Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 68
Date published: June 27, 2017

Hawai‘i Carbon Storage and Greenhouse Gas Flux Assessment

In recent years, the U.S. Geological Survey has been conducting a national biologic carbon sequestration assessment in the conterminous U.S.  The assessment is designed to meet the requirements of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which calls for coverage of all 50 states and all ecosystems (including forests, grasslands, wetlands, agricultural lands, and rivers, lakes, and...

Date published: June 22, 2017
Status: Active

Ecology of Hawaiian Waterbirds

Loss of wetlands, invasive plants, and non-native predators pushed Hawaii’s waterbirds to the brink of extinction by the early 1900s, although population numbers have improved somewhat in recent decades with conservation efforts. Nonetheless, all Hawaiian waterbirds have global population sizes estimated around or below below 2,000 individuals, making them still highly vulnerable to extinction...

Date published: June 14, 2017
Status: Active

Monitoring and Researching Bat Activity at Wind Turbines with Videography

The rapid expansion of wind energy nationwide is an important step toward reducing dependence on non-renewable sources of power.  However, the magnitude of the wildlife impacts at wind energy facilities is a newly recognized threat, and the cumulative long-term impacts to various bat species are of increasing concern.  It is estimated that more than 450,000 bat fatalities now occur each year...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Disease Ecology In the Pacific Basin: Wildlife and Public Health Concerns

Both wildlife and human health in Hawai‘i and other island ecosystems in the Pacific Basin face continued threats from introductions of diseases and vectors. Accidental introduction of mosquito-borne avian malaria and pox virus to Hawai‘i is an outstanding example of how biological invasions can have a profound effect on endemic wildlife. The geographic distribution, density, and community...

Date published: March 16, 2017
Status: Active

Population Genetics and Emergency Management of Two Kauai Island Endangered Species

The Challenge: The Akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris) and the Akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi), two species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, are critically endangered bird species endemic to high elevation ohia forests on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.  Both species have suffered severe population declines and range contractions in recent decades.  Akeke’e are currently thought to number ca. 950 wild...

Date published: December 7, 2016
Status: Active

Uncovering the Ecosystem Service Value of Carbon Sequestration in National Parks

The National Park Service (NPS) preserves and protects more than 84 million acres of important historic, cultural, and natural resources across 401 sites for the enjoyment of present and future generations. Protected resources and landscapes managed by the National Park Service contribute to the societal welfare of the American public, reflected by ecosystem service values derived from their...

Date published: December 4, 2016
Status: Active

Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Everglades

Invasive species are considered to be second only to habitat degradation in terms of negative impacts on the Earth’s ecosystems, and our scientists make up a significant proportion of the global expertise in the rapidly-growing problem of invasive reptiles.

Date published: December 1, 2016
Status: Active

USGS Brown Treesnake Laboratory and Rapid Response Facility - Guam

USGS scientists and staff associated with the Brown Treesnake Project are co-located at the Guam National Wildlife Refuge at the northern end of Guam in the western Pacific Ocean. Project staff work on developing and testing control tools for invasive brown treesnakes, as well as understanding their impacts on Guam's ecosystems. Project staff also lead the multi-agency Brown Treesnake Rapid...

Date published: October 19, 2016
Status: Active

Survival and Reintroduction of the Laysan Teal

The Challenge: The Laysan Teal is an endangered, endemic, Hawaiian dabbling duck that has been pushed to the brink of extinction numerous times. The previous range includes the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and its current range is less than 10 sq. km within the National Wildlife Refuges of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. This non-migratory waterfowl was eliminated from...

Date published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

HDgov: Multi-agency Website for Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

HDgov is an interactive and mobile-responsive online portal to interagency, academic, and non-government resources focused on the human dimensions of natural resource management. The web portal provides easy access to tools, publications, data, and methods that help ensure that the people side of natural resources is considered throughout the entire natural resource management process. The...

