Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Map of flows from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō: September 12, 2003...
September 12, 2003

Map shows lava flows erupted during 1983-present activity of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and Kupaianaha. Red colors, both dark and light, denote Mother's Day flow, which began erupting on May 12, 2002 and continues to the present. The darkest color represents flows active since January 21, 2003.

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of July 2000...
July 1, 2000

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of July 2000, showing the area covered (mauve color) by lava since February 1997 during episode 55. Inside the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, the "trough" is the drained lava pond of September–October 1999. The central portion of the trough was briefly filled with lava in February 2000.

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of March 2000...
March 1, 2000

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of March 2000 showing the area covered (dark gray) by lava since February 1997 during episode 55. Inside the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, the "trough" is the drained lava pond of September–October 1999.

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Color photograph of volcanic vent and lava lake
February 11, 2021

February 11, 2021 — Kīlauea

The flow of the lake around a small island, south of the inlet zone, formed a heart-shaped outline in the western portion of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of volcanic vent and lava lake
February 11, 2021

February 11, 2021 — Kīlauea

No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater during the field visit to Kīlauea Volcano's summit on Thursday, February 11. The western fissure, shown here, remained active with lava entering the lake at the normal inlet site. The inlet consisted of a small upwelling zone that was raised several meters (yards) above the surrounding lake surface.

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February 11, 2021

Kīlauea Summit Eruption (Feb 11, 2021)

On February 11, 2021, no major changes were observed at the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The inlet site where lava is entering the lake had a small upwelling zone raised slightly above the surrounding lake surface. 

Color photograph of lava lake
February 10, 2021

February 10, 2021 — Kīlauea View of lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u

Twilight view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. This photo, taken from the southern rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater and looking northward, shows the active western (left) portion of the lava lake, which has hot incandescent lava visible at boundaries between plates on the lava lake. The inactive eastern (right) portion of the lake appears dark. USGS

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This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, February 9 shows the active western portion of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake
February 9, 2021

UAS photo of active western portion of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Feb. 9

This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, February 9 shows the active western portion of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake. The western fissure continues to supply lava to the lava lake from an inlet at the base of the spatter cone (upper-left). For scale, the distance from the lava inlet to the edge of the main island is approximately 160 m (525 ft). USGS has

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A wide aerial photo of the active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a Kīlauea summit overflight on February 9
February 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u overflight—Kīlauea summit Feb. 9, 2021

A wide aerial photo of the active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a Kīlauea summit overflight on February 9, 2021. This view, looking west, shows the active west vent degassing (center). Mauna Loa Volcano is visible in the background with a snow-covered summit. USGS photo taken by B. Carr.

This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, February 9, shows the main island in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake
February 9, 2021

UAS photo of main island in Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, February 9, 2021

This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, February 9, shows the main island in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake. The lake surface on the eastern (lower-center) side of the island has been stagnant and crusted over recently. The western fissure that has been feeding the lava lake is visibly degassing in the background. For scale, the island stretches

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An aerial view of the Halema‘uma‘u crater lava lake on Tuesday, February 9, 2021
February 9, 2021

Overflight view of Halema‘uma‘u crater—Kīlauea summit eruption Feb. 9

An aerial view of the Halema‘uma‘u crater lava lake on Tuesday, February 9, 2021 as viewed from the south during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea summit. Lava continues to erupt and enter into the lava lake from the inlet at the base of the west vent, which is visibly incandescent on the left in the photo. Only the western part of the lake surface remains active within a

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Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, Feb. 9, shows the stagnant, crusted-over eastern portion of the lava lake
February 9, 2021

UAS photo of crusted-over eastern portion of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake

This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, February 9, shows the stagnant, crusted-over eastern portion of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake. This photo is looking to the east, towards the easternmost end of the lake, with the active western fissure behind and out-of-view. For scale, the small island in the center of the photo is approximately 50 m (164 ft) in

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A zoomed-in aerial view of the active west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during the helicopter overflight on February 9
February 9, 2021

West vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater—Kīlauea summit eruption

A zoomed-in aerial view of the active west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during the helicopter overflight on February 9. Lava erupted from the west vent continues to enter the active lava lake through an inlet at the base of the cone. SO2 emission rates remain elevated and were measured at 2,200 t/d on February 1. USGS photo taken by B. Carr.

