical Summary of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Data from the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe Drainage Basins Before, During, and After H-3 Highway Construction, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-99; 2001; OFR; 2001-64; Wong, Michael F.; Young, Stacie T. M.

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Year Published: 2001

Seismic hazard in Hawaii: High rate of large earthquakes and probabilistics ground-motion maps

The seismic hazard and earthquake occurrence rates in Hawaii are locally as high as that near the most hazardous faults elsewhere in the United States. We have generated maps of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration (SA) (at 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0 sec, 5% critical damping) at 2% and 10% exceedance probabilities in 50 years. The...

Klein, F. W.; Frankel, A.D.; Mueller, C.S.; Wesson, R.L.; Okubo, P.G.
Seismic hazard in Hawaii: High rate of large earthquakes and probabilistics ground-motion maps; 2001; Article; Journal; Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America; Klein, F. W.; Frankel, A. D.; Mueller, C. S.; Wesson, R. L.; Okubo, P. G.

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Year Published: 2000

Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii

Management of the ground-water resources near Kualapuu on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, is hindered by the uncertainty in the vertical salinity structure in the aquifer. In the State of Hawaii, vertical profiles of ground-water salinity are commonly obtained from deep monitor wells, and these profiles are used to estimate the thicknesses of the...

Oki, Delwyn S.
Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii; 2000; WRI; 99-4291; Oki, Delwyn S.

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Year Published: 2000

Gravitational stability of three-dimensional stratovolcano edifices

Catastrophic flank collapses have occurred at many stratovolcanoes worldwide. We present a three-dimensional (3-D) slope stability analysis for assessing and quantifying both the locations of minimum edifice stability and the expected volumes of potential failure. Our approach can search the materials underlying a topographic surface, represented...

Reid, M.E.; Christian, S.B.; Brien, D.L.

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Year Published: 1996

Summary of the Oahu, Hawaii, Regional Aquifer-System Analysis

Oahu, the third largest of the Hawaiian islands, is formed by the eroded remnants of two elongated shield volcanoes with broad, low profiles. Weathering and erosion have modified the original domed surfaces of the volcanoes, leaving a landscape of deep valleys and steep interfluvial ridges in the interior highlands. The Koolau Range in eastern...

Nichols, William D.; Shade, Patricia J.; Hunt, Charles D.
Summary of the Oahu, Hawaii, Regional Aquifer-System Analysis; 1996; PP; 1412-A; Nichols, William D.; Shade, Patricia J.; Hunt, Charles D., Jr.

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Year Published: 1995

Estimated Water Use in 1990, Island of Kauai, Hawaii

The estimated total quantity of freshwater withdrawn on the island of Kauai, Hawaii, in 1990 was 370.84 million gallons per day of which 46.29 million gallons per day (12 percent) was from ground-water sources, and 324.55 million gallons per day (88 percent) was from surface-water sources. An additional estimated 40.94 million gallons per day of...

Shade, Patricia J.
Estimated Water Use in 1990, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; 1995; WRI; 93-4180; Shade, Patricia J.

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Year Published: 1990

National water summary 1987: Hydrologic events and water supply and use

Water use in the United States, as measured by freshwater withdrawals in 1985, averaged 338,000 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), which is enough water to cover the 48 conterminous States to a depth of about 2.4 inches. Only 92,300 Mgal/d, or 27.3 percent of the water withdrawn, was consumptive use and thus lost to immediate further use; the...

Carr, Jerry E.; Chase, Edith B.; Paulson, Richard W.; Moody, David W.
National water summary 1987: hydrologic events and water supply and use; 1990; WSP; 2350; Carr, Jerry E.; Chase, Edith B.; Paulson, Richard W.; Moody, David W.

Filter Total Items: 2,090
Color photograph of lava lake
April 2, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption — April 2, 2021

A telephoto image from the ongoing eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Lava continues to enter the lava lake through an inlet near the base of the west vent cone (right). An incandescent opening near the top of the cone (upper center), ejected occasional bursts of spatter. Crustal foundering of a section of the lava lake surface crust (lower

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Color photograph of volcanic vent
April 2, 2021

Vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit - April 2, 2021

Telephoto image of the western cone complex of the current eruption in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit. In the center, a horseshoe-shaped spatter rampart is partially filled in by a more recent spatter cone. The cone has an incandescent opening that spatter is occasionally erupted from. Behind the main cone (to the right in the image) is another spatter cone, darker in

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Color photograph of lava lake
April 2, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption — April 2, 2021

A wide view of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The western vent and perched lava lake remain active in the western portion of the crater (left). Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain elevated, with the most recent measurement being 1,200 tonnes per day on April 1. USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither on April 2, 2021.