Date published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

National Park Service Visitor Spending Effects

The National Park Service (NPS) manages the Nation’s most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the Nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. USGS economists collaborate with the National Park Service social science program to estimate NPS...

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

North American Waterfowl Management Plan

The ultimate success of North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) depends on maintaining relevance to stakeholders and society. In order to be relevant, a first step is to better understand what people value in regard to waterfowl and their habitats. 

Filter Total Items: 89
Date published: June 18, 2018

Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Sea-level Rise Scenarios and Models 2010-2015

This data release consists of two ESRI geodatabases that store inundation areas for various future scenarios of sea-level rise, groundwater rise, and storm waves for Laysan Island and Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

Date published: March 23, 2018

HAVO Montane Ohia Diameter and Cavity Data 2017

We quantified the availability of breeding habitat of the endangered Hawaiian Akepa (Loxops coccineus). The species is thought to nest excusively in natural cavities within mature ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha) trees but birds commonly occur in short stature trees that presumably do not have any natural cavities because of their polyploidal (many-branched) structure.

Date published: October 24, 2017

Hawaii Land Cover and Habitat Status

These two raster data layers depict the land cover and degree of human disturbance to plant communities on the seven main Hawaiian Islands, and were developed as part of a comprehensive USGS assessment of carbon sequestration potential by natural ecosystems in the State of Hawaii.

Date published: October 24, 2017

Kanakaleonui Bird Corridor Montane Plants 2016

The datasets used in the the research project entitled, "Facilitating Adaptation in Montane Plants to Changing Precipitation along an Elevation Gradient," are presented. Report available.

Date published: October 24, 2017

Hawaiian Islands Coastal Vegetation Survey 2013-2015

 

This dataset provides information on the current status and various other habitat and descriptive attributes of the native coastal vegetation for seven of the main Hawaiian Islands (i.e., does not include Ni`ihau). Report available.

Date published: October 1, 2017

Oahu Tsunami Evacuation Dashboard

Tsunami waves created by earthquakes far from Hawai’i arrive hours later along Hawaiian shorelines but can be difficult to escape if everyone uses their cars to evacuate. Working with the Hawai’i Emergency Management Agency, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used computer modeling to identify areas where people should be able to evacuate on foot in less than 15 minutes. 

Date published: September 1, 2017

National Water Information System web interface (NWISweb)

The National Water Information System (NWIS) web application provides access to real-time and historical surface-water, groundwater, water-quality, and water-use data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites across all 50 states.

Date published: August 24, 2017

Coastal Change Hazards Portal

Interactive access to coastal change science and data for our Nation’s coasts. Information and products are organized within three coastal change hazard themes: 1) extreme storms, 2) shoreline change, and 3) sea-level rise. Displays probabilities of coastal erosion.

Date published: April 25, 2017

Coral growth parameters and seawater chemistry from Kahekili, west Maui, Hawaii

This data release contains time-series of seawater carbonate chemistry variables, including salinity, dissolved inorganic nutrients, pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon from sites along Kahekili Beach Park, west Maui, Hawai‘i. It also contains data from coral cores collected from the shallow reef at Kahekili in July 2013 and analyzed for coral growth parameters and geochemical...

Date published: January 1, 2017

Seawater carbonate chemistry, Kahekili, west Maui

Time-series of seawater carbonate chemistry variables, including salinity, dissolved inorganic nutrients, pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon from sites along Kahekili Beach Park, west Maui near submarine groundwater seeps and living coral reefs. Samples for seawater were collected by pumping bottom water from the seafloor using a peristaltic pump and collecting discr

Date published: January 1, 2017

Olowalu chronology and geochemistry time-series, West Maui

Chronology and time-series geochemistry data of a coral core collected from Olowalu, West Maui, Hawaii. The chronology is based on density banding, radiocarbon bomb-curve, and uranium thorium dating techniques. The geochemistry time-series data contains major and minor elements over the length of the coral life span, as measured from laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry

Filter Total Items: 375
This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines
February 5, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

A helicopter overflight on February 1, 2021, at approximately 10:30 a.m. HST allowed for aerial visual and thermal imagery
February 2, 2021

February 1, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake level and elevations of features within the caldera
January 29, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

Color map of volcano summit
January 25, 2021

January 25, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

This compilation shows nine thermal maps created for the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea
January 13, 2021

A compilation of nine thermal maps created for the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea.

