Unified Interior Regions

Maryland

Maryland's water supply comes from streams, rivers, groundwater and reservoirs. Many of these systems flow to the Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary. This complex ecosystem has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase. The MD-DC-DE Water Science Center studies the impacts this has on water quality, habitats and biological communities.

Maryland Water

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

The "Best Report" for 2014 is "Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas, Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2009-12"

Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas
Filter Total Items: 200
USGS
March 7, 2000

Precipitation in February helped to replenish ground-water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
February 8, 2000

Snowfall in January has had minimal impact on replenishing ground water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
January 6, 2000

Streamflow into the Chesapeake Bay for the year 1999 was the fourth lowest annual flow for the period 1951-1999, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
December 6, 1999

Below-average streamflows in November caused a drop in reservoir levels and could signal a return to drought conditions if the trend continues over the winter months.

USGS
November 4, 1999

In October, the average daily flow rate in the Potomac River at Little Falls was 5.4 billion gallons per day (bgd) or about 290 percent of the normal October flow rate (1.9 bgd), according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). During October, flow varied from a high of about 15.3 bgd to a low of about 2.1 bgd.

USGS
September 23, 1999

While much of eastern North Carolina remains under water, U.S. Geological Survey scientists and hydrologic technicians are boating over rooftops, submerged cars, and bridges and roads topped by deep water to collect data and determine the amount of environmental damage done by Hurricane Floyd’s heavy rains.

USGS
September 22, 1999

Now that the fallen trees have been removed, most power is restored, and the floods have started to recede, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel have come in from the outdoors to dry off and start working on the streamflow and water-quality data they have been collecting since last Thursday, when Hurricane Floyd came through the area.

USGS
September 17, 1999

USGS scientists from the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, the National Wetlands Research Center and the Florida and Caribbean Science Center are gearing up to assess Hurricane Floyd damage to wildlife and habitat from Florida to Maine.

USGS
September 16, 1999

You can follow the storm’s flood effects on real-time web sites.

USGS
September 2, 1999

Streamflow in parts of Maryland and Delaware increased last week due to the heavy rainfall. However, the higher flows were short-lived, and flows in most streams have begun to decline to the levels that were observed before the rainfall.

USGS
August 4, 1999

A new low-flow record was set in Brandywine Creek, where the 67.2 million gallons per day (mgd) was the lowest average daily flow in July since the flow became regulated in 1973 by Marsh Creek Reservoir.

USGS
August 4, 1999

Government scientists to measure water levels in Brandywine Creek as area starts to wilt from summer heat and lack of rain.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research