Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Side by side comparisons of caldera showing change.
May 18, 2018

Radar amplitude images show changes to the caldera area of Kīlauea Volcano

Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone Fissures and Flows, May 18 at 1:00 p.m. HST
May 18, 2018

Location of the lava flow spreading

Thermal map of northeast end of fissure system...
May 18, 2018

Thermal map shows a close up of the northeastern end of the fissure system

Thermal map of northeast end of fissure system...
May 16, 2018

Thermal map shows a close up of the northeastern end of the fissure system

Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone Fissures and Flows, May 16 at 7:00 a....
May 16, 2018

Location of the lava flow spreading from fissure 17

Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone Fissures and Flows, May 15 at 7:00 a.m...
May 15, 2018

Location of the ‘a‘ā lava flow spreading from fissure 17

Thermal map of northeast end of fissure system...
May 15, 2018

Thermal map shows a close up of the northeastern end of the fissure system.

Thermal map of northeast end of fissure system...
May 14, 2018

Close up of the northeastern end of the fissure system.

Thermal map of the fissure system...
May 14, 2018

Thermal map shows the fissure system during an overflight of the area in Leilani Estates

Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone Fissures and Flows, May 14 at 2:30 p.m...
May 14, 2018

Location of fissure 17. 

Thermal map of fissure system...
May 13, 2018

Map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone fissures

Kīlauea Lower East Rift Zone Fissures, May 13 at 9:00 a.m. HST...
May 13, 2018

Location of fissure 17. In addition to fissure 17, the map shows earlier fissures, lava flows, and steaming areas.

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Overflight photo of erupting western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u, February 16, 2021
February 16, 2021

Overflight photo of western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u—Kīlauea summit

This photo of the erupting western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea was captured during a helicopter overflight on the morning of Tuesday, February 16. The degassing cone was not visibly spattering during the overflight, but the lava inlet near the base of the cone is evidence of continued effusion into the lava lake. USGS photo taken by M. Zoeller.

On Friday, February 12, HVO scientists hiked along the rim of Halema‘uma‘u to capture photos of the lava lake
February 12, 2021

View of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake from the northwest, February 12, 2021

On Friday, February 12, HVO scientists hiked along the rim of Halema‘uma‘u to capture photos of the lava lake from different vantage points. In this photo from the northwest rim, the active western fissure is tucked into the lower-right corner of the crater. The actively circulating western portion of the lava lake (lower-right) and the stagnant eastern portion (upper-left

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Panorama of 2018 Kīlauea collapse features from the southeast, February 12, 2021
February 12, 2021

Panorama of 2018 Kīlauea collapse features from the southeast—Feb. 12

While hiking along the rim of the 2018 collapse at the summit of Kīlauea on Friday, February 12, HVO scientists visited a site to the southeast of Halema‘uma‘u known as Akanikōlea—a culturally-significant place that is featured in Hawaiian legends. Though the lava lake from the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u is not visible from here, Akanikōlea afforded an excellent wide

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This photo shows the southwest region of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit.
February 12, 2021

Southwest region of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake—Kīlauea summit

This photo shows the southwest region of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit. Foundering of the active lava lake surface crust—a common process where liquid lava overrides and submerges crust—was observed by HVO scientists on February 12. Several rockfall deposits from the Halema‘uma‘u crater walls are visible on the stagnant lava lake margin (upper-

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This telephoto image of the western vent was taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit.
February 12, 2021

Telephoto image of the western vent—Kīlauea summit eruption

This telephoto image of the western vent was taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. An incandescent opening near the top of the cone (center) was producing rare spatter on February 12. The inlet into the lava lake is visible in the upper-center. SO2 emission rates remain elevated. USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither.

