Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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October 11, 2008

Halema`uma`u ash-rich pulse

movie (x3 speed) shows an ash event from the vent in Halema`uma`u, occurring at 3:54 pm. The normally white degassing plume is rapidly overwhelmed with a vigorous ash-rich pulse that rises rapidly from the vent. Red flashes above the vent indicate hot, incandescent material being ejected.

September 5, 2008

Vigorously bubbling lava surface beneath Halema`uma`u vent

Movie shows a roiling, bubbling lava surface approximately 100 yards beneath the rim of the vent within Halema`uma`u. This is the first clear view of lava within the vent, which opened on March 19, 2008. The video was taken from a helicopter hovering over the Halema`uma`u overlook area. The overhanging rim at the right side of the frame is the floor of Halema`uma`u crater

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii...
September 3, 2008

USGS HVO, Kīlauea, Hawaii

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera, overlooks Halema‘uma‘u Crater, where a new vent that opened in March 2008 emits a volcanic gas plume.

Image: The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption
September 3, 2008

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i—the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit cal...
September 3, 2008

HVO on rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera overlooking Halema‘uma‘u, Ha...

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the first volcano observatory in the United States, is located on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. A volcanic gas plume rises from a vent that opened in 2008 at the base of the south wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Crater Rim Drive in foreground.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit cal...
September 3, 2008

HVO on rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera overlooking Halema‘uma‘u, Ha...

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the first volcano observatory in the United States, is located on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. A volcanic gas plume rises from a vent that opened in 2008 at the base of the south wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Crater Rim Drive in foreground. The observatory is

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Image: USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
September 3, 2008

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is perched on the rim of Kilauea Volcano's summit caldera (next to the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park), providing a spectacular view of the active vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Image: The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption
September 3, 2008

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i—the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008.

September 2, 2008

Nightshot movie showing the explosive eruption

Movie, in 'nightshot' mode and zoomed in on the Halema`uma`u vent, shows the explosive eruption which occurred at 8:13 pm. This eruption carpeted the area around the Halema`uma`u crater rim with ejecta as large as 8 inches long.

August 31, 2008

Pulse of ash and flashes of incandescence

Video shows an ash-emission event at 6:53pm on August 31 from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The event begins with a robust pulse of ash, followed shortly by flashes of bright incandescence that rise about 50 yards above the vent.

August 27, 2008

Fifth explosive eruption

Movie shows a small explosive eruption, at 7:37 am, from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The normal white degassing plume is rapidly overwhelmed by a more robust, ash-rich plume that rises rapidly from the vent. This is the fifth explosive eruption since the new vent at Halema`uma`u appeared in mid-March.

August 20, 2008

Awesome movie! Ash-rich phase

Movie shows an example of an ash-rich phase at Halema`uma`u crater. This event occurred at 3:40pm. These sporadic ash-rich phases are probably due to small rockfalls within the vent.

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USGS
October 17, 2002

Recent visitors to the coastal eruption site, especially those unwise enough to approach the flow margins where lava is encroaching on vegetation, are being greeted by a sometimes underrated volcanic hazard-the "methane" explosion.

USGS
October 10, 2002

In the Volcano Watch article two weeks ago, we broke the news that the summit area of Mauna Loa is swelling for the first time since 1993. If this trend continues, we're on track for the next eruption.

USGS
October 3, 2002

Many streams of lava entering the ocean are shattered to bits in the surf zone. These loose fragments gradually build layers of rubble on the steep submarine slope. The resulting nearshore submarine deposits are complexly interbedded lava flows and fragments ranging in size from boulders to tiny shards of glass and minerals.

Skylight, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
September 27, 2002

Skylight, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i.

USGS
September 26, 2002

Mauna Loa has gone 18.5 years without eruption--the second longest dry spell since detailed records begin in 1843. The longest period without eruption lasted 25 years, between 1950 and 1975. Clearly the past 52 years have been much less active than the previous 107.

USGS
September 19, 2002

In early August, Pago volcano, on the central coast of New Britain Island, suddenly began exploding rocks and volcanic ash into the air. Thousands of nearby residents quickly left their homes and work to escape possible injury or death.

USGS
September 12, 2002

Recent work sheds light on Mauna Loa's magmatic plumbing. The U.S. Geological Survey has embarked on scientific investigations of the plumbing system of Mauna Loa in cooperation with researchers from University of Washington and University of North Carolina.

USGS
September 5, 2002

Luckily, Hawai`i experiences volcanic ash much less often than it does lava flows. When it comes, though, it can be anything from a nuisance to a disaster for those beneath the falling ash. The most recent ash fall, from Halemaumau in 1924, was minor but affected residents from Maku`u to Pahala. The latest major ash fall, in 1790, resulted from explosions at the summit of Kilauea.

Reginald T. Okamura commorative relief plaque and boquet of flowers
August 29, 2002

"Please do not let this rain dampen your spirits," Senator Daniel Inouye urged the gathering on a misty, breezy Volcano morning.

USGS
August 22, 2002

Big Island residents have long contended with the threat of tsunami. The central Pacific is, unfortunately, ground zero for many of the world's most destructive seismic sea waves.

USGS
August 15, 2002

On May 22, 1960, the largest earthquake ever recorded struck the coast of western Chile. The magnitude of this quake was so great that it literally went off the Richter scale; seismologists estimate the effective magnitude at about 9.5. The amount of fault slip during this quake and the area over which the slip occurred were both staggering.

USGS
August 8, 2002

On May 22, 1960, the largest earthquake ever recorded struck the coast of western Chile. The magnitude of this quake was so great that it literally went off the Richter scale; seismologists estimate the effective magnitude at about 9.5. The amount of fault slip during this quake and the area over which the slip occurred were both staggering.