Color photograph of volcanic vent
April 1, 2021

March 31, 2021 - Photo of Halema‘uma‘u western fissure

This March 31, 2021, photo shows a close-up view of the active western fissure of Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i. Near the bottom of the photo, orange incandescence can be seen from two circular vents of the spatter cones. The orange area above the vents is where lava is entering the lava lake, and the orange area in upper right side of the photo

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March 30, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u Lava Lake Inlet (March 30, 2021)

The lava lake remains active in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. This video shows the inlet where lava from the western fissure is supplied to the lake. The motion of the lava stream is sluggish, and this video is shown at 20x speed.
 

Color map of lava lake at volcano summit
March 29, 2021

March 29, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake

This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines (dark gray) that mark locations of equal elevation above sea level (asl). The map shows that the lava lake has filled 224 m (735 ft) of the crater, to an elevation of 741 m (2431 ft) asl since the eruption began on December 20, 2020. Contour lines highlighted in green, purple, and blue mark

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Color photograph of lava lake
March 29, 2021

March 27, 2021 — Kīlauea

A close up of the inlet where lava from the western fissure feeds into the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was sluggish, with the movement barely perceptible with the naked eye. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of lava lake
March 29, 2021

March 27, 2021 — Kīlauea

The lava lake remains active in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The surface area of the active lava lake has slowly decreased over the past several months, with the active surface lava now limited to a portion of the west side of lake. The lake remains perched several meters (yards) above its surroundings, bound by a steep levee on most sides. USGS photo by

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Morning light illuminates the active west vent spatter cones from the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption at Kīlauea summit
March 26, 2021

West vent cones in the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption

Morning light illuminates the active west vent spatter cones from the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption at Kīlauea Volcano's summit on Friday, March 26, 2021. Several of the cones were actively degassing but no spatter or lava flows were observed. USGS Photo by K. Lynn.

A close-up aerial view of the southern active lava lake margin within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit
March 26, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 26, 2021

A close-up aerial view of the southern active lava lake margin within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. The formation of the levee containing the “perched” active lava lake (center to upper-right) is partially due to crustal plates from the active lake surface being pushed onto the rim of the lava lake. See the magnified image of the levee (lower-left) for a more

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a comparison of ongoing activity in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, with a 2007 lava channel on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone
March 26, 2021

A comparison of perched lava lake and lava channel levees—Kīlauea

This figure shows a comparison of ongoing activity in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, with a 2007 lava channel on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. On the left, a photo shows the levee that is containing the active perched lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u. The levee is formed in part from rafted pieces of surface crust that are pushed onto the levee by the lake circulation, with

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A telephoto view of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a HVO helicopter overflight
March 26, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 26, 2021

A telephoto view of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory helicopter overflight of Kīlauea summit. The west vent continues to supply lava into the active western portion of the lava lake from two adjacent inlets at its base (center-left). A pile of rubble, from a partial collapse of the cone several weeks ago, remains on the

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Filter Total Items: 2,268
Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, Feb. 9, shows the stagnant, crusted-over eastern portion of the lava lake
February 18, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

This thermal image taken during the February 1 helicopter overflight shows the features of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u
February 18, 2021

Kīlauea’s current lava lake formed on December 20th and rose rapidly within Halema‘uma‘u crater during the dynamic first week of the ongoing summit eruption. Near the end of December, the eruption stabilized and the lava lake has been slowly changing since then.

Overflight photo of erupting western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u, February 16, 2021
February 17, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

This telephoto image of the western vent was taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit.
February 16, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of lava
February 12, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Portrait of a man wearing glasses and a blue shirt
February 11, 2021

The next USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) Scientist-in-Charge (SIC) has been named, and it’s a name that Island of Hawai‘i residents may be familiar with—Dr. Ken Hon! Ken will be the 21rst Scientist-in-Charge filling a position originally created by Thomas A. Jaggar, who founded HVO in 1912 and directed it until 1940. 

A wide aerial photo of the active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a Kīlauea summit overflight on February 9
February 10, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of lava lake
February 9, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

An aerial view of Halema‘uma‘u crater from the northeast during a helicopter overflight of the Kīlauea summit eruption
February 5, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Aerial view of the Hōlei Pali along Kīlauea’s south flank.
February 4, 2021

This story begins after Kīlauea’s May 4, 2018, M6.9 earthquake and lower East Rift Zone eruption. The M6.9 earthquake resulted in seaward motion at the surface of Kīlauea’s south flank of up to approximately 0.5 m (1.5 ft) as measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring stations operated by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO).

No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater during yesterday's helicopter overflight.
February 3, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

This thermal image taken during the February 1 helicopter overflight shows the features of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u
February 2, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.