February 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u Crater Overflight—Kīlauea Volcano's Summit (Feb 9, 2021)

An overflight today provided aerial views of Kīlauea's ongoing summit eruption. No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater. Active surface lava is still largely limited to the western portion of the lake. Snow on Mauna Kea can be seen in the distance.
 

Color photograph of lava lake
February 8, 2021

February 8, 2021 — Kīlauea

Photo of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at Kīlauea summit. Photo taken from the west side of Kīlauea caldera rim taken at 3:04 p.m. HST. This photo shows the west vent feeding the active western part of the lava lake, as well as the inactive eastern part of the lava lake. There are some small breakouts of pāhoehoe lava int he western part of the lava lake that

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map of Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone
November 1, 2018

During Kīlauea Volcano's recent lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) eruption, lava-flow maps were a staple of the public outreach effort by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO).

panoramic view, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Crater Rim Drive
October 25, 2018

The 2018 summit collapse and lower East Rift Zone eruption at Kīlauea Volcano were dramatic and, for many Island of Hawai‘i residents, tragic events. As with all eruptive crises, these events offered exceptional opportunities to learn more about how volcanoes work and to answer some "bigger picture" questions.

thumbnail image of cover of Scientific Investigations Report 2018-5140
October 25, 2018

The U.S. Geological Survey assesses active and potentially active volcanoes in the U.S., focusing on history, hazards and the exposure of people, property and infrastructure to harm during an eruption. The findings are in the newly published 2018 Update to the U.S. Geological Survey National Volcanic Threat Assessment.

2018 Volcanic Threat Assessment helps prioritize risk efforts at U.S. volcanoes
October 24, 2018

Since 1980, there have been 120 eruptions and 52 episodes of notable volcanic unrest at 44 U.S. volcanoes.

Kīlauea volcanic ash sample
October 18, 2018

Sulfur dioxide (SO2)-rich emissions have long been a feature of Kīlauea Volcano's summit activity. However, vigorous volcanic ash production during the 2018 eruption raised new concerns about potential impacts for downwind communities.

inferred rupture area
October 11, 2018

On May 4, 2018, a powerful magnitude-6.9 earthquake on the south flank of Kīlauea Volcano shook the Island of Hawai‘i. It was the largest quake in Hawaii in 43 years. Today, more than five months later, smaller-magnitude earthquakes in the same area are still occurring.

USGS
October 9, 2018

Data Release: Volcanic ash leachate and rainwater chemistry from increased 2018 activity of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi

Volcano Craters
October 4, 2018

My 37-year stint with the U.S. Geological Survey—16 years at the Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) and 21 at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)—ends this month.

a tiltmeter is ready for installation
September 27, 2018

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) uses a diverse set of instruments to monitor active volcanoes in Hawaii. These include seismometers, gas sensors, Global Positioning System (GPS) stations, and webcams. Each provides a unique type of data critical to understanding volcanic systems.

thumbnail image of Preliminary summary of Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse
September 27, 2018

Overview of Kīlauea Volcano's activity from April 30 through September 22, 2018.

Thinly bedded Kīlauea explosion deposits
September 20, 2018

The limited collapse of the inner part of Kīlauea Volcano's caldera this summer fell well short of the larger summit-wide collapses that occurred in the past. How many such limited collapses can we recognize at Kīlauea before written records were kept? The answer is none.

seismologists install a nodal geophone on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone
September 13, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse provided a rare opportunity to study dynamic eruptive processes beneath and at the surface of the volcano.