Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone la...
January 6, 2015

This large-scale map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow.

Thermal overlay of distal part of flow field...
January 6, 2015

This map overlays a georegistered mosaic of thermal images collected during a helicopter overflight of the distal part of Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow on January 6 at about 11:30 AM. 

Satellite image of area around front of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone la...
January 4, 2015

Image showing a close-up of the June 27th lava flow in the area of Kaohe Homesteads and Pāhoa. 

Episode 61 (Peace Day) flow field...
October 29, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 (Peace Day) flow field...
October 10, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea's ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 (Peace Day) flow field...
October 4, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 (Peace Day) flow field...
September 25, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea's ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 (Peace Day) flow field
August 8, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 ("Peace Day") flow field
June 29, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 (“Peace Day”) flow field
June 15, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 flow: April 11, 2012...
April 11, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

Episode 61 flow: March 20, 2012...
March 20, 2012

Map showing the extent of lava flows erupted during Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption and labeled with the years in which they were active.

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Color photograph of road and crater lake
September 23, 2020

Kīlauea’s summit water lake and Crater Rim Drive - September 23, 2020

Portions of Crater Rim Drive, within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, appear cracked, offset, and down-dropped in this photo, taken during an overflight of Kīlauea’s summit on September 23, 2020. To the north, Kīlauea’s summit water lake, within Halema‘uma‘u, is visible. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.

Photograph of trail and sulfur banks
September 23, 2020

Sulphur Banks area and Ha‘akulamanu trail

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists flew over the Sulphur Banks area and Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on September 23, 2020. Fumaroles in the Sulphur Banks area are sampled approximately every three months by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemists to track long-term changes in volcanic gas chemistry at Kīlauea. USGS photo by K.

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Color photograph of steam vents
September 23, 2020

Wahinekapu (Steaming Bluff) and the Steam Vents area

The weather was overcast during an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on September 23, 2020. This view shows Wahinekapu (Steaming Bluff) and the Steam Vents area within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Extensive cracks in the area allow heated groundwater to escape from underground. Cracks reach up to 63 degrees Celsius (145 degrees Fahrenheit), preventing trees from growing.

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Photograph of scientists surveying caldera
September 23, 2020

Kīlauea summit gravity survey - September 23, 2020

On September 23, 2020, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geophysicists and a geologist conducted a gravity survey of Kīlauea summit, as part of HVO's regular monitoring program. In this photo, scientists are carrying survey equipment westward along the remnants of the Halema‘uma‘u Trail on the down-dropped block of Kīlauea caldera. The fissure from the 1954 eruption can be seen

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Photograph of scientists surveying caldera
September 23, 2020

Kīlauea summit gravity survey - September 23, 2020

During a gravity survey, HVO scientists measure the relative strength of gravity (gravimeter, bottom left corner of photo) between benchmarks. High-precision vertical positions from kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS, tripod and antenna middle of photo) help correct the gravity measurement for the effects of elevation changes. The south sulfur banks, exposed during

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Photograph of gravimeter in caldera
September 23, 2020

Kīlauea summit gravity survey - September 23, 2020

A gravimeter makes a measurement at a benchmark situated among lava flows erupted in 1919. The strength of gravity varies with both elevation and the amount of mass beneath the instrument. Changes in mass can indicate changes in the amount of magma entering Kīlauea's magma reservoirs. USGS photo by A. Flinders.

Photograph of scientist surveying gravity in caldera
September 23, 2020

Kīlauea summit gravity survey - September 23, 2020

An HVO geophysicist takes a gravity measurement at a benchmark near a continuous gravimeter (inside hutch). The continuous gravimeter takes gravity measurements once per second and relays the data via radio back to HVO. During the gravity survey on September 23, 2020, HVO scientists took measurements at multiple locations on the floor of Kīlauea caldera. By comparing the

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September 23, 2020

Views of Kīlauea's growing summit water lake

A helicopter overflight on September 23, 2020, provided airborne views of the water lake at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Visual and thermal images collected during the overflight are used for mapping the slowly enlarging lake. A segment of the video shows the remains of Crater Rim Drive, a portion of which collapsed during the 2018 summit activity. USGS video by M.

