Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volc...
June 6, 1990

Lava flows around Walter's Drive Inn sign in Kalapana, Kīlauea

Lava rises around Walter's Drive Inn sign. Concrete walls of the store and roof of the post office are in the background.

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcan...
June 3, 1990

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Lava entering ocean at Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pHOEHOE flows, Kīlauea Vo...
May 31, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by Pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Individual pāhoehoe flow fronts were typically only 10-20 cm thick as they moved through Kalapana. However, the thin leading edges of the flows quickly crusted over and stagnated. As lava continued to push beneath the crust, the cooled surface was lifted up until eventually lava again broke out of the sides and front of the inflated flows. In this way, many of the

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Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea V...
May 16, 1990

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe, Kīlauea

Kalapana Gardens subdivision inundated by pāhoehoe flows, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea V...
May 2, 1990

Lava flow advancing through Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

The left edge of the lava flow is following the inland contours of Hakuma horst, the fault block to the left, which is directing the flow into the heart of Kalapana.

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai...
May 2, 1990

Lava enters Harry K. Brown Park in Kalapana, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Harry K. Brown Park was originally called "Wai'akolea Park." It was renamed "Harry Ka'ina Brown Memorial Park" in 1953 after Brown, a county auditor, whose ancestral home was in Kalapana. Thick smoke is from burning asphalt.

Lava flow encroaching on the Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea ...
April 3, 1990

Lava flow encroaching on Kalapana Gardens subdivision, Kīlauea

Aerial view of pāhoehoe flow encroaching on the Kalapana community. Hakuma horst, a raised fault block, is on the left. To the right of the point are fishponds, and to their right, Walter's Kalapana Store and Drive Inn. In the large trapezoidal plot are Mauna Kea Congregational Church and hall. The white structure across the street from the Congregational Church is St.

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Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea Volcano, H...
February 15, 1990

Channelized pāhoehoe flows from Kupaianaha vent, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

View looking uphill at surface flows advancing down a steep slope (Pulama pali) between the east rift zone and the coastal plain of Kīlauea Volcano. Overflows from the channel on the right are building levees of pāhoehoe. Within a few days, crust accreting inward from the levees built a roof over the channel, forming a new lava tube.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube, onto a small ledge, then cascades down to the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Kilauea lava flows from a tube into the sea, November 27, 1989

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on 11/27/1989. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, eruption pisode 48, Kupapau lava flow. Hawai'i Island.

A narrow stream of yellow-hot lava flows out of a lava tube onto rocks and into the ocean.
November 27, 1989

Lava tube sea entry on Hawai'i Island

Lava flows from a lava tube into the sea near Kupapau Point on Hawai'i Island. From the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption, November 27, 1989. Episode 48 of the Kupapau Lava Flow.

A small stream of red hot lava spreads out in a smooth, ropy texture as it cools to black.
June 15, 1989

Pahoehoe from Kilauea eruption, 1989

Pahoehoe ropes form in the Wahaula Lava Flow across from Wahaula Visitor Center on Hawai'i Island during the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption on 6/15/89.

Poster laid out with photos, images, and text.
December 31, 1988

Giant Hawaiian Underwater Landslides

Large-scale poster describing USGS work.

The USGS, in cooperation with the UK Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) and others, took images of the seafloor 200 miles around the Hawaiian Islands using GLORIA. GLORIA is a long-range sonar that gives a bird’s-eye view of the seafloor.

We discovered landslide blocks up to 12 miles across, and smaller blocks

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Filter Total Items: 2,137
USGS
February 17, 2000

Annual rainfall totals on the windward slopes of Mauna Loa and Kīlauea average up to nearly 10 meters (300 inches), yet there are no perennial streams on either volcano. Where does all the water go?

USGS
February 10, 2000

Haleakalā, the volcano that forms East Maui, had higher summit elevations in its glorious past. Today the volcano's highest point is 10,023 feet, but one million years ago it may have been as high or higher than the 13,679-foot summit of Mauna Loa. 

USGS
February 3, 2000

What is the longest eruption in memory at Kīlauea? The ongoing Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha eruption, which entered its 18th year on January 3? The nearly continuous activity of Halema`uma`u in the 19th century, remembered so vividly in many writings? Well, arguably it was an eruption in the 15th century, which just may be memorialized in the Pele-Hi`iaka chant.
 

USGS
January 27, 2000

Gravy and Hostess cupcakes—both delicious in their own way, but not necessarily in combination. Although they are extremely different from each other—each with a unique flavor, texture and aroma, each providing a unique culinary and sensory experience—they share a fundamental ingredient. 

USGS
January 20, 2000

Strolling the desolate Mo`omomi Beach of Moloka`i's north shore some 30 years ago, a woman came upon what appeared to be the remains of a turkey dinner projecting from an eroded sea cliff.
 

USGS
January 13, 2000

Geologists everywhere like to study rocks in the field, but few of them get to map rocks that are still molten and on the move. Here in Hawai`i, we map the new lava flows erupted from Kīlauea Volcano to determine their extent and volume. Mapping also helps us to keep track of how fast flows are advancing toward inhabited areas.
 

USGS
January 6, 2000

This Thursday, January 13, marks the 40th anniversary of the Kapoho eruption, the sequel to the Kīlauea Iki eruption in November-December 1959. It was far from being just a Kīlauea Iki 2, though, as residents of Kapoho and Koa`e villages were unfortunately to discover.
 

USGS
January 2, 2000

Tomorrow, January 3, marks the 17th anniversary of the ongoing Pu`u `O`o - Kupaianaha eruption. Some readers are too young to remember the eruption in its glory days, when lava fountains as high as 460 m (1500 ft) burst from Pu`u `O`o every three to four weeks.

USGS
December 26, 1999

The staff and associates of the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Kīlauea Field Station extend a warm and cheerful holiday greeting to all of the faithful readers of our column.

USGS
December 19, 1999

An employee of the Hilo Hawaiian hotel recently called the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and asked about the origin of Coconut Island. This is a 1.3-hectare (3.1-acre) island, also known as Mokuola, located in Hilo Bay, just offshore of the hotel on Waiakea peninsula.
 

USGS
December 9, 1999

Last week's heavy rains on the Big Island brought an end to one of the worst seasons for yellowjacket wasps around Mauna Loa in more than a decade.
 

USGS
December 2, 1999

The heavy rain that East Hawai`i experienced this week, particularly on Wednesday night and Thursday morning, suggested the topic for this week's column. Does heavy rain influence eruptions?