Unified Interior Regions

Mississippi

We conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens and landscapes of the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean region.

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USGS science for a changing world logo
September 20, 2005

In a cooperative research program, the USGS, NASA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) are using airborne laser mapping systems to quantify coastal change along the entire coastline affected by Hurricane Katrina (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/hurricanes/katrina/).

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 14, 2005

U.S. Geological Survey scientists report that preliminary analysis of satellite data indicate Hurricane Katrina caused substantial marsh loss in St. Bernard and Plaquemines parishes.

USGS
September 6, 2005

The USGS is releasing today a 25-minute videotape of footage showing coastal impacts resulting from Hurricane Katrina along the coastline of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 6, 2005

The USGS is releasing today a 25-minute videotape of footage showing coastal impacts resulting from Hurricane Katrina along the coastline of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

USGS
September 2, 2005

 

The USGS has posted aerial photos from the northern Gulf of Mexico coastline showing before and after conditions in response to Hurricane Katrina. The photos show five photo pairs of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, and three photo pairs of Dauphin Island, Alabama. A set of ‘quick response’ photos from Bay St. Louis to Biloxi, Mississippi are also posted.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 2, 2005

 

The USGS has posted aerial photos from the northern Gulf of Mexico coastline showing before and after conditions in response to Hurricane Katrina. The photos show five photo pairs of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, and three photo pairs of Dauphin Island, Alabama. A set of ‘quick response’ photos from Bay St. Louis to Biloxi, Mississippi are also posted.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 2, 2005

"The past several days have seen remarkable devastation resulting from Hurricane Katrina. Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone who has been affected by this disaster," said USGS Acting Director Pat Leahy. "In the aftermath of Katrina, USGS research on hurricanes and natural hazards is no longer just a scientific endeavor – it is a matter of public safety."

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 29, 2005

Did you know that from your desk you can monitor the effect of Hurricane Katrina as it moves inland? The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) WaterWatch Web site can show you what’s happening to streams in your local area and show you the places most affected by heavy rains expected from this storm.

USGS
August 1, 2005

In its latest report on water use in the United States, the USGS looked at the nation's dependence on ground water. The report entitled Estimated Withdrawals from Principal Aquifers in the United States, 2000, provides details of ground-water withdrawals and use from principal aquifers in each state.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 30, 2004

Today, June 30, 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces the recipients of the first year of the Mineral Resources External Research Program, a grant and/or cooperative agreement opportunity designed to support minerals research. The grant award is split among six topics that will enhance ongoing research in the USGS and deliver products within one year.