A telephoto image of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit.
February 12, 2021

Close-up view of the west vent—Kīlauea summit eruption

A telephoto image of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. Lava is being supplied to the active western lava lake through the inlet at the base of the vent (lower-center). This photo was taken from the southern rim of Halema‘uma‘u, within an area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public for safety reasons. USGS photo taken

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Color photograph of lava
February 11, 2021

February 11, 2021 — Kīlauea

A close-up of the inlet zone showing the small upwelling area at the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of volcanic vent and lava lake
February 11, 2021

February 11, 2021 — Kīlauea

The flow of the lake around a small island, south of the inlet zone, formed a heart-shaped outline in the western portion of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of volcanic vent and lava lake
February 11, 2021

February 11, 2021 — Kīlauea

No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater during the field visit to Kīlauea Volcano's summit on Thursday, February 11. The western fissure, shown here, remained active with lava entering the lake at the normal inlet site. The inlet consisted of a small upwelling zone that was raised several meters (yards) above the surrounding lake surface.

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February 11, 2021

Kīlauea Summit Eruption (Feb 11, 2021)

On February 11, 2021, no major changes were observed at the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The inlet site where lava is entering the lake had a small upwelling zone raised slightly above the surrounding lake surface. 

Color photograph of lava lake
February 10, 2021

February 10, 2021 — Kīlauea View of lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u

Twilight view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. This photo, taken from the southern rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater and looking northward, shows the active western (left) portion of the lava lake, which has hot incandescent lava visible at boundaries between plates on the lava lake. The inactive eastern (right) portion of the lake appears dark. USGS

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An aerial view of the Halema‘uma‘u crater lava lake on Tuesday, February 9, 2021
February 9, 2021

Overflight view of Halema‘uma‘u crater—Kīlauea summit eruption Feb. 9

An aerial view of the Halema‘uma‘u crater lava lake on Tuesday, February 9, 2021 as viewed from the south during a helicopter overflight of Kīlauea summit. Lava continues to erupt and enter into the lava lake from the inlet at the base of the west vent, which is visibly incandescent on the left in the photo. Only the western part of the lake surface remains active within a

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USGS science for a changing world
October 23, 2020

Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. A small swarm of shallow seismicity over the past 24 hours has occurred near the Ka‘ōiki fault system, northwest of Kīlauea's summit. Other Kīlauea monitoring data streams remain stable and show no signs of increased activity.

Color photograph of charcoal and overlying lava flow, rock hammer for scale
October 22, 2020

One of the fundamental premises of geology is that the "key to understanding the future is to understand the past."  In order to forecast how a volcano will behave, geologists must map the deposits from past eruptions and determine the ages of those deposits. Radiocarbon dating is our principal tool of use.

Color photograph of two scientists sampling a volcanic fumarole
October 20, 2020

Direct gas sampling at Sulphur Banks on September 30, 2020

UH-Hilo geology majors measure vertical offset of Hilina Pali road on Kulanaokuaiki Pali in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park
October 15, 2020

The Koa‘e fault system connects Kīlauea’s East and Southwest Rift Zones south of the caldera. Faults here appear as low cliffs, or “scarps” along Hilina Pali Road in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. These fault-cliffs slip during major earthquakes, such as those of May 4, 2018—near the beginning of Kīlauea’s 2018 eruption.

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake
October 14, 2020

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea Caldera from the foot of the Halema‘uma‘u Trail in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, fr
October 9, 2020

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea caldera

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory library after the magnitude-6.6 Ka‘ōiki earthquake on 1983 November 16.
October 8, 2020

Major earthquakes cannot be predicted. Successful earthquake predictions need to have three things correct: the location, the time, and the magnitude. The best anyone can reliably do is get two out of three correct. And the most important thing for everyone to do is prepare—have a plan, build a kit, and practice drills. Join us for the ShakeOut on October 15th!

image related to volcanoes. See description
October 2, 2020

A news release published by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on September 30, 2020, announces a report summarizing initial public input about the disaster recovery project to repair and/or replace critical infrastructure in the park, and U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory facilities and equipment damaged during the 2018 eruption and summit collapse of Kīlauea Volcano.

Color photograph of earthquake report
October 1, 2020

Residents on the Island of Hawaiʻi are accustomed to feeling earthquakes. As the ground shaking subsides and the safety of everyone around is assured, one of the first questions we typically ask is “how big was that earthquake?”