A helicopter overflight on January 12, 2021, at approximately 11:00 a.m. HST
January 12, 2021

January 12, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Thermal map from a helicopter overflight on January 7, 2021, at approximately 10:30 a.m. HST
January 7, 2021

January 7, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Color map of lava lake temperature
January 6, 2021

January 5, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Color map of topography
January 6, 2021

This graphic depicts the changes to Kīlauea Volcano's summit, as a result of the ongoing eruption, between December 26, 2020, and January 5, 2021. 

Color map of volcano
December 31, 2020

December 31, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

A helicopter overflight today (Dec. 30, 2020) at approximately 10:00 AM HST
December 30, 2020

December 30, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Color thermal map of lava lake
December 29, 2020

December 28, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Filter Total Items: 121
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Year Published: 2013

Trends and shifts in streamflow in Hawaii, 1913-2008

This study addresses a need to document changes in streamflow and base flow (groundwater discharge to streams) in Hawai'i during the past century. Statistically significant long-term (1913-2008) downward trends were detected (using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test) in low-streamflow and base-flow records. These long-term downward trends are...

Bassiouni, Maoya; Oki, Delwyn S.
Trends and shifts in streamflow in Hawaii, 1913-2008; 2013; Article; Journal; Hydrological Processes; Bassiouni, Maoya; Oki, Delwyn S.

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Year Published: 2012

Availability and distribution of low flow in Anahola Stream, Kauaʻi, Hawaiʻi

Anahola Stream is a perennial stream in northeast Kauaʻi, Hawaiʻi, that supports agricultural, domestic, and cultural uses within its drainage basin. Beginning in the late 19th century, Anahola streamflow was diverted by Makee Sugar Company at altitudes of 840 feet (upper intake) and 280 feet (lower intake) for irrigating sugarcane in the Keālia...

Cheng, Chui Ling; Wolff, Reuben H.
Availability and distribution of low flow in Anahola Stream, Kauaʻi, Hawaiʻi; 2012; SIR; 2012-5264; Cheng, Chui Ling; Wolff, Reuben H.

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Year Published: 2012

Low-flow characteristics of streams under natural and diversion conditions, Waipiʻo Valley, Island of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi

Over the past 100 years, natural streamflow in Waipiʻo Valley has been reduced by the transfer of water out of the valley by Upper and Lower Hāmākua Ditches. The physical condition and diversion practices along the two ditch systems have varied widely over the years, and as a result, so have their effects on natural streamflow in Waipiʻo...

Fontaine, Richard A.
Low-flow characteristics of streams under natural and diversion conditions, Waipiʻo Valley, Island of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi; 2012; SIR; 2011-5118; Fontaine, Richard A.

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Year Published: 2012

Development of invertebrate community indexes of stream quality for the islands of Maui and Oahu, Hawaii

In 2009-10 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected physical habitat information and benthic macroinvertebrates at 40 wadeable sites on 25 perennial streams on the Island of Maui, Hawaiʻi, to evaluate the relations between the macroinvertebrate assemblages and environmental characteristics and to develop a multimetric invertebrate community...

Wolff, Reuben H.

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Year Published: 2012

Measurements of seepage losses and gains, East Maui Irrigation diversion system, Maui, Hawaiʻi

The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a field study from March to October 2011 to identify ditch characteristics and quantify seepage losses and gains in the East Maui Irrigation (EMI) diversion system, east Maui, Hawaiʻi. The EMI diversion system begins at Makapipi Stream in the east and ends at Māliko Gulch in the west. It consists of...