September 18, 2020

Kīlauea Volcano summit water lake color zones on September 18, 2020

The color zones on the lake surface shift from minute to minute. This video shows how the color zones were creating a large swirl in the lake center. USGS video by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of volcanic lake
September 18, 2020

Color variations at Kīlauea's summit water lake - 09/18/2020

Color variations are common at Kīlauea's summit water lake, and are usually dominated by tan and brown hues. Today, the interaction between different color zones produced a large swirl in the center of the lake.

Color map of camera network coverage
September 17, 2020

Map of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s current camera network

Map of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s current camera network coverage.   Lava-flow hazard zone 1 is outlined in yellow.   Color-shaded areas are visible to at least one camera in the current network.  We would like to expand the network so that it covers the grey-shaded areas in zone 1 as well.  If your property has a good view of unshaded areas in zone 1, and you

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Last 24 Hours - Live Panorama of Kīlauea Caldera - [KEcam]
September 9, 2020

Last 24 Hours - Live Panorama of Kīlauea Caldera - [KEcam]

Last 24 Hours - Live Panorama of Kīlauea Caldera - East Wide Angle from HVO Observation Tower [KEcam].

Disclaimer: The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better views through volcanic gas. At times, clouds and rain obscure

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Filter Total Items: 2,207
USGS
June 28, 2018

These FAQs will help answer some of the most commonly asked questions about the nature of Kīlauea's summit activity and the numerous earthquakes occurring in the area.

USGS
June 27, 2018

This "Cooperator Report to the U.S. Coast Guard" addresses hazards associated with the Kamokuna ocean entry, active July 2016—November 2017, on KILAUEA's south flank

Subsidence of caldera floor impedes ability of NPIT GPS station to ...
June 25, 2018

On June 18, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory staff said a sad goodbye to a GPS instrument that had faithfully recorded over 95 m (310 ft) of downward motion of the floor of Kīlauea caldera before losing radio contact.

This means that Mauna Loa is now considered to be at a normal, background level of activity. (More information about alert level
June 22, 2018

For more than six months, earthquakes at Mauna Loa have diminished and deformation has slowed, indicating that the volcano is no longer at an elevated level of unrest. On June 21, 2018, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) lowered the alert level from ADVISORY to NORMAL, and lowered the color code from YELLOW to GREEN.

the sun is illuminating the volcanic gas plume from behind
June 17, 2018

When volcanic gases are released into the atmosphere, resulting plumes sometimes appear to have a faint color. Is this color indicative of a certain gas present? Answering this question requires describing what makes a plume visible in the first place.

Close-up photograph of stem, leaves and flower buds of haha plant
June 8, 2018

Caly isn't likely to wonder off off, but with a remote camera and monitoring station online 24-hours a day, USGS and partners at the State of Hawai‘i Division of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Hawai‘i, and the USFWS can learn how an extremely rare plant is responding to changes in environmental conditions.

low magnification photo shows ash particles
June 7, 2018

Small explosions that produce ashfall from Kīlauea Volcano's summit are not new. However, the mechanism, vigor, plume heights, and extent of ash fallout from the current explosive activity within Halema‘uma‘u are.

Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano captured from an Unmanned Aircraft Systems
June 1, 2018

With the current activity at the volcano's lower East Rift Zone and summit, it's an understatement to say that Kīlauea has been making worldwide headlines the past month.

USGS
May 29, 2018

Deflation at Kīlauea's summit has caused up to 1.5 meters (about 5 feet) of subsidence, which has stressed the faults around and within Kīlauea Caldera. 

pockets of natural gas from the burning plant material can ignite
May 24, 2018

Numerous hazards are associated with active lava flows, and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists have written about many of them in past Volcano Watch articles. However, it's been a while since one particular hazard—so-called "methane explosions"—has been addressed.

USGS
May 24, 2018

An explanation of magma movement from Kīlauea's summit through the volcano's East Rift Zone and to the eruption site(s) in lower Puna.

Image: Monitoring Gas Emissions from Kilauea Volcano
May 17, 2018

With ash eruptions occurring from Kilauea’s summit this week, there is a threat of an even larger steam-driven violent explosion. Such an eruption could happen suddenly and send volcanic ash 20,000 feet into the air, threatening communities for miles.