Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 2,359
June 29, 2016

Flow Front Moving Through Vegetation

The lava flow southeast of Pu'u 'Ō'ō continues to advance downslope, and was reaching the base of the pali today. Although the malority of the flow activity is pāhoehoe, the fast-moving flow front IS channe ized 'a'ā. The leading tip of the flow is burning vegetation in a kīpuka.

Typical lava lake activity at Kīlauea's summit, slowly rising lake ...
June 28, 2016

Typical lava lake activity at Kīlauea's summit, slowly rising

Spattering was vigorous in the Kīlauea's summit lava lake this evening, but within the range of normal variation. Spatter was thrown up to the level of the floor of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, about 25 m (80 ft) above the lake surface.

The lake level has been slowly rising over the past week, and spattering has been visible from the Jaggar Overlook over the past few

...
An HVO geologist photographs an active ‘A‘ā flow on Kīlauea Volcano...
June 28, 2016

An Geologist photographs an active ‘a‘ā flow on Kīlauea, Hawai‘i, d...

At the time the photograph was taken, the active lava flow from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō was on the slope near the top of the Pūlama pali, one of the steep escarpments on Kīlauea's southeast flank, and had transitioned into a channelized ‘a‘ā flow.

June 28, 2016

Channelized `A`ā Forming

The lava flow southeast of Pu'u 'Ō'ō continues to advance downslope, and is now progressing down the pali. The flow is following the eastern boundary of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, and the western boundary of the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision. Although the majority of the flow activity is pāhoehoe, the fast-moving flow front is channelized 'a'ā. The leading tip

Underwater photo showing a scuba diver near a coral reef wall with small fish swimming off to the side.
June 27, 2016

Diving Molokini Crater

A diver examines the coral reef along Molokini Crater off of the island of Maui, Hawaii.

June 27, 2016

Spattering at Kīlauea's Summit Lava Lake

The lava lake at Kilauea's summit has risen over the past few days, providing improved views of the lake activity. Spattering along the southern lake margin was vi orous this evening, but within the range of normal activity for the la e. Spatter was thrown as high as the Halema'uma'u Crater floor, about 25 m (80 ft) above the lake surface. This video was taken from the rim

Re-thinking Kīlauea Volcano's early known eruptive history...
June 24, 2016

Re-thinking Kīlauea's early known eruptive history

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists investigate a portion of the Great Crack in the Keaiwa flow field on Kīlauea Volcano's Southwest Rift Zone. USGS photo.

Aerial view of a lava vent seen from a helicopter
June 16, 2016

Lava Vent Aerial over Puʻu ʻŌʻō, Hawaiʻi

Though difficult to photograph, aerial views showed that this open vent was but a small window into a large, hot cavity beneath Puʻu ʻŌʻō's northeast flank in Hawaii Inside, streams of lava from an unseen source (or sources) closer to the crater rim (visible at lower right) were cascading toward the upper left into unknown depths. This view, looking almost straight down,

...
Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Zone's eruptions stopped traffic—and more...
June 9, 2016

Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Zone's eruptions stopped traffic—and more

This rapidly moving ‘A‘ā lava flow was one of several that advanced down the west flank of Mauna Loa during the volcano's 1950 eruption. The massive flow, tens of meters (yards) high, traveled from the Southwest Rift Zone vent to the ocean, a distance of about 18 km (11 mi), in around 18 hours. Two earlier flows from this eruption reached the ocean in as little as three

...
June 2, 2016

Skylight and Small Flow

The two breakouts that began at Pu'u 'Ō'ō on May 24 are still active. This morning, the active portions of both flows remained relatively short, extending no more than 1 km (0.6 miles) from their breakout points. The eastern breakout, shown here, was developing a lava tube. A collapse in the roof of the tube provided a view of the lava stream. This lava was feeding small

Video of spattering along the north margin of Kīlauea Volcano's sum...
May 27, 2016

Spattering along north margin of Kīlauea's summit lava lake

Video of spattering along the north margin of Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake.

Filter Total Items: 2,351
USGS
September 25, 2003

Good red wine improves with age. So, often, does research. With time, more information is gathered, more thought given, and more sophisticated analysis attempted. The end result may be not only greater accuracy but even elegance.

USGS
September 18, 2003

On May 10, 2003, Anatahan Volcano in the Northern Marianas Islands awoke for the first time in reported history and sent eruption cloud to heights reaching 10 km (approximately 6 miles). The unrest heralded by this event -- described in Volcano Watch reports of May 15 and June 26 -- continues.

Lava drains back into the East Pond Vent, Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, Hawai‘i...
September 12, 2003

Lava drains back into the East Pond Vent, Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, Hawai‘i.

USGS
September 11, 2003

Norris Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park has long been recognized as the hottest and most changeable of Yellowstone's famous hydrothermal wonders.

USGS
September 4, 2003

Kīlauea has erupted about 0.13 cubic kilometers (170 million cubic yards) of lava yearly for more than 20 years. That's enough to fill almost 2 1/2 craters the size of Halemaumau each year. The entire eruption has produced enough lava to fill 50 such craters.

photo of lave
August 29, 2003

Verrrry layyyyzeeee Friday at southeast tip of Kohola

USGS
August 28, 2003

The 1840 eruption on Kīlauea's east rift zone was one of the most notable of the past 200 years. People reported a spectacle so awesome that "one could read newsprint at night in Hilo (30 km [18 miles] away) by its light!" The eruption created the picturesque Sand Hills near Honolulu Landing.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 27, 2003

A moderate earthquake rattled the Big Island of Hawai?i late Tuesday. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports that the earthquake, with a preliminary magnitude of 5.0, was centered about 30 miles south-southwest of Hilo, Hawai?i, in the Hawai?i Volcanoes National Park, near the base of Kilauea. It struck about 8:24 p.m. local time. Several small aftershocks have been reported.