Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 67
Date published: June 27, 2017

Hawai‘i Carbon Storage and Greenhouse Gas Flux Assessment

In recent years, the U.S. Geological Survey has been conducting a national biologic carbon sequestration assessment in the conterminous U.S.  The assessment is designed to meet the requirements of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which calls for coverage of all 50 states and all ecosystems (including forests, grasslands, wetlands, agricultural lands, and rivers, lakes, and...

Date published: June 22, 2017
Status: Active

Ecology of Hawaiian Waterbirds

Loss of wetlands, invasive plants, and non-native predators pushed Hawaii’s waterbirds to the brink of extinction by the early 1900s, although population numbers have improved somewhat in recent decades with conservation efforts. Nonetheless, all Hawaiian waterbirds have global population sizes estimated around or below below 2,000 individuals, making them still highly vulnerable to extinction...

Date published: June 14, 2017
Status: Active

Monitoring and Researching Bat Activity at Wind Turbines with Videography

The rapid expansion of wind energy nationwide is an important step toward reducing dependence on non-renewable sources of power.  However, the magnitude of the wildlife impacts at wind energy facilities is a newly recognized threat, and the cumulative long-term impacts to various bat species are of increasing concern.  It is estimated that more than 450,000 bat fatalities now occur each year...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Disease Ecology In the Pacific Basin: Wildlife and Public Health Concerns

Both wildlife and human health in Hawai‘i and other island ecosystems in the Pacific Basin face continued threats from introductions of diseases and vectors. Accidental introduction of mosquito-borne avian malaria and pox virus to Hawai‘i is an outstanding example of how biological invasions can have a profound effect on endemic wildlife. The geographic distribution, density, and community...

Date published: March 16, 2017
Status: Active

Population Genetics and Emergency Management of Two Kauai Island Endangered Species

The Challenge: The Akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris) and the Akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi), two species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, are critically endangered bird species endemic to high elevation ohia forests on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.  Both species have suffered severe population declines and range contractions in recent decades.  Akeke’e are currently thought to number ca. 950 wild...

Date published: December 4, 2016
Status: Active

Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Everglades

Invasive species are considered to be second only to habitat degradation in terms of negative impacts on the Earth’s ecosystems, and our scientists make up a significant proportion of the global expertise in the rapidly-growing problem of invasive reptiles.

Date published: December 1, 2016
Status: Active

USGS Brown Treesnake Laboratory and Rapid Response Facility - Guam

USGS scientists and staff associated with the Brown Treesnake Project are co-located at the Guam National Wildlife Refuge at the northern end of Guam in the western Pacific Ocean. Project staff work on developing and testing control tools for invasive brown treesnakes, as well as understanding their impacts on Guam's ecosystems. Project staff also lead the multi-agency Brown Treesnake Rapid...

Date published: October 19, 2016
Status: Active

Survival and Reintroduction of the Laysan Teal

The Challenge: The Laysan Teal is an endangered, endemic, Hawaiian dabbling duck that has been pushed to the brink of extinction numerous times. The previous range includes the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and its current range is less than 10 sq. km within the National Wildlife Refuges of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. This non-migratory waterfowl was eliminated from...

Date published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

HDgov: Multi-agency Website for Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

HDgov is an interactive and mobile-responsive online portal to interagency, academic, and non-government resources focused on the human dimensions of natural resource management. The web portal provides easy access to tools, publications, data, and methods that help ensure that the people side of natural resources is considered throughout the entire natural resource management process. The...

Date published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

National Park Service Visitor Spending Effects

The National Park Service (NPS) manages the Nation’s most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the Nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. USGS economists collaborate with the National Park Service social science program to estimate NPS...

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

North American Waterfowl Management Plan

The ultimate success of North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) depends on maintaining relevance to stakeholders and society. In order to be relevant, a first step is to better understand what people value in regard to waterfowl and their habitats. 

Date published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Monitoring Hawaiian Biodiversity: Changes to forest birds and their habitat

Hawaiian forests are beset by many stressors, resulting in a complex pattern of altered ecosystems, impeirled species, and (in some areas) substantial protection and restoration. Short-term studies focused on specific sites or biota have limited value in understanding landscape-level change. Long-term and spatialy extensive data are needed to understand how ecosystems are reacting to both...

Filter Total Items: 90
Date published: January 1, 2019

Time-series oceanographic data of currents and waves from bottom-mounted instrument packages off Waiakane, Molokai, HI, 2018

Time series data of water surface elevation, wave height, and water column currents and temperature were acquired at seven locations for 86 days off of Waiakane on the south coast of the island of Molokai, Hawaii, in support of a study on the coastal circulation patterns and the transformation of surface waves over the coral reefs.

