Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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June 26, 2003

Surging cascade on steep cliff face

Surging cascade on steep cliff face. Note that surges override part of cascade next to cliff, which is slowed by friction with the cliff.

June 26, 2003

Lava issues from breached tube

Lava issues from breached tube and quickly disappears over old sea cliff. Note that center of stream stands above margins. See still taken at 0545 today.

June 21, 2003

Lava in channeled breakout

Lava in channeled breakout from nearby tumulus flowing rapidly down steep slope before spreading out on flat ground. Same channel as shown in last two stills for today. Width of channel, about 2 m.

June 7, 2003

Gushing start of lava cascade

Gushing start of cascade shown in image taken at 0553. Lava comes from crusted flow to right. Width of flowing lava, about 1 m.

June 7, 2003

Lava flow

Downstream from first clip about 2 m. Same as shown in image taken at 0554.

June 1, 2003

Two strands of flowing lava come together

Two strands of flowing lava come together to form single cascade on upper part of old sea cliff at Highcastle. Still taken at 0546 shows same scene.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Spreading and advancing breakout, the same as that shown in 0545 still image for today. Width of view, about 2 m.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Closer view of spreading and advancing breakout shown above. Width of view, about 0.6 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Continuation and further development of rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 23, 2003

Two converging toes

Two converging toes, the same as those shown in last two still images for today. Width of view, about 1.5 m.

April 19, 2003

Lava moving rapidly at front of breakout

Lava moving rapidly at front of breakout 880 m north of coconut grove. Width of view, about 1.5 m.

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USGS
March 29, 2001

Nearly on the other side of the planet, the Big Island has a sister, older by at least a couple of million years: Reunion Island, built in the same way as ours.

USGS
March 22, 2001

The summits of volcanoes are part of an ever-changing landscape. The summit of Mauna Loa has undergone considerable change in the short period since the first explorers began documenting their visits to the volcano.

USGS
March 15, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory currently operates a network of 65 seismic stations. Signals from each station, including the four on Maui, are radio-telemetered to HVO and recorded.

USGS
March 11, 2001

Haleakalā Crater is a large erosional valley at the summit of Haleakalā volcano, East Maui. It formed after the rimrock lava flows were erupted around the top of the volcano about 145,000 years ago, give or take about 10,000 years.

USGS
March 1, 2001

March 5 is the 36th anniversary of one of Kīlauea's most important eruptions—the 1965 eruption that formed Makaopuhi lava lake. It was the fifth of six rift eruptions between the summit eruptions of 1961 and 1967-68, and it was the longest and largest.

USGS
February 22, 2001

Several scientists from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and the University of HAW‘A‘āII attended the Cities on Volcanoes II conference held in Auckland, New Zealand, last week. Auckland is truly a city on a volcano—48 volcanoes, to be precise, ranging in age from 40,000 years to a startling 600 years.

USGS
February 15, 2001

Whenever a large, destructive earthquake occurs anywhere in the world, such as those in Sumatera and El Salvador on January 13, there is an agency within the U.S. Geological Survey responsible for disseminating information about its location and magnitude on a rapid basis 24 hours a day--the National EarthquakeInformation Center (NEIC).

USGS
February 8, 2001

The tiny, crescent-shaped island of Molokini lies 4.2 km (3 miles) offshore of Haleakalā volcano, East Maui. Molokini is a volcanic cone that rises about 150 m (500 ft) from the submarine flank of Haleakalā to a summit only 49 m (162 ft) above sea level.

USGS
February 1, 2001

Many readers have visited Halema`uma`u, but how many have turned the other way and walked across Crater Rim Drive? Within 800 m (half a mile) roundtrip, you can see some very different features from those near Halema`uma`u, generally without the sulfurous gas.

USGS
January 25, 2001

With east Hawai'i in the throes of "vog season" over the past several months, the National Park Service (NPS) and U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (USGS - HVO) have collaborated on a new initiative designed to better protect the health of visitors and employees in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.

USGS
January 18, 2001

The Hawaiian Islands are home to thousands of plant and animal species found nowhere else in the world. Protecting these native species against the many threats to their survival - including habitat destruction and invasions of alien species—is a significant challenge, but also an important goal.

USGS
January 11, 2001

If we had a dime for every time we've heard a visitor ask, "When is the volcano going to erupt?," we wouldn't be rich, but at least we could go out to dinner some place nice. As it is, we just sigh and launch into our usual explanation. The volcano is erupting, we say, but it's not the kind of eruption you were expecting.