Cheng, Chui Ling
Measurements of seepage losses and gains, East Maui Irrigation diversion system, Maui, Hawaiʻi; 2012; OFR; 2012-1115; Cheng, Chui Ling

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Year Published: 2012

Sources of suspended sediment in the Waikele watershed, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi

Data from streamflow/sediment gages and measurements of changes in channel-bed sediment storage were gathered between October 1, 2007, and September 30, 2010, to assess the sources of suspended sediment in the Waikele watershed, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi. Streamflow from the watershed averaged 33 cubic feet per second during the study period, with...

Izuka, Scot K.
Sources of suspended sediment in the Waikele watershed, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi; 2012; SIR; 2012-5085; Izuka, Scot K.

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Year Published: 2012

Groundwater availability in the Lahaina District, west Maui, Hawai'i

Most of the public water supply in the Lahaina District, west Maui, Hawai'i, is pumped from a freshwater lens in volcanic rocks. Because of population growth, groundwater withdrawals from wells in this area are expected to increase from about 5.8 million gallons per day in 2007 to more than 11 million gallons per day by 2030. Currently (2011), the...

Gingerich, Stephen B.; Engott, John A.
Groundwater availability in the Lahaina District, west Maui, Hawai'i; 2012; SIR; 2012-5010; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Engott, John A.

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Year Published: 2012

Numerical simulation of flow in deep open boreholes in a coastal freshwater lens, Pearl Harbor Aquifer, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

The Pearl Harbor aquifer in southern O‘ahu is one of the most important sources of freshwater in Hawai‘i. A thick freshwater lens overlays brackish and saltwater in this coastal aquifer. Salinity profiles collected from uncased deep monitor wells (DMWs) commonly are used to monitor freshwater-lens thickness. However, vertical flow in...

Rotzoll, Kolja
Numerical simulation of flow in deep open boreholes in a coastal freshwater lens, Pearl Harbor Aquifer, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i; 2012; SIR; 2012-5009; Rotzoll, Kolja

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Year Published: 2011

From ridge to reef—linking erosion and changing watersheds to impacts on the coral reef ecosystems of Hawai‘i and the Pacific Ocean

Coral reef ecosystems are threatened by unprecedented watershed changes in the United States and worldwide. These ecosystems sustain fishing and tourism industries essential to the economic survival of many communities. Sediment, nutrients, and pollutants from watersheds are increasingly transported to coastal waters, where these contaminants...

Stock, Jonathan D.; Cochran, Susan A.; Field, Michael E.; Jacobi, James D.; Tribble, Gordon
From ridge to reef—linking erosion and changing watersheds to impacts on the coral reef ecosystems of Hawai‘i and the Pacific Ocean; 2011; FS; 2011-3049; Stock, Jonathan D.; Cochran, Susan A.; Field, Michael E.; Jacobi, James D.; Tribble, Gordon

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Year Published: 2011

A water-budget model and assessment of groundwater recharge for the Island of Hawaiʻi

Concern surrounding increasing demand for groundwater on the Island of Hawaiʻi, caused by a growing population and an increasing reliance on groundwater as a source for municipal and private water systems, has prompted a study of groundwater recharge on the island using the most current data and accepted methods. For this study, a daily water...

Engott, John A.
A water-budget model and assessment of groundwater recharge for the Island of Hawaiʻi; 2011; SIR; 2011-5078; Engott, John A.

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Year Published: 2011

Potential effects of roadside dry wells on groundwater quality on the Island of Hawai'i-Assessment using numerical groundwater models

Widespread use of dry wells to dispose of roadside runoff has raised concern about the potential effects on the quality of groundwater on the Island of Hawai‘i. This study used semi-generic numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport to assess the potential effect of dry wells on groundwater quality on the Island of Hawai...

