Unified Interior Regions

Maryland

Maryland's water supply comes from streams, rivers, groundwater and reservoirs. Many of these systems flow to the Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary. This complex ecosystem has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase. The MD-DC-DE Water Science Center studies the impacts this has on water quality, habitats and biological communities.

Maryland Water

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

The "Best Report" for 2014 is "Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas, Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2009-12"

Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas
Filter Total Items: 200
USGS
August 2, 1999

As crops wither, power plants try to manage overloads, and rivers and streams dwindle to mere trickles, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are monitoring what could become this century’s worst drought. Such data is used by cities, counties, states and the federal government to plan for water shortages and to determine if similar problems can be avoided in the future.

USGS
July 30, 1999

Media briefing on current drought conditions in the Mid-Atlantic region including Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey and New York.

USGS
July 7, 1999

No, not another meteor disaster movie, but something left a big impression in the Chesapeake Bay.

USGS
June 3, 1999

All-time record low river flows into the Chesapeake Bay were recorded for May, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Flow into the bay has been below average for the last 10 months. Average daily freshwater inflow to the Chesapeake Bay in May was about 29.1 billion gallons per day (bgd), which is about 46 percent of the long-term average (62.6 bgd).

USGS
April 5, 1999

During March, river flow into the Chesapeake Bay and flow in the Potomac River averaged about 70% of the long-term average flow rate, according to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). 

USGS
March 23, 1999

Volunteer Bird Watchers are Key to Continent-Wide Survey’s Success: Each year, over a short period of time in early spring, a well-organized network of more than 2500 skilled amateur birders and professional biologists participate in the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS).

USGS
March 1, 1999

At the end of February 1998, streamflow in the Potomac River at Washington, DC, and total freshwater inflow to the Chesapeake Bay were the highest on record, at about 39.9 billion gallons per day (bgd) and 152.4 bgd, respectively, according to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS
December 8, 1998

From evidence of exotic nutria damage to wetlands to above average sea level rise, the Chesapeake Bay watershed is a complex and compelling scientific challenge. 

USGS
November 2, 1998

Four months of dry weather are having a strong effect on freshwater inflow to the Chesapeake Bay, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). 

USGS
October 24, 1998

Evidence found by a team of U.S. Geological Survey scientists suggesting that the temperature of the Chesapeake Bay has increased over the past 400 years will be presented by paleontologist Dr. Stacey Verardo at the Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America scheduled for Oct. 25-29 in Toronto, Canada.

USGS
October 24, 1998

A large meteorite plummeted into the western Atlantic Ocean about 35 million years ago, creating the 120-km wide Chesapeake Bay impact crater [Geology (Boulder), 22 (8), p. 691-694].

USGS
October 1, 1998

Streamflow in the Potomac River near Washington, D.C., was below average during September, but in the just-completed 1998 water year (WY98) year-long streamflow was the second highest on record, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research