Date published: June 18, 2018

Northwestern Hawaiian Islands: Impacts to Avifauna from the Tohoku Tsunami 2011

This collection of nine datasets covers Midway Atoll and Laysan Island in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and was created to help estimate the impacts of the March 11, 2011 tsunami event on avifauna in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 

Date published: June 18, 2018

Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Sea-level Rise Scenarios and Models 2010-2015

This data release consists of two ESRI geodatabases that store inundation areas for various future scenarios of sea-level rise, groundwater rise, and storm waves for Laysan Island and Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

Date published: March 23, 2018

HAVO Montane Ohia Diameter and Cavity Data 2017

We quantified the availability of breeding habitat of the endangered Hawaiian Akepa (Loxops coccineus). The species is thought to nest excusively in natural cavities within mature ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha) trees but birds commonly occur in short stature trees that presumably do not have any natural cavities because of their polyploidal (many-branched) structure.

Date published: October 24, 2017

Hawaii Land Cover and Habitat Status

These two raster data layers depict the land cover and degree of human disturbance to plant communities on the seven main Hawaiian Islands, and were developed as part of a comprehensive USGS assessment of carbon sequestration potential by natural ecosystems in the State of Hawaii.

Date published: October 24, 2017

Kanakaleonui Bird Corridor Montane Plants 2016

The datasets used in the the research project entitled, "Facilitating Adaptation in Montane Plants to Changing Precipitation along an Elevation Gradient," are presented. Report available.

Date published: October 24, 2017

Hawaiian Islands Coastal Vegetation Survey 2013-2015

 

This dataset provides information on the current status and various other habitat and descriptive attributes of the native coastal vegetation for seven of the main Hawaiian Islands (i.e., does not include Ni`ihau). Report available.

Date published: October 1, 2017

Oahu Tsunami Evacuation Dashboard

Tsunami waves created by earthquakes far from Hawai’i arrive hours later along Hawaiian shorelines but can be difficult to escape if everyone uses their cars to evacuate. Working with the Hawai’i Emergency Management Agency, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used computer modeling to identify areas where people should be able to evacuate on foot in less than 15 minutes. 

Date published: September 1, 2017

National Water Information System web interface (NWISweb)

The National Water Information System (NWIS) web application provides access to real-time and historical surface-water, groundwater, water-quality, and water-use data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites across all 50 states.

Date published: August 24, 2017

Coastal Change Hazards Portal

Interactive access to coastal change science and data for our Nation’s coasts. Information and products are organized within three coastal change hazard themes: 1) extreme storms, 2) shoreline change, and 3) sea-level rise. Displays probabilities of coastal erosion.

Date published: April 25, 2017

Coral growth parameters and seawater chemistry from Kahekili, west Maui, Hawaii

This data release contains time-series of seawater carbonate chemistry variables, including salinity, dissolved inorganic nutrients, pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon from sites along Kahekili Beach Park, west Maui, Hawai‘i. It also containsdata from coral cores collected from the shallow reef at Kahekili in July 2013 and analyzed for coral growth parameters and geochemical...

Filter Total Items: 366
Color map of volcano
December 31, 2020

December 31, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

A helicopter overflight today (Dec. 30, 2020) at approximately 10:00 AM HST
December 30, 2020

December 30, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Color thermal map of lava lake
December 29, 2020

December 28, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Graphic showing digital elevation models and profiles
December 28, 2020

This graphic depicts the changes to Kīlauea Volcano's summit resulting from the eruption that began on December 20, 2020.

Kīlauea summit eruption reference map showing the location of ongoing lake activity
December 27, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption reference map showing the location of ongoing lake activity

Color contour map
December 27, 2020

December 27, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

Color map of lava lake temperature
December 27, 2020

December 26, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Maps made from aerial imagery taken on a December 26 overflight of Kīlauea Volcano's summit
December 26, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption maps constructed from aerial imagery

Color map showing lava lake thickness
December 25, 2020

December 25, 2020 preliminary map of the lava lake depth at 2:15 p.m. HST.

Color thermal map of lava lake
December 24, 2020

December 23, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Lava lake level measurements collected during a field visit of Kīlauea Volcano's summit just after 11:44 a.m. HST on December 23
December 23, 2020

December 23, 2020 preliminary map of the lava lake depth at 11:44 a.m. HST.