Izuka, Scot K.
Potential effects of roadside dry wells on groundwater quality on the Island of Hawai'i-Assessment using numerical groundwater models; 2011; SIR; 2011-5072; Izuka, Scot K.

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Year Published: 2011

Small explosion from new vent at Kilauea’s summit

At 0258 Hawaii‐Aleutian Standard Time (HST) on 19 March 2008, a small explosion scattered altered and fresh lithic debris across a 40‐hectare area at the summit of Kilauea volcano. This explosion, the first recorded there since 1924, issued from a vent about 35 meters wide along the east wall of Halema'uma'u Crater. Ballistic fragments—the largest...

Wilson, David C.; Elias, Tamar; Orr, T.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Sutton, Jeff; Swanson, Don
Wilson, David, Elias, Tamar, Orr, Tim, Patrick, Matt, Sutton, Jeff, and Swanson, Don, 2008, Small explosion from new vent at Kilauea’s summit: Eos Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, v. 89, p. 203

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October 7, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption field work – October 7, 2021

An HVO geologist makes observations, collects data, and maintains instruments during the ongoing eruption within Halema'uma'u. This video shows some of the typical field work HVO geologists do during eruption monitoring, including collecting high-resolution videos, photos, and thermal images, taking laser rangefinder measurements, and maintaining field camera stations.

Color photograph of lava lake surface
October 7, 2021

October 7, 2021 — Kīlauea eruption

This photo from Thursday, October 7, shows the lava lake near the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The zig zag pattern separating the crustal plates is evident here, as are several spreading zones which cut across the pattern. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of volcanic vent
October 7, 2021

October 7, 2021 — Kīlauea eruption

A view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. This photo was taken from the northwest caldera rim, providing a good view inside the cone, as well as a view of the small spillway supplying lava into the lake. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color webcam photo of lava lake
October 7, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 7, 2021

KWcam image taken on October 7, 2021, just after 6 a.m. HST. This image shows the ongoing eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The eruption began the afternoon of September 29, 2021, as fissures in the floor of the crater; this activity is generating a lava lake that is slowly filling the crater. Near-real-time images captured by the KWcam are 

...
Color photograph of volcanic vent
October 7, 2021

October 7, 2021 — Kīlauea

The eruption continues in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Lava fountaining no longer emerges from the central portion of the lake, with fountaining limited to the west vent shown here. Low fountaining within the cone supplies lava into the lake via a short spillway. USGS image by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of lava
October 6, 2021

Crustal foundering in Halema‘uma‘u

A large crustal foundering event in Kīlauea's ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption occurred in the late afternoon on October 6, 2021. This photo was taken from the northwest crater rim looking east across the lava lake. USGS Photo: K. Lynn

Color photograph of lava fountain
October 6, 2021

West vent fountain on October 6, 2021

The west vent fountain in Kīlauea's ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption was 12 m (39 ft) above the lava lake surface in the late afternoon of October 6, 2021. This photo was taken by USGS geologist K. Lynn from the northwest rim of Halema‘uma‘u looking south.

Color map showing lava lake eruption features
October 5, 2021

October 5, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption reference map

This reference map depicts the ongoing Kīlauea summit eruption on October 5, 2021. Two eruptive vents are active at this time: one along the western edge of the rising lava lake, and one within the south-central portion of the lake. Several islands from the December 2020–May 2021 eruption dot the lake surface, some of which were initially drowned but later floated back to

...
Color photograph of scientist monitoring eruption
October 5, 2021

HVO geologist observing lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u - October 5, 2021

A Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) geologist notes observations of the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. HVO scientists continue to monitor the ongoing eruption from an area within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public due to hazardous conditions. USGS photo taken by N. Deligne on October 5, 2021.

