Unified Interior Regions

Maryland

Maryland's water supply comes from streams, rivers, groundwater and reservoirs. Many of these systems flow to the Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary. This complex ecosystem has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase. The MD-DC-DE Water Science Center studies the impacts this has on water quality, habitats and biological communities.

Maryland Water

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

The "Best Report" for 2014 is "Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas, Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2009-12"

Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas
Filter Total Items: 200
USGS
March 15, 2001

March will mark the beginning of a new field season for scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its cooperators who will begin drilling a second core hole into an impact structure created 35 million years ago when an asteroid or comet slammed into the ocean near the present-day mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

USGS
March 10, 2001

March rains helped water levels increase across Maryland and Delaware, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland. Additionally, water storage in the Baltimore reservoir system increased by 5 percent to 92 percent of capacity at the end of March.

USGS
January 5, 2001

In 2000, the average streamflow into the Chesapeake Bay was 42.2 bgd (billion gallons per day), which is 16 percent below the long-term average, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
November 7, 2000

Despite the lack of rain, many of the streamflow and ground-water levels in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were normal for October, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
October 6, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were above normal or in the upper part of the normal range for September, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
September 8, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of August in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were generally above or in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
August 7, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of July in the Maryland-Delaware-DC region were generally in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
July 7, 2000

Chesapeake Bay Inflow in June Four Times Higher Than Drought of 1999.

USGS
June 6, 2000

Below-normal precipitation in May (24% below average at BWI airport) in combination with seasonal increases in evapotranspiration resulted in lower ground-water levels and decreased streamflow in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
May 5, 2000

Levels increase in ground water and streamflow during April Substantially above-normal precipitation in April resulted in generally high ground-water levels and full reservoirs in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
April 27, 2000

How do you help an endangered species return to the wild? One way is raise the young in captivity – while keeping them as wild as possible -- and then release them in the wild.

USGS
April 7, 2000

Continued normal precipitation in March helped to replenish ground-water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research