Color thermal map of lava lake
December 22, 2020

December 22, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Filter Total Items: 114
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Year Published: 2012

Numerical simulation of flow in deep open boreholes in a coastal freshwater lens, Pearl Harbor Aquifer, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

The Pearl Harbor aquifer in southern O‘ahu is one of the most important sources of freshwater in Hawai‘i. A thick freshwater lens overlays brackish and saltwater in this coastal aquifer. Salinity profiles collected from uncased deep monitor wells (DMWs) commonly are used to monitor freshwater-lens thickness. However, vertical flow in...

Rotzoll, Kolja
Numerical simulation of flow in deep open boreholes in a coastal freshwater lens, Pearl Harbor Aquifer, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i; 2012; SIR; 2012-5009; Rotzoll, Kolja

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Year Published: 2011

From ridge to reef—linking erosion and changing watersheds to impacts on the coral reef ecosystems of Hawai‘i and the Pacific Ocean

Coral reef ecosystems are threatened by unprecedented watershed changes in the United States and worldwide. These ecosystems sustain fishing and tourism industries essential to the economic survival of many communities. Sediment, nutrients, and pollutants from watersheds are increasingly transported to coastal waters, where these contaminants...

Stock, Jonathan D.; Cochran, Susan A.; Field, Michael E.; Jacobi, James D.; Tribble, Gordon
From ridge to reef—linking erosion and changing watersheds to impacts on the coral reef ecosystems of Hawai‘i and the Pacific Ocean; 2011; FS; 2011-3049; Stock, Jonathan D.; Cochran, Susan A.; Field, Michael E.; Jacobi, James D.; Tribble, Gordon

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Year Published: 2011

A water-budget model and assessment of groundwater recharge for the Island of Hawaiʻi

Concern surrounding increasing demand for groundwater on the Island of Hawaiʻi, caused by a growing population and an increasing reliance on groundwater as a source for municipal and private water systems, has prompted a study of groundwater recharge on the island using the most current data and accepted methods. For this study, a daily water...

Engott, John A.
A water-budget model and assessment of groundwater recharge for the Island of Hawaiʻi; 2011; SIR; 2011-5078; Engott, John A.

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Year Published: 2011

Potential effects of roadside dry wells on groundwater quality on the Island of Hawai'i-Assessment using numerical groundwater models

Widespread use of dry wells to dispose of roadside runoff has raised concern about the potential effects on the quality of groundwater on the Island of Hawai‘i. This study used semi-generic numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport to assess the potential effect of dry wells on groundwater quality on the Island of Hawai...

Izuka, Scot K.
Potential effects of roadside dry wells on groundwater quality on the Island of Hawai'i-Assessment using numerical groundwater models; 2011; SIR; 2011-5072; Izuka, Scot K.

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Year Published: 2011

Small explosion from new vent at Kilauea’s summit

At 0258 Hawaii‐Aleutian Standard Time (HST) on 19 March 2008, a small explosion scattered altered and fresh lithic debris across a 40‐hectare area at the summit of Kilauea volcano. This explosion, the first recorded there since 1924, issued from a vent about 35 meters wide along the east wall of Halema'uma'u Crater. Ballistic fragments—the largest...

Wilson, David C.; Elias, Tamar; Orr, T.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Sutton, Jeff; Swanson, Don
Wilson, David, Elias, Tamar, Orr, Tim, Patrick, Matt, Sutton, Jeff, and Swanson, Don, 2008, Small explosion from new vent at Kilauea’s summit: Eos Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, v. 89, p. 203

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Year Published: 2011

Shallow degassing events as a trigger for very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

The first eruptive activity at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit in 25 years began in March 2008 with the opening of a 35-m-wide vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater. The new activity has produced prominent very-long-period (VLP) signals corresponding with two new behaviors: episodic tremor bursts and small explosive events, both of which represent degassing...

Patrick, Matthew R.; Wilson, David C.; Fee, David; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Don
Patrick, Matthew, Wilson, David, Fee, David, Orr, Tim, and Swanson, Don, 2011, Shallow degassing events as a trigger for very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Bulletin of Volcanology, v. 73, p. 1179–1186.

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Year Published: 2011

Hydrogeology of the Hawaiian islands

Volcanic-rock aquifers are the most extensive and productive aquifers in the Hawaiian Islands. These aquifers contain different types of groundwater systems depending on the geologic setting in which they occur. The most common groundwater systems include coastal freshwater-lens systems in the dike-free flanks of the volcanoes and dike-impounded...

Cabrera, Maria del Carmen; Lambán, Luis Javier; Valverde, Margarida; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Oki, Delwyn S.

