Unified Interior Regions

Montana

Welcome to the Midwest Region! Our region includes 18 Science Centers in 11 States from the Great Lakes to the Dakotas, south to Missouri and Kentucky. Our streamgage network is used to monitor and assess water resources across the region. Other research focuses on fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, midcontinental plant/animal species, invasive species, wildlife disease, and energy and mining.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 196
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from footbridge 1920-2008

In addition to the change in the size of Grinnell Glacier, there is obvious change in the foreground streamside vegetation between these two images. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from footbridge 1887-2008

Among the earliest photos of Grinnell Glacier, this 1887 image shows the immense extent and depth of the glacier at the turn of the 20th century. The glacier has responded to temperature and precipitation in the past 100 years, resulting in it’s obvious reduction in size. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from trail 1911-2008

Nearly a century after Stanton’s photograph was taken, Grinnell Glacier has receded into it’s cirque basin and is no longer visible from the trail above Grinnell Lake. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from trail 1910-2008

Grinnell Glacier taken from the Grinnell Glacier trail, Glacier National Park. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from trail 1900-2008

In 1900 Grinnell Glacier’s mass filled the cirque basin. This early photo shows the glacier’s height along the headwall and how it was once joined the upper ice portion, now called The Salamander. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier 1887 - 2013

Heavy vegetation cover in the recent photo made this repeat photo location difficult to find. The glacial front (terminus) is over a kilometer away from this location in the 2013 photo. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grant Glacier, 1902 - 1998

Grant Glacier from Grant Ridge, Flathead National Forest, Montana. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please respect the...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Clements Glacier, 1914 - 2010

Clements Glacier displayed crevasses in 1914, but in 2010 it is merely a perennial ice mass. Each summer, thousands of visitors pass by the steep moraines sculpted by this glacier as they hike from Logan Pass to Hidden Lake Overlook. The trail is visible along the left side of the 2010 photo.

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Chaney Glacier, 1911 - 2005

View of Chaney Glacier terminus, Glacier National Park. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please respect the photographer:...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Boulder Glacier Terminus, 1913 - 2012

In the past 100 years, Boulder Glacier has been reduced to a small sliver of ice in the shadow of Boulder Peak. At the former terminus, small trees and other vegetation have become established where once there was only rock and ice. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the ...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Boulder Glacier - Chapman Peak, 1910 - 2007

Boulder Glacier as viewed from Chapman Peak in the northwest region of Glacier National Park. The historic photo shows the expansive Boulder Glacier, taken around 1910, coupled with a 2007 view of Boulder Glacier. Taken approximately 100 years apart, these images show the immense reduction in the area of Boulder Glacier. A portion of Agassiz Glacier is also visible beyond the right side of...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Boulder Glacier, 1932 - 1988

This pairing of photos from the flank of Boulder Glacier reveals a dramatic change in the 56 years between the photos. The repeat photograph was taken by Glacier National Park ranger Jerry DeSanto. Pack trips to Boulder Glacier used to include exploration of the glacier’s ice cave. The cave has long since disappeared as the glacier receded beyond this point. 

Image Use...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Filter Total Items: 267
February 23, 2016

An immobilized bear.

Biologists use a syringe pole to immobilize the captured grizzly bear.  It takes approximately 10 minutes for a bear to become immobilized.  

February 23, 2016

Ready to remove from the trap

Biologists have immobilized the bear and prepare to lift it out of the trap and onto the tarp for data collection.  Once on the tarp the bear is easier to move. 

February 23, 2016

Preparing for collection of samples

A biologist prepares to collect biological information from the bear they have captured.  Biologists collect hair samples for genetic analysis, weigh the bear,  and gather numerous measurements of the body, such as the head, paws, claws, teeth, etc.  Overall condition of the bear is assessed as well, including a body fat measurement.

February 23, 2016

Getting the bear's weight

One of the first measurements taken is the bear’s weight using a quadpod and electronic scale. 

February 23, 2016

Getting set up

Biologists are very careful to keep the grizzly bear under shade and protected from the elements while they collect biological data.  Vital signs are monitored throughout the handling period. 

February 23, 2016

Close up

The kerchief over the grizzly bear’s eyes protects it from dust and debris and reduces visual stimulation. The small tubing in its nose, known as a nasal cannula, delivers oxygen to the animal while it is tranquilized.  

February 23, 2016

Assessing body fat percentage of grizzly bear

Field personnel use bioelectrical impedance to assess body fat percentage of captured bears.  The procedure is similar to how body fat is measured in humans and is based on the resistance of body tissues to the flow of a small, harmless electrical signal.  The electrical current is impeded more by fat tissues compared with tissues that are composed mostly of water, thus

...
February 18, 2016

Westslope cutthroat trout and bull trout in the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana.

Westslope cutthroat trout and bull trout in the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana.

February 18, 2016

Getting the Shot

USGS scientist shoots a repeat photograph of Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park to illustrate glacial recession due to impacts of climate change.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center