Color photograph of active lava lake
October 5, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halema‘uma‘u crater - October 5, 2021

A view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the western crater rim looking east. The western vent (lower right) remains the dominant source of fountaining. One fountain remains active in the south portion of the lake (center right). The silver-grey lava comes from the western vent, and the dark black lava comes from the south

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Color photograph of vent and lava lake
October 5, 2021

Close-up view of west vent, Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea - October 5, 2021

Photo of fountaining from the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Spatter from the fountain continues to build up a horseshoe-shaped cone around the vent, with lava flowing into the lake at the base. This photo was taken from the western crater rim on October 5, 2021. USGS photo by N. Deligne.

Color photograph of volcanic vent
October 5, 2021

Western fissure, Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea - October 5, 2021

Lava fountains from the western fissure vent in the Halema‘uma‘u crater wall, at Kīlauea's summit during the ongoing eruption. USGS video by N. Deligne.

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USGS science for a changing world
August 28, 2021

Kīlauea volcano is not erupting. However, intrusive activity that began on August 23 continues south of Kīlauea caldera. Starting on the evening of August 26, ground deformation in Kīlauea’s south summit region resumed at the higher rates seen in the first intrusive pulse spanning August 23-25. 

USGS science for a changing world
August 27, 2021

The US Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) detected a resumption in earthquake activity and ground deformation beneath the south part of Kīlauea summit caldera, within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.

Plots of tiltmeter data and earthquake counts
August 26, 2021

Late Monday afternoon, earthquake activity picked up at Kīlauea’s summit.  At about 1:30 a.m. HST on Tuesday, that activity intensified, and it became clear that seismicity and increasing deformation were indicating a new intrusion of magma.  The seismicity extended southward from Hālemaʻumaʻu crater, to an area south of Kīlauea caldera.

USGS science for a changing world
August 26, 2021

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is lowering the Volcano Alert Level/Aviation Color Code for Kīlauea from WATCH/ORANGE to ADVISORY/YELLOW reflecting this decrease in activity levels.
 

USGS science for a changing world
August 26, 2021

Kīlauea volcano is not erupting. Over the past 24 hours, earthquake activity and ground deformation levels have decreased in the area beneath the southern part of Kīlauea’s summit caldera within the closed area of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. These observations indicate that the immediate potential for an eruption is diminished at this time.

USGS science for a changing world
August 24, 2021

The US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is raising the volcano alert level/aviation color code for Kīlauea from Advisory/Yellow to Watch/Orange due to earthquake activity in Kīlauea's south caldera region.

USGS science for a changing world
August 24, 2021

Kīlauea volcano is not erupting. The US Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has detected an increase in earthquake activity beneath the south part of Kīlauea summit caldera, within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The activity began around 4:30 p.m., HST, on August 23 and continued through the night and into the early morning of August 24, 2021.

A photo taken from within Nāhuku (Thurston Lava Tube), near the summit of Kīlauea
August 19, 2021

The 2018 lower East Rift Zone and 35-year-long Puʻuʻōʻō eruptions of Kīlauea had large impacts on the Puna District. Many residents were deeply affected by devastating lava flows, earthquakes, gas emissions, and other volcanic hazards. However, it is important to note that these eruptions are dwarfed compared to some past Kīlauea eruptions including the largest identified subaerial flow—‘Ailā‘au.

GPS campaign survey stations high on the flanks of Mauna Loa offer expansive views of neighboring volcanoes
August 19, 2021

HVO scientists collect high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data to assess hazards and understand evolving processes at Mauna Loa.

Over the past few months, HVO geophysicists have been conducting the annual high-precision GPS survey of Kīlauea
August 19, 2021

HVO scientists collect high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data to assess hazards and understand evolving processes at Kīlauea.

USGS science for a changing world
August 18, 2021

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.1 earthquake located east of Pāhala on Wednesday, August 18, at 2:02 a.m., HST.

An HVO scientist collects a carbon dioxide sample from an area within Kīlauea caldera emitting elevated levels of volcanic gas
August 16, 2021

HVO scientists—equipped with specialized safety gear—continue the Kīlauea caldera volcanic gas mapping within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

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