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Year Published: 2011

Recent storm and tsunami coarse-clast deposit characteristics, southeast Hawai'i

Deposits formed by extreme waves can be useful in elucidating the type and characteristics of the depositional event. The study area on the southeast coast of the island of Hawaiʻi is characterized by the presence of geologically young basalts of known age that are mantled by recent wave-derived sedimentary deposits. The area has been impacted by...

Richmond, B.M.; Watt, Sebastian; Buckley, M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Morton, R.A.
Recent storm and tsunami coarse-clast deposit characteristics, southeast Hawai'i; 2011; Article; Journal; Marine Geology; Richmond, B. M.; Watt, S.; Buckley, M.; Jaffe, B. E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Morton, R. A.

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Year Published: 2010

Changes of freshwater-lens thickness in basaltic island aquifers overlain by thick coastal sediments

Freshwater-lens thickness and long-term changes in freshwater volume in coastal aquifers are commonly assessed through repeated measurement of salinity profiles from monitor wells that penetrate into underlying salt water. In Hawaii, the thickest measured freshwater lens is currently 262 m in dike-free, volcanic-rock aquifers that are overlain by...

Rotzoll, Kolja; Oki, Delwyn S.; El-Kadi, Aly I.

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Year Published: 2010

Effects of groundwater withdrawal on borehole flow and salinity measured in deep monitor wells in Hawai'i-implications for groundwater management

Water-resource managers in Hawai`i rely heavily on salinity profiles from deep monitor wells to estimate the thickness of freshwater and the depth to the midpoint of the transition zone between freshwater and saltwater in freshwater-lens systems. The deep monitor wells are typically open boreholes below the water table and extend hundreds of feet...

Rotzoll, Kolja
Effects of groundwater withdrawal on borehole flow and salinity measured in deep monitor wells in Hawai'i-implications for groundwater management; 2010; SIR; 2010-5058; Rotzoll, Kolja

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Year Published: 2010

Streamflow, suspended-sediment, and soil-erosion data from Kaulana and Hakioawa watersheds, Kaho'olawe, Hawai'i,

Various events over the last two centuries have destroyed the vegetation and caused rapid soil erosion on large areas of the small, arid, windy tropical shield-volcano island of Kaho`olawe, Hawai`i. These activities were largely halted in the 1990s, and efforts have been made to restore the island's vegetation in order to stem erosion. In 2003,...

Izuka, Scot K.; Abbott, Lyman L.
Streamflow, suspended-sediment, and soil-erosion data from Kaulana and Hakioawa watersheds, Kaho'olawe, Hawai'i,; 2010; OFR; 2010-1182; Izuka, Scot K.; Abbott, Lyman L.

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Year Published: 2010

Hawaii StreamStats; a web application for defining drainage-basin characteristics and estimating peak-streamflow statistics

Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are necessary for the safe and efficient design of roads, bridges, water-conveyance structures, and flood-control projects and for the management of flood plains and flood-prone areas. StreamStats provides a simple, fast, and reproducible method to define drainage-basin characteristics...

Rosa, Sarah N.; Oki, Delwyn S.
Hawaii StreamStats; a web application for defining drainage-basin characteristics and estimating peak-streamflow statistics; 2010; FS; 2010-3052; Rosa, Sarah N.; Oki, Delwyn S.

Filter Total Items: 2,073
Digital elevation model of crater and lava lake
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u DEM May 13, 2021

A helicopter overflight on May 13, 2021, at approximately 11:30 a.m. HST allowed for aerial visual and thermal imagery to be collected of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. The visual images were used to create a digital elevation model (DEM) of the crater, shown here. The many islands and levees formed at different times during the

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on the morning of May 13
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on the morning of May 13. Though no incandescence was visible during the overflight, field crews monitoring the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u from the ground observed a small amount of fluid lava on the surface later in the day. In this aerial photo, the west vent area is in the

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More of Kīlauea's lava lake surface in Halema‘uma‘u crater has solidified in recent weeks, evident in this May 13 aerial view
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

More of Kīlauea's lava lake surface in Halema‘uma‘u crater has solidified in recent weeks, as is evident in this aerial view taken yesterday, May 13. However, gas emissions and small patches of active lava on the surface indicate that the eruption continues. Most recently, gas emissions were measured as 225 tonnes per day on May 12. The bluish-tinged plume of volcanic gas

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A low, oblique aerial view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

