Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Image: An Endangered Honeycreeper, the  `Akeke`e (Kauai Akepa), in Hawaii

An Endangered Honeycreeper, the `Akeke`e (Kauai Akepa), in Hawaii

Many species of Hawaiian honeycreepers have persisted into the 20th century because high elevation rain forests on the islands of Kaua’i, Maui, and Hawai’i are cool enough to limit transmission of introduced avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum). Malaria transmission is tied closely to the effects of temperature on development of malarial parasites within their

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USGS
August 3, 2021

Aggregates Data by State, Type, and End Use; 1971–2018

This data set contains supplemental aggregates data for the USGS Minerals Yearbook Volume II—Area Reports: Domestic. It contains data for the years 1971 through 2018 and replaces the discrete construction aggregate tables that were included in the individual State chapters prior to 2014. It contains

Image: Minute Gem Snail (Hawaiia minuscula)

Minute Gem Snail (Hawaiia minuscula)

Hawaiia minuscula shell viewed with a scanning electron microscope with aperture facing up.

Attribution: Ecosystems

Ohia seedling in an unweeded (left) and weeded (right) plot

ʻŌhiʻa seedlings were planted and monitored in plots with (left) and without (right) weeding treatments.

Children pose with 8 ton ballistic block at Kīlauea volcano, Hawai‘...

Children pose with 8 ton ballistic block at Kīlauea, Hawai‘i.

Some of the large ballistic blocks from the Kīlauea eruption of 1924 later became visitor attractions. Many of these blocks remain in place today as evidence of the forces unleashed at Kīlauea during the eruption of 1924.

Clear day view of PE cam

[PEcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō East Flank from East of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

This image is from a temporary research camera positioned northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, on Puʻu Halulu, looking southwest toward the northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light

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Image: An Endangered Honeycreeper, the `Akikiki (Kaua`i Creeper), in Hawaii

An Endangered Honeycreeper, the `Akikiki (Kaua`i Creeper), in Hawaii

Many species of Hawaiian honeycreepers have persisted into the 20th century because high elevation rain forests on the islands of Kaua’i, Maui, and Hawai’i are cool enough to limit transmission of introduced avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum). Malaria transmission is tied closely to the effects of temperature on development of malarial parasites within their

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KW webcam shows that Halema‘uma‘u lava lake island rotated

The KW webcam continues to document activity in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea's summit. The webcam is located on the west rim of the crater, and looks to the east across Halema‘uma‘u (in the images, north is to the left and south is to the right). The first image, taken at just after 6:30 a.m. HST on December 27, 2020, HST shows the largest island in the lava lake

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Island of Hawai‘i map, showing Mauna Loa and the other four volcano...

Island of Hawai‘i map, showing Mauna Loa and the other four volcano...

Island of Hawai‘i map, showing Mauna Loa and the other four volcanoes that make up the island. Mauna Loa structural features include summit caldera, rift zones, radial vents, and historical lava flows.

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USGS
May 12, 1996

This month marks the 72nd anniversary of the last large explosive eruption of Kīlauea Volcano. The atypical "Hawaiian" eruption occurred in Halema'uma'u Crater when groundwater came into contact with hot rocks surrounding the magma. 

USGS
May 11, 1996

As geologists working at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, we give many talks about the current eruption of Kīlauea, and people in the audience typically ask lots of questions about how volcanoes behave and how we attempt to predict that behavior.

USGS
May 3, 1996

Last week scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) began their annual ground deformation surveys at the summit of Mauna Loa Volcano. Comprehensive monitoring of ground deformation and earthquake activity (seismicity) provides the most reliable criteria for forecasting volcanic eruptions.
 

Experiment helps show how calderas are created...
April 27, 1996

Visitors to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are treated to spectacular views of Kīlauea caldera and Halema'uma'u pit crater from the many summit overlooks.

USGS
April 20, 1996

As summer is quickly approaching, it seems appropriate to write about the student worker and volunteer programs at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. 

New ocean entry for lava...
April 12, 1996

The latest development in Kīlauea's ongoing eruption is a new ocean entry near Lae`apuki inside Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

USGS
April 5, 1996

When visitors to this island arrive at the Keahole airport and travel along the Queen Ka'ahumanu highway to a hotel in south Kohala, they cannot help but notice the bare, black, glistening fields of lava. The flows, with their glassy surfaces, appear to have erupted yesterday.
 

USGS
March 29, 1996

On Monday, April 1, 1996, scientists, historians, and public officials from Japan and the United States will convene in Hilo for a symposium to commemorate the 50th and 100th anniversaries of the disastrous tsunami earthquakes in the Aleutian Islands and in Sanriku, Japan, respectively.

USGS
March 22, 1996

On March 1, 1996, Dr. Margaret Thair Mangan succeeded David A. Clague as Scientist-in-Charge of the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and became the fifteenth person to lead this illustrious institution in its 84-year history.
 

Lava ccean entry and bench collapse...
March 15, 1996

The 13-year-old East Rift Zone eruption of Kīlauea Volcano has returned to the steady-state condition that existed prior to the dramatic eruptive surge on February 1st.

USGS
March 8, 1996

Monday, March 11, marks the anniversary of the last of a series of dramatic collapses at Kīlauea summit. On three occasions in February and March 1960 the floor of Halemaumau Crater broke apart and collapsed inward, raising a roiling black column of steam and rock dust 500 feet in the air. 

USGS
March 2, 1996

I will end my series of these columns with some thoughts about preparedness for future disasters and some personal thank-yous.