A low, oblique aerial view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit (upper right) taken during an overflight on May 13. The area of active lava has slowly been decreasing in recent weeks, but not all of the lava lake surface has stagnated. Portions of the lake surface continue to resurface via a process called foundering. During foundering, the dense solidified

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Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area. Fumaroles in this area emit different sulfur gases, including sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and are sampled approximately every three months by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemists to track

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, while monitoring the eruption on May 13. Two areas of ponded lava exhibited foundering, during which more-dense solidified crust sinks into the lava lake and is replaced by less-dense liquid lava from below. This photo shows the

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The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, has been growing over the past several weeks
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, at the summit of Kīlauea, has been growing over the past several weeks. This may make it seem that the eruption is over but lava continues to be supplied to the lava lake from below. With National Park Service permission, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observe this eruption from within

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A wide view of Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim, at the summit of Kīlauea
May 12, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruption activity on May 12, 2021 — Kīlauea summit

A wide view of Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim, at the summit of Kīlauea. The west vent (lower left) continues to supply lava into the lake through a submerged inlet. Much of the western active lava lake surface has crusted over in the last few weeks as the effusion rate remains low. USGS photograph taken by D. Downs on May 12, 2021.

A close up view of the western portion of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, at Kīlauea summit
May 12, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruption activity on May 12, 2021 — Kīlauea summit

A close up view of the western portion of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, at Kīlauea summit. A weak gas plume is emitted from the western fissure vent (left), with the most recent sulfur dioxide emission rate measured at 150 tonnes per day on May 11. USGS photograph taken by D. Downs on May 12, 2021 from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u.

On the west side of Mauna Loa summit, a campaign GPS (center-right) measures its location for a period of 2–3 days
May 11, 2021

Mauna Loa campaign GPS survey—May 11, 2021

On the west side of Mauna Loa summit, a campaign GPS (center-right) measures its location for a period of 2–3 days. This site has been occupied every year by helicopter since 1994. Mauna Kea, Hualālai and Haleakalā can be seen in the distance. USGS photo taken by S. Conway on May 11, 2021, during the 2021 Mauna Loa GPS campaign survey. 

Color map of lava lake at volcano summit
May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map

This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines (dark gray) that mark locations of equal elevation above sea level (asl). The map shows that the lava lake has filled 229 m (751 ft) of the crater, to an elevation of 746 m (2448 ft) asl since the eruption began on December 20, 2020. Contour lines highlighted in green, purple, and blue mark

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Color photograph of lava lake
May 7, 2021

Lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u - Kīlauea, May 7 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active, as seen in this view looking northwest. The active surface lava area continues to decrease in size, and activity is weaker, with only occasional localized surface foundering. Incandescent lava is confined to area between western fissure complex (left center) and the main island (lower right).

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
April 28, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 227 m (744 ft) deep this morning, April 28. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

On Monday, April 26, 2021, lava continued to flow from the western vent into the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater
April 27, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 227 m (744 ft) deep this morning, April 27. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color animated gif of lava lake rise
April 23, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 227 m (744 ft) deep this morning, April 23. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of instrument and mountain
April 22, 2021

Gravimeters, essentially extremely precise pendulums, can measure a change in the force of gravity to one-in-one billionth of the force you feel every day. This force varies based on the distance and the amount of mass between the instrument (or you) and the center of the Earth.

Color photograph of lava lake
April 21, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 226 m (741 ft) deep this morning, April 21. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

An HVO geologist surveys the lava lake from the eastern rim of Halema‘uma‘u Crater
April 19, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 226 m (741 ft) deep this morning, April 19. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

View looking southwest along the Southwest Rift Zone of Kīlauea Volcano.
April 15, 2021

It is no secret that the Island of Hawaiʻi is home to fantastic volcanic features, many of which have been created during eruptions of Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, and Hualalai since 1800. 

A close-up view of the western fissure within Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano
April 15, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 227 m (745 ft) deep this morning, April 15. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

View from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u shows the perched lava lake
April 14, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 227 m (745 ft) deep this morning, April 14. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Lava erupting from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater emerged from a second source closer to the vents base
April 13, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 226 m (741 ft) deep this morning, April 13. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

USGS science for a changing world
April 9, 2021

The USGS recently published a data release that includes a three-dimensional model of Puʻuʻōʻō, on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, and the collapse crater, constructed from aerial thermal images collected on 11 May 2018.  Structure-from-motion processing was used to create the model from the sequence of oblique images, and ground control using kinematic GPS was used to georegister the model.   

Color photograph of lava lake and crater wall
April 9, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 225 m (738 ft) deep this